Competing in a global context

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Competing in a global context by Mind Map: Competing in a global context

1. Global trade competition

1.1. Globalisation

1.1.1. Politics

1.1.2. Economy

1.2. Environment

1.2.1. Macro

1.2.2. Micro

1.3. World Trade Organization (WTO)

1.4. Porter's Five forces of competition

1.4.1. Direct industry competitors

1.4.2. Suppliers

1.4.3. Buyers

1.4.4. Potential entrants

1.4.5. Substitute goods and / or services

1.5. Porter's Diamond model

1.5.1. Structure of firms and rivalry

1.5.2. Factor conditions

1.5.3. Demand conditions

1.5.4. Related and supported industries

1.6. Comparative advantage

1.6.1. Relative

1.6.2. Absolute

2. Operations

2.1. Decisions

2.1.1. Risks

2.1.2. Benefits

2.1.3. Offshoring

2.1.4. Re-shoring

2.1.5. Location

2.2. International operations strategies

2.2.1. Home country with exports

2.2.2. Multi-domestic

2.2.3. Regional

2.2.4. Global coordinated

2.3. Internationalisation

2.3.1. Cost

2.3.2. Sustainability

2.3.3. Distance

3. Supply chain management

3.1. Efficiency

3.2. Bullwhip effect

3.3. Outsourcing

3.3.1. Strategic value

3.3.2. Criticality

3.4. Suppliers

3.4.1. Relationships

3.4.2. Lambert's categorisation of supply relationships

3.4.3. Collaboration

3.5. Vertically integrated

3.5.1. Direction

3.5.2. Extent

3.5.3. Balance

4. Economics and Finance

4.1. Foreign direct investment

4.2. Financial institutions

4.2.1. International monetary fund (IMF)

4.2.2. World Bank

4.3. Global imbalances

4.4. Balance of payments

4.4.1. Current

4.4.2. Capital

4.4.3. Financial

5. Tax and exchange rates

5.1. International tax rates

5.1.1. Paying taxes project

5.1.2. Transfer pricing

5.2. Exchange rates

5.2.1. Fluctuations

5.2.2. Equilibrium

5.2.3. Demand

6. International financial reporting

6.1. Regulation

6.1.1. Imperialism

6.1.2. Tax

6.1.3. Borrowing

6.2. International accounting standards board (IFRS)

6.3. Different rules for different jurisdictions

7. Modern cities

7.1. Like countries

7.2. Leadership

7.2.1. Business

7.2.2. Civic

7.2.3. Political

7.2.4. Managerial

7.3. Elements

7.3.1. Actors

7.3.2. Structures

7.3.3. Processes

8. Global culture

8.1. Innovation

8.2. Convergence

8.3. Divergence

8.4. Crossvergence

8.5. Organisational environment

8.5.1. Global knowledge

8.5.2. Local needs

9. Human Resource Management (HRM)

9.1. Employee relations

9.1.1. Trade unions

9.2. International labour market

9.2.1. Outsourcing

9.2.2. Multicultural

9.2.3. Organisational learning

9.3. Impact employment

9.3.1. Competition

9.3.2. Technology

9.3.3. Legislation

9.4. Stakeholders

9.5. Progression

9.6. Race to bottom

10. Marketing

10.1. Branding

10.1.1. Niche / Mass

10.1.2. Global / Local

10.1.3. Innovating

10.1.4. Tribe manifestation / Tribal roles

10.1.5. Brand communities

10.2. Global positional marketing

10.3. Ethical issues

10.3.1. Differing standards of consumer protection

10.3.2. Exporting consumerism and increasing cultural homogenisation

10.3.3. Targeting lower income consumers in developing countries

10.3.4. Geographical segregation of business operations

10.3.5. Consumer and worker perspectives

10.4. Frontier markets

10.4.1. Innovation

10.4.2. Minimal consumerism

10.4.3. Helping communities

10.5. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)

10.5.1. Sustainability

10.5.2. Responsibility