Guidance and Counseling for the Gifted Sherrie Rabe

Guidance and Counseling for the Gifted Sherrie Rabe

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Guidance and Counseling for the Gifted Sherrie Rabe by Mind Map: Guidance and Counseling for the Gifted         Sherrie Rabe

1. Educational Advocacy for Gifted Students: This article shared that parent were the advocate for their child, including strategies and plans that were effective and that needed work. It discussed how parent worked with their child’s school to implement educational activities for their child that were appropriate. Types of Acceleration and their Effectiveness: These strategies of acceleration include subject acceleration, grade skipping, early entry, telescoping, and radical acceleration. Acceleration is a strategy that can be put in place for gifted individuals that learn most successfully at an advanced pace. The research conducted shows evidence of acceleration aiding in a student’s emotional skills. Along with those skills, acceleration has additionally shown improvement in a student’s academics. I think acceleration is not used to its full advantage, especially in elementary and middle schools. The benefits of acceleration are tremendous. We have GATE classes in elementary and middle, AP and dual enrollment in high school, along with other programs as well. My concerns for acceleration is the lack of it in elementary and middle. I think our education needs to be individualized and that is difficult to do in elementary. Flexibility is the key. References: A Nation Deceived http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/Nation_Deceived/ND_v1.pdf What is Academic Acceleration? Here’s looking at you, Educators. http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/ NAGC Position Statement on Acceleration http://www.nagc.org/sites/default/files/Position%20Statement/Acceleration%20Position%20Statement.pdf Educational Advocacy for Gifted Students http://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database/entry/A10214 Types of acceleration and their effectiveness http://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database/entry/A10487

2. Highly gifted children are very different from each other so there is no single ability to look for even when they are performing; besides that, a child's greatest gifts could be outside the academic world's definition of achievement and so go unrecognized altogether. Reference: Giftedness As Asynchronous Development by Stephanie S. Tolan Asynchronous

3. We need to help our students understand that a good leader lets others have ideas and input and doesn’t always make all the decisions. We must show them different aspects of leadership such a assisting, delegating and facilitating instead of doing all the work themselves. We can show students how to work cooperatively instead of being ‘bossy.’ Our responsibilities are to provide opportunities at home or within the community for leadership skills to surface. References: Authentic Character Development – Beyond Nature and Nurture Vicky Frankfourth MoyleFrom Hafenstein, Kutrumbos, Delisle (Eds.). (2005). Perspectives in Gifted Education: Vol. 3. Complexities of Development, Spirituality and Hope (Fall, pp.33-59). University of Denver, Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Ricks Center for Gifted Children. Growing Up Gifted: Developing the Potential of Children at School and at Home (8th Edition) by Barbara Clark Leadership National Association for Gifted Children Leadership | National Association for Gifted Children Social Adjustment and Peer Pressures for Gifted Children, Rimm, S. 2003 http://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database/entry/A10125 7 Habits of Highly Successful Teens https://www.education.com/magazine/article/Ed_7_Habits_Successful/

4. I want to develop divergent thinkers in the hope they will enjoy the process and not just work toward a finished product. Educators should encourage divergent thinkers to enjoy the process of working rather than the results of their work (Lovecky, 2011). References: Clark, Barbara. Growing up Gifted: Developing the Potential of Children at School and at Home. Pearson, 2013. Sword, Lesley. “Post | SENG - Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted.” SENG, www.sengifted.org/post/emotional-intensity-in-gifted-children.

5. Give frequent opportunities to learn with intellectual peers Actively engaged in learning that is complex, challenging and meaningful. References: Growing Up Gifted: Developing the Potential of Children at School and at Home (8th Edition) by Barbara Clark Common Sense Media Good Will Hunting - Movie Review

6. Parenting, Family Dynamics and Advocating

7. Opportunities in Education Placement

8. Supporting Social Skills and Leadership Development

9. Strength, Rick Factors and Resiliency

9.1. Given this as a gift – the world can be challenging and effective if the gifted learn how to develop in a positive way Insightful allows exceptional reasoning ability, we must help their ability to share themselves with others and still retain their essential self Freedom to allow respect, esteem, approval, dignity and self-respect Time with time, their focus can be toward assisting others, living an inspired life Encouragement children need protection, safety, security, love and a sense of belonging Dichotomy gifted adults may reflect on the meaning, purpose and satisfaction of attempts, effort and opportunities – both positive and negative References Gifted Kids at Risk: Who's Listening? Updated: Jan 12 Patricia A. Schuler. Post | SENG - Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted Growing Up Gifted: Developing the Potential of Children at School and at Home (8th Edition) Barbara Clark Risk-Taking and Risk-Making: Understanding when less than perfection is more than acceptable James R. Delisle https://www.sengifted.org/post/risk-taking-and-risk-making-understanding-when-less-than-perfection-is-more-than-acceptable i

10. Personality Variance and Special Populations

11. Understanding the Gifted

12. Development and Experience of Gifted Students