What is the relationship between Religious Expression in public schools and the First Amendment?

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What is the relationship between Religious Expression in public schools and the First Amendment? by Mind Map: What is the relationship between Religious Expression in public schools and the First Amendment?

1. Restricting Religious Expression in public schools is Unconstitutional.

1.1. Students have the right to take part in SYATP through prayer and worship activities ("Restricting Religious Expression in Schools Is Unconstitutional").

1.1.1. According to the Constitution, "Government bodies—including public schools—may not suppress or exclude the speech of private parties—including public school students—just because the speech is religious or contains a religious perspective." ("Restricting Religious Expression in Schools Is Unconstitutional").

1.1.1.1. I agree with this because I believe that student expression should only be private.

1.1.2. The ADF states, ¨"The Supreme Court has held that student expressive activity—including prayer—cannot be impeded by the public school unless the activity creates a material and substantial disruption to the school's ability to fulfill its educational goals."¨ ("Restricting Religious Expression in Schools Is Unconstitutional").

1.1.2.1. I agree that a public school shouldnt stop a student that is privately praying unless it disrupts the learning atmosphere.

1.2. Rutherford has done a good amount of work, challenging some unconstitutional rules, and winning a lots of legal decisions on behalf of free expression (¨Fighting¨).

1.2.1. Kelly Shakelford, the southwest regional director for the Rutherford Institute, based in Dallas says, ""We're not fighting to get prayer in school. We're fighting for rights.... We don't want the government involved in religion. We also don't want religion banned.""(¨Fighting the establishment (clause)¨).

1.2.1.1. I think that it is good that the ADF is not trying to get religion into schools but are trying to get rights into school.

1.2.2. Douglas Laycock, a constitutional scholar at the University of Texas Law School who has worked with Rutherford. He says of Rutherford: "They get a bad rap.... Lots of people assume that they don't give a damn about the establishment clause, and I've certainly heard them say things that give that impression. But if you look at their cases, the great bulk are straight free speech and free exercise."¨ (¨Fighting the establishment (clause)¨).

1.2.2.1. I agree with this because all Rutherford is trying to do is fight for peoples rights not religiously slander people.

1.3. Religous Liberty believes that Restricting religious expression in public schools is unconstitutional because, they believe that the constitution and law back up their statements.

1.4. The American Prospect believes that Restricting religious expression in public schools is unconstitutional because, Court cases back up their viewpoints.

2. Restricting Religious Expression in public schools is constitutional.

2.1. Organized prayer in public schools, whether in the classroom or at a school-sponsored event, is unconstitutional ("Restricting Religious Expression in Schools Is Constitutional").

2.1.1. The law states, "Personal religious activity may not interfere with the rights or well-being of other students, and the threat of student harassment and pressure must be carefully monitored." ("Restricting Religious Expression in Schools Is Constitutional").

2.1.1.1. I agree with this because students should not interfere with other students learning or harass other students while participating in a personal religious activity.

2.1.2. The Anti-Defamation League says, ""Organized prayer in the public school setting, whether in the classroom or at a school-sponsored event, is unconstitutional."" ("Restricting Religious Expression in Schools Is Constitutional").

2.1.2.1. I agree because I believe that people should pray but not to a point where it becomes to public.

2.2. If schools allow a religious speech, they could face a lawsuit ("Religion-free").

2.2.1. Mr. Haneys, "points to a survey his group conducted in 2001 after the Clinton guidelines had been circulated that showed 40 percent of school administrators and 70 percent of teachers said they were not familiar with them." ("Religion-free").

2.2.1.1. It is ridiculous that most teachers and administrators dont even know the law.

2.2.2. Ms. Wehmann says, ""Abingdon v. Schempp," the 1962 Supreme Court ruling best remembered today for outlawing the use of the Lord's Prayer in a school's morning exercises." ("Religion-free").

2.2.2.1. I agree because I think that students should not be forced to participate in any religious activity.

2.3. Religous Liberty believes that Restricting religious expression in public schools is constitutional because, it interferes with the classroom.

2.4. The Christian Science Monitor believes that Restricting religious expression in public schools is constitutional because, it religiously persecutes students.