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Engaging with BAME Volunteers by Mind Map: Engaging with BAME
Volunteers
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Engaging with BAME Volunteers

Contribution - high interest stakeholders

High influence

Sponsors, Lack of BAME trustees can undermine the commitment to and messaging of being inclusive (see link: page 9; and MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15), Target individuals from BAME communities (see link: page 3), Build relationships with target community (see link: page 9), Guidance on how to attract BAME trustees (See link, pages 15-16), A lack of commitment by mainstream organisations to involve BAME trustees (See link: page 12), Develop a wide range of opportunities for management, committee members, board etc. (See link: page 4), Agreeing with the staff group, which BAME groups to engage with (See link: page 5), Ensuring equal opportunities is fundamental to the organisation's philosphy and values (See link: page 13), A dedicated co-ordinator is crucial to the success of a project (See link: page 22), Lack of clarity about why BAME trustees were being recruited (See link: page 12), Ensuring equal opportunities is fundamental to the organisation's philosphy and values (See link: page 13), BAME volunteering programmes needs grass-roots development work, which would need a funding commitment (See link: page 21), Develop partnership-working with a BAME organisation (See link: page 23), There are no 'quick fixes' to encourage BAME volunteering (See link: page 32), Affinity to a local culture is often more important to an individual than identification with an ethnic minority (See link: page 3), Identify individuals to take projects over (See link: page 6), Organisations should not expect quick results (See link: page 28), Undertake a small initial project that can be delivered quickly (See link: page 3), Build on the success of the first project to encourage further ideas (See link: page 3), Don't assume a token BAME staff member will know more about BAME groups that the rest of the staff - get everyone to pitch in (MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15), Guidance on how to develop commitment at the top (See link, pages 9-14), Keep trustees and staff updated on race equality issues (See link: pages 23-24), Consult widely on how your organisation's services can benefit BAME service-users (See link: pages 31-39)

Blockers, Projects can take too long to deliver - motivation is lost and sceptisicm increases (See link: page 3), Undertake a small initial project that can be delivered quickly (See link: page 3), Build on the success of the first project to encourage further ideas (See link: page 3), Consider what barriers exist in your organisation and take action - doing an Equality Impact Assessment may be helpful (See link: pages 4 & 8), A lack of confidence within the organisation of engaging with refugees/asylum seekers (See link: page 28), Concerns about language skills of new volunteers (See link: page 28), Concerns about racism in client group or older current volunteers (See link: page 28)

Low influence

Beneficiaries, Additional knowledge that BAME volunteers bring can be shared with existing volunteers (See link: page 1), Engaging with refugees as volunteers can have valuable educational benefits for others (See link: pages 1-2), Document progress to evidence the benefits the project is having (See link: page 8), Ensure volunteers enjoy their roles (See link: page 23)

Helpless victims, Prospective volunteers did not have the skills that organisation's wanted (See link: page 14), Prospective volunteers may suffer implicit or explicit racism (see link: page 12), (Also see link: page 12), Equality training for those directly dealing with volunteers (see link; page 4), To integrate the equal opportunity policy into organisational ethos and values (see link; page 43), Have a clear procedure in place for dealing with concerns (See link: page 6), Establish standards of behaviour and an ethos of respect etc. among volunteers (See link: page 6), Ensure volunteers know who is in charge and where to go to solve any problems (See link: page 23), Include equality objectives within staff appraisals (See link: page 28), Guidance for developing a welcoming environment to BAME people (See link: pages 29-30), Make the organisation's commitment to equality and diversity clear and visible on promotional material/website etc. (See link: page 8), Existing staff/volunteers may feel uncomfortable with involvement of BAME volunteers (See link: page 25), To integrate the equal opportunity policy into organisational ethos and values (see link; page 43), Provide training for those directly dealing with volunteers (see link; page 4 ), Paid staff can feel threatened by volunteers if they are highly skilled (See link: page 12)

Contribution - low interest stakeholders

High Influence

Positive influencers, Advocates and ambassadors for volunteering from particular communities can be effective (see link: page 6), Working alongside inter-faith groups, anti-racism networks, community workers etc. (See link: page 4), Working alongside statutory organisations (e.g. schools, police etc. (MBF Rapport Magazine, Autumn 2006. pp6-7), Partnerships between national as well as local level with BME organisations (See link: page 8), Working with local faith centresand religious groups to promote volunteering (See link: page 4), (Also see link: page 16), BAME people have strong link to faith-based groups, where service to mankind is celebrated and promoted (See link: page 22), One group will often have an association with another in a different city (See link: page 4), Promoting the project in local media (See link: page 6), Potential for 'twinning' BAME organisations with mainstream organisations (See link: page 15), Settin up of a forum to give a collective voice to ethnic communities in a town (See link: page 24), BAME volunteers can offer skills not found in other parts of the population (See link: page 8), BME Twinning Initiatives can encourage integration (See link: page 4), A lack of capacity of BME organisations can be a barrier to effective partnership working (See link: page 4), Some organisations have secured funding to run targeted inclusion initiatives (See link: page 28)

Negative influencers, Approx 75% of BME organisations were unaware of Local Strategic Partnerships (See link: page 3), There is a lack of representation of refugee groups on mainstream forums (See link: page 14), Organisatons that seek to influence BAME values with their volunteers (e.g. the role of women), can be perceived as a threat to different communities (MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15), Separating personal views about women's rights from professional ones that respect culture. (MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15), There is limited interaction between Volunteer Centres and the BAME diverse communities (See link: page xii), Over half of BME Refugee organisations unaware of support provision from local Volunteer Centre (See link: page 5), 39% of BME Refugee organisations said the Volunteer Centres had intoduced them to new volunteers (See link: page 6), Suggestions for improving Volunteer Centres services [reduce bureaucracy, language support to complete forms, support provision outside office hours, more effective use of IT communications] (See link: page 7), Volunteer Centres to undertake outreach visits to BME Refugee groups (See link: page 9), Sometimes support from mainstream organisations is not appropriate (See link: page 7), More unorthodox, creative methods can work (See link: page 17), Societal racism presents barriers to establishing alliances and partnership-working (See link: page 8), Develop case studies of successful BAME volunteering and promote using a variety of media (See link: page 4), If mistrust is perceived, refer people to others BAME groups you have worked with so they can speak to them informally (See link: page 3), (Also see link: page 6), Funders requirements to engage BAME volunteers has resulted in bad experiences as volunteers were given menial tasks to do (See link: page xi), Funders fail to recognise the resources required to properly engage with and train BAME volunteers (See link: page xii), CRB checks for asylum seekers can be a problem as their will not have been in the UK for the required 10 years (See link: page 10), Middle Eastern cultures often see the role of women to be limited to indoor, humanitarian causes (See link: page 8), A lack of outreach by mainstream organisations to BAME people (See link: page 12, Inappropriate marketing strategies by mainstream organisations (See link: page 12), Recruitment opportunities exist with engaging with BAME young people, who are more aware of the concept of volunteering (See link: page xiii), Word-of-mouth volunteering is "the single most important" method of volunteering (see link: page 16), Produce communication material in a variety of formats cathering for those with English as a second language (See link: page 4), Utlise free volunteer recruitment advert opportunities within local newspapers (See link: page 4), Guidance around effective recruitment for migrant and ethnic minority volunteering (See link: pages 12-13), (Also see link for further guidance: page 17), Employing an outreach worker to engage with different communities in the area (See link: page 22), Target varied BAME groups differently (MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15)

Low influence

Bystanders, Prospective volunteers feel they would not have their skills utilised, did not have the skills that organisations wanted, or that organisations wouldn’t help them develop their skills (see link page: page 14), Build relationships with target community (see link: page 9), Facilitate postive reporting back by volunteers to their communities (See link: page 6), Promoting inclusion by taking a photograph (or press coverage) of a person from a BME community can cause distress [e.g. faith reasons or asylum seeking] (See link: page 7), Volunteering as a concept is not aligned to way BAME communities can be involved in more informal volunteering activities (See link: page 7), BAME cultures often have no systems for volunteering and the focus is on people assisting community members (See link: page 7), NB Young BAME people are more open to the concept of volunteering (See link: page xi), Use suitable communications and look to use alternatives to the word 'volunteer' (See link: page 4), Develop activities with no associated bureacracy (See link: page 23), (Also see link: page xi), Focus on asking how BAME people/communities would like to contribute (See link: page 1), Mentoring is a relevant activity in BAME communities (MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15), There is confusion about formal/informal volunteering (See link: page 24), Re-branding volunteering and seeking to develop 'bottom-up definitions (See link: pages 34-44)

Commitment

Achievement

Prospective volunteers feel they would not have their skills utilised (see link: page 14), Checking prospective volunteers skills and qualifications (see link: page 9), Encourage the nomination of individuals to work on a project (See link: page 4), Developing systems that allow volunteers to utilise and develop their skills (See link: page 13), (Also, see link: page 20)

A lack of interesting and challenging volunteering opportunities (See link: page 12), Stressing the potential for volunteers to improve their skills (See link: page 15), Ensure the project can show volunteers what skills they can gain (See link: page 22), Providing the opportunity for BAME volunteers to develop their own ideas (See link: page 3), Matching volunteers to needs is vital (See link: page 20), (Also see link: page 30), Deveop suitable opportunities for volunteers that show management potential (See link: page 9)

BAME volunteers seek volunteer opportunities to enhance their employment prospects (See link: page 26), (Also see link: page 5)

Altruism and a desire to help others less fortunate is a strong motivator in BAME communities (See link: page 5), Volunteer for BAME communities is often entwined with culture and faith motivations (See link: page 8)

BAME volunteers seeking to develop language & communication skills, and mix with British people/society (See link: page 26)

Status/Influence/Esteem

People from BME communities have a preferences to volunteer within their own communities, (Also see link: page 13)

If appropriate recognition is not given to individuals or groups involving in volunteering, this can case a severe breakdown in relationships (See link: page 7), The provision of training can reinforce the perception that the volunteers' role is valued (See link: page 18), Acknowledge the contribution of groups and individuals at every stage [with their agreement] (See link: page 6), (Also see link: page 30), Provision of effective supervision and support (See link: page 30)

A feeling from prospective volunteers that organisations wish to engage them out of tokenism (See link: page 12)

Concerns from prospective volunteers that they would be given menial tasks to do (See link: page 14), (Also see link: page 8)

People from BAME communities may lack the confidence to take part in volunteering activities (See link: page 6), (Also see link: page 15), Providing the opportunity to do familiar activities (See link: page 2), Ensure training is provided and that this is communicated (See link: page 23), Provide the opportunity for supported, short-term placements (See link: page 27), Provision of group volunteering opportunities (See link: page 5)

Some BAME cultures dislike the concept of working for no pay [can associated volunteering with slavery] (See link: page 6), Altruism and a desire to help others less fortunate is a strong motivator in BAME communities (See link: page 5), (Also see link: page 26. Also refers to cultural and religious influences)

BAME groups use volunteering as a way of instigating changes, which benefit their community (See link: page 4), Volunteering to provide service that the government is not perceived to be providing (See link: page 6), (Also see link: pages 7-8)

BAME volunteers seeking to use volunteering to build personal confidence (See link: page 5)

Asylum seekers often volunteer because they are not allowed to work (See link: page 26)

Social/affiliation

BAME volunteers can feel isolated (See link: page 12), First contact points may feel unwelcoming due to people being for example white, middle-class (See link: page 8), Raising cultural awareness among existing staff and volunteers will improve the welcome received (See link: page 8), Encouraging 'word of mouth' recruitment with existing BAME volunteers (See link: page 1)

A preference for the famliar (See link: page 8), Provision of culturally specific resources/facilities (See link: page 8), (Also see link: page 8), Offer flexible opportunities that can be balanced with social/religious commitments (See link: page 4), Providing the opportunity to do familiar activities (See link: page 2), Develop a gradual processes of encouraging volunteers to move from volunteering in their own communities to the wider community (See link: pages 20-21)

BAME volunteers treasure the social aspect of volunteering in the community (See link: page 24), (Also see link: page 5), Providing volunteering placements that provide the opportunity to socialise (See link: page 8), Also see link: page 26)

A desire to focus volunteering efforts that help families they have left behind (See link: page 6)

Safety

Fear of implicit or explicit racism (see link: page 12), (Also see link: page 12), Equality training for those directly dealing with volunteers (see link; page 4), To integrate the equal opportunity policy into organisational ethos and values (see link; page 43), Organisations that demonstrate they have equal opportunities in place are more successful at attracting bAME volunteers (See link: page 8), Make a public commitment to promote equality and combat racism (See link: page 6)

Organisation may not help them develop skills (See link:page 14), Holding open days

Practicality

Taking care of children and other family responsibilities (see link: page 12), Provision of child care facilities or expenses (See link; page 13)

Concerns around losing benefits if volunteering (See link: page 31), Provide access to information around benefits (See link)

CRB checks can be more difficult for refugees due to ID documents and changes of address (See link: page 3)

59% of BME Refugee organisations stating they had no money to pay expenses, and 88% stating this was a barrier to recruitment (See link: page 5), Expenses not paid promptly (See link: page 26)

Volunteers for refugee organisations cannot switch off like their host community counterparts (approached for help when not volunteering) (See link: page 24)

Living in a hostel or destitute (See link: page 26)

Competence

Skills/capability

Organisational, Concern that targeted recruitment tools are discriminatory (see link: page 40), Language and communication barriers (see link: page 2), (Also see link: page 12 ), Build relationships with target community (see link: page 9), Working with BAME volunteers to match languages with service-users (MBF Rapport Magazine, Autumn 2006. pp6-7), mentors can be helpful if people are available (See link: page 6), Checklist of tips to engage with non-native English speakers (See link: page 30), Training tends to be given in the English language can be considered exclusive (See link: page 8), NB many non-native English speakers volunteer in order to practice and improve their English (See link: page 30), Current volunteers can help to provide translation services (written or verbal) (See link: page 30), Running off different versions of materials in different languages is costly (See link: page 6), Ask local groups for assistance for translating written materials (See link: page 6), Literature is important, but only in connection with outreach work (See link: page 29), If appropriate recognition is not given to individuals or groups involving in volunteering, this can case a severe breakdown in relationships (See link: page 7), The provision of training can reinforce the perception that the volunteers' role is valued (See link: page 18), Acknowledge the group and individuals at every stage [with their agreement] (See link: page 6), People don't always want to fill out an evaluation questionnaire after the completion of a BME volunteering project (See link: page 8), Develop more creative ways of getting feedback from volunteers on a project (See link: page 8), BME communities have a long tradition of informal rather than formal involvment in volunteering (See link: page 10), Ensuring volunteers can contribute flexible hours (See link: page 13), Flexibility around times for young people at school or college, migrant workers, single parents etc. (See link: page 6), Develop activities with no associated bureacracy (See link: page 23), Undertake field research by asking what relevant people in the community want (MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15), Develop flexibility using a rota system with cover built in (See link: page 19), A lack of outreach by mainstream organisations to BAME people (See link: page 12, Inappropriate marketing strategies by mainstream organisations (See link: page 12), Recruitment opportunities exist with engaging with BAME young people, who are more aware of the concept of volunteering (See link: page xiii), Word-of-mouth volunteering is "the single most important" method of volunteering (see link: page 16), Produce communication material in a variety of formats cathering for those with English as a second language (See link: page 4), Utlise free volunteer recruitment advert opportunities within local newspapers (See link: page 4), Guidance around effective recruitment for migrant and ethnic minority volunteering (See link: pages 12-13), (Also see link for further guidance: page 17), Employing an outreach worker to engage with different communities in the area (See link: page 22), Target varied BAME groups differently (MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15), A range of methods of recruiting refugees and asylum seekers, used for different organisations (See link: page 28), The use of media to recruit volunteers in BME organisations is limited (See link: page 15), Campaigns need to be targeted in other languages and in local Asian or BME press and radio (See link: page 16), Media should use terminology such as 'helping out' rather than 'volunteering' (See link: page 16), Bureaucracy within mainstream organisations (See link: page 12), (Also see link: page 8), Seeking to reduce the paperwork needed to meet checking and induction criteria (See link: page 4), Develop activities with no associated bureacracy (See link: page 23), Providing a system of support for volunteers that is effective not not bureacratic (See link: page 23), Prospective volunteers 'shadow' a volunteer before filling out forms to see if the scheme is appropriate for them (MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15), Engaging BAME communities in a project that interests them is a time-consuming activity (See link: page 24), (Also see link: page 4), Lack of resources for additional marketing or expansion of volunteering (See link: page 28), There is greater scope for training BME volunteers and also thanking volunteers for their contribution and recognising their efforts (See link: page xii), Over half of BME Refugee organisations stated they needed help to recruit/manage volunteers (See link: page 5), BME Refugee organisations rated the support provided by Volunteer Centres as good or excellent (See link: page 6), Support is not provided outside office hours, and by people who can speak the same language (See link: page 6), Good practice can be shared amongst Refugee Community Organisations possibly through Refugee Forums (See link: page 17), Some organisations are creative in the roles they devised for volunteers (See link: page 28), An outline of good practice BAME inclusive management practices (See link: page 31), Recruitment and Induction (See link: pages31-32), Support and supervision (See link: pages 33-35), Sustaining partnerships (See link: pages 36-37), Leaving volunteering (See link: pages 38-39)

Individual, BME volunteers unable to communicate easily in English (see link: page 9), Provide English lessons, perhaps jointly with other organisations for volunteers (See link: page 9), Produce communication material in a variety of formats cathering for those with English as a second language (See link: page 4), Checklist of tips to engage with non-native English speakers (See link: page 30)

Knowledge

Organisational, Unaware of how volunteering is perceived as a concept to BAME groups (see link: page 8), Build relationships with target community (see link: page 9), Explore if one of staff/volunteers has an understanding of differemt cultures (MBF Rapport Magazine, Summer 2006. pp14-15), Guidance on who can be engaged as a volunteer, UKBA Comprehensive guidance for Employers - Illegal working (See link: pages 61-66), Volunteering England guidance sheet on who is allowed to volunteer (See link), Uncertainty about the equivalence of foriegn experience and qualifications (See link: page 9), Ensure initial checking and ongoing monitoring systems are in place (See link: page 9), Nervousness about getting things wrong re recruitmment procedures/asylum legislation etc. (See link: page 28)

Individual, Lack of knowledge about volunteer opportunities and the benefits they offer (see link: page 12), (Also see link: page 8), Guidance around effective recruitment for migrant and ethnic minority volunteering (See link: pages 12-13), (Also see link: page 26), (Also see link: page 28)