SCOUT FINCH

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SCOUT FINCH by Mind Map: SCOUT FINCH

1. Acts like

1.1. Tom Boy"Aunt Alexandra was fanatical on the subject of my attire. I could not possibly hope to be a lady if I wore breeches; when I said I could do nothing in a dress, she said I wasn't supposed to be doing things that required pants. Aunt Alexandra's vision of my deportment involved playing with small stoves, tea sets, and wearing the Add-A-Pearl necklace she gave me when I was born; furthermore, I should be a ray of sunshine in my father's lonely life." This demonstrates to the reader more about Scouts personality. from this the readers can learn that Scout prefers to be dressed causally rather than in a dress insinuating that she is a sorta Tom boy. This also tells us about Scout's appearance. She may act like a tom boy but she also dresses like one too. She is against wearing any dresses. Intelligent "Now you tell your father not to teach you any more." In this chapter Scout's new teacher is making scout feel bad about the fact that he had previously learnt things before he started school.

2. Motivated by

2.1. “I think there's just one kind of folks. Folks.” Scout says this to Jem when they are discussing why different groups in their town do not get along. Jem disagrees and believes that people’s differences are the source of their disagreements. While Jem accurately identifies a major source of conflict in Maycomb, Scout expresses a deeper yet more naïve understanding of people’s shared humanity. Her innocence is also a lesson to the reader, because it communicates an idealized world in which people are able to respect one another despite racial and socioeconomic differences.

2.2. M

2.3. This quote underlines the value of empathy, a frame of mind that speaks of compassion towards other people and understanding of what they are going through in life.

2.4. The character Scout is motivated by her beliefs and values including her strong family morals. Her brother Jem, he doesn't necessarily motivate Scout but he has a huge effect on her. She takes what he says very seriously. "“I was not so sure, but Jem told me I was being a girl, that girls always imagined things, that’s why other people hated them so, and if I started behaving like one I could just go off and find some to play with.”

3. Textual issues or concerns linked to the character

3.1. "There's some folks who don't eat like us," she whispered fiercely, "but you ain't called on to contradict 'em at the table when they don't. That boy's yo' comp'ny and if he wants to eat up the table cloth you let him, you hear?" "He ain't company, Cal, he's just a Cunningham-" "Hush your mouth! Don't matter who they are, anybody sets foot in this house's yo' comp'ny, and don't you let me catch you remarkin' on their ways like you was so high and mighty! Yo' folks might be better'n the Cunninghams but it don't count for nothin' the way you're disgracin' 'em—if you can't act fit to eat at the table you can just set here and eat in the kitchen!" Calpurnia sent me through the swinging door to the diningroom with a stinging smack. (3.26-29) This tells us that one of the concerns that is facing Scout is that her family has different morals to other families. They do things differently. Atticus representing Tom Robinson. Atticus representing Tom Robinson impacts Scout and Jem her brother hugely. “The adults in Maycomb never discussed the case with Jem and me; it seemed that they discussed it with their children, and their attitude must have been that neither of us could help having Atticus for a parent, so their children must be nice to us in spite of him. The children would never have thought that up for themselves: had our classmates been left to their own devices, Jem and I would have had several swift, satisfying fist-fights apiece and ended the matter for good. As it was, we were compelled to hold our heads high and be, respectively, a gentleman and a lady.”

4. How others see him or her

4.1. Tomboyish and unladylike Jean Louise catches Walter Cunningham in the schoolyard and beats him up for being the reason she got in trouble. Scout also swears a lot when she doesn't get her way as a form of expression. Aunt Alexandra doesn't approve of her ways. "Aunt Alexandra was fanatical on the subject of my attire. I could not possibly hope to be a lady if I wore breeches; when I said I could do nothing in a dress, she said I wasn't supposed to be doing things that required pants. This is unexpected from a young girl. She is expected to be ladylike and tame and wear dresses while she is doing the complete opposite of all those things. She has a quick temper and lack of self control. She is a bit of a simpleton when it comes to moral matters. When she hears someone call Atticus a nigger lover, she cannot control herself and acts out by getting verbally and physically violent. Scout just wants a quick fix for complicated questions. Atticus has to tell Scout not to get physical anymore. Curious Scout does not fear asking Atticus what rape is after finding out he is defending a "nigger" for rape. Aunt Alexandra was fanatical on the subject of my attire. I could not possibly hope to be a lady if I wore breeches; when I said I could do nothing in a dress, she said I wasn't supposed to be doing things that required pants. Scout is understandably curious for a young girl who has a lot to learn about life. Her open relationship with Atticus is definitely something that contributes to her inquisitiveness. It is very clear that Scout asks a lot of questions throughout the entire book whether it be about big or small things. We can also see her curiosity when she shows up at the jail the night the mob turned up because she wanted to see what Atticus was up to. Her curiosity towards Boo Radley is also very evident between Jem, Dill and herself.

4.2. A Leader Others are intimidated by her Has a lot of pride in herself "What bothers me is that she and Jem will have to absorb some ugly things pretty soon...Scout's just as soon jump on someone as look at him if her pride's at stake.." (pg 88)

5. Beliefs and values

5.1. Goodness in everyone Little evil in the world "Entailements are bad, I was advising him, when I slowly awoke to the fact that I was addressing the entire aggregation. The men were all looking at me, some had their moths half-open." In a serious, dangerous, situation at the Jail, Scout is completely unaware of what's happening and starts having a conversation with the men." Everyones the same (equality) "Naw, Jem , I think there's just one kind of folks. Folks" - pg 247 Learning (from Atticus) "But if I keep on goin' to school, we can't ever read any more..."

6. Looks like

6.1. Aunt Alexandra was fanatical on the subject of my attire. I could not possible hope to be a lady if I wore breeches. 81 1.1.1. Scout never used her real name and always dressed as a tom boy. Unlike other girls she never really cared all that much about her appearance. "“I was not so sure, but Jem told me I was being a girl, that girls always imagined things, that’s why other people hated them so, and if I started behaving like one I could just go off and find some to play with.”