Mexican Catholic Funerals

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Mexican Catholic Funerals by Mind Map: Mexican Catholic Funerals

1. 4. Contemporary period: Intellectuals and artists assembled the possibility that all Mexicans had particular treatment with death, which caused no dread and that they commended its landing.

1.1. CULTURES THAT STARTED AROUND THIS ERA

1.1.1. 1. More Time with the Dead

1.1.1.1. 2. Belongings of the Deceased

1.1.1.1.1. 3. Velorios

1.1.1.1.2. Velorio is the Spanish word for wake, and it’s pretty similar to an open casket viewing in America or Canada. The only real difference is that in some instances, the deceased is in a glass coffin or covered in a simple, translucent shroud rather than an open casket. During a velorio, most families will place a candle (vela, in Spanish — which is why this ceremony is called a velorio) at each corner of the coffin. After the velorio, any remaining stubs of these candles are saved, as they are believed to bring good luck.

1.1.1.2. Individuals are typically buried with more belongings than those in America or Canada. Clothing and favorite possessions are placed in the coffin with them, as it is believed they will continue to use these things in the afterlife.

1.1.2. When someone dies in Mexico, it’s uncommon for the family to immediately have them taken to a funeral home or church. Instead, most families will spend up to 48 hours with the deceased in their home, with a simple sheet draped over them or a simple coffin for them to lay in.During this time, family and friends visit the home and enjoy food and drink together, hold prayer vigils, and celebrate the dead. Many people bring gifts of food or money to the immediate family.

1.1.3. During this time, family and friends visit the home and enjoy food and drink together, hold prayer vigils, and celebrate the dead. Many people bring gifts of food or money to the immediate family.

1.2. Day of the Dead

1.3. One of the most well-known traditions that Mexico has in regards to its dead is the Day of the Dead. The holiday actually begins on October 31st and concludes on November 2nd.

1.4. During this time, it is believed that the souls of the deceased return to their families to be with them again. The holiday is meant to celebrate this return.

1.5. Throughout the holiday, loved ones go to great lengths to ensure that the souls of their loved ones feel welcome upon their return. Altars are set up in homes and throughout the community with ofrendas, or offerings, of all of the deceased’s favorite foods and drinks, new toys for the children, alcohol for the adults, marigolds, candles, and more.

1.6. This holiday is yet another reflection of the Catholic Church’s influence on Mexican funeral traditions, as it’s related to the Roman Catholic holiday All Saint’s Day as well as All Soul’s Day.

2. 1. Pre-Hispanic Era: Heterogenous, included polytheism, human penance and savagery.

3. 2. New Hispanic Period: Introduction of catholicism and defying the old Pre Hispanic rules.

4. 3. Independent Mexico: Free of religious training, the most unfortunate individuals began to visit their dead on the Day of the Dead; burial grounds turned into the epicenter of people celebrations and journeys, with gastronomic, drunkard, melodic and sexual abundances.