PROBLEM: Sherlock Holmes must trick Moriarty by surviving a fall off the roof of St. Bartholomew’...

Computational Thinking Flowchart by Lori Ruso

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PROBLEM: Sherlock Holmes must trick Moriarty by surviving a fall off the roof of St. Bartholomew’s Hospital building in London. How does he decide upon the safest landing device? by Mind Map: PROBLEM: Sherlock Holmes must trick Moriarty by surviving a fall off the roof of St. Bartholomew’s Hospital building in London. How does he decide upon the safest landing device?

1. References: Rushkoff, D. (2012, November 13). Code literacy: A 21st century requirement. Edutopia. Retrieved from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/code-literacy-21st-century-requirement-douglas-rushkoff Wolfram, S. (2016 September 7). How to Teach Computational Thinking. Wired. Retrieved from https://www.wired.com/2016/09/how-to-teach-computational-thinking/ Yadav, Stephenson, Hong. (2017, April). Computational Thinking For Teacher Education. Communications of the ACM. Retrieved from https://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2017/4/215031-computational-thinking-for-teacher-education/fulltext?mobile=false Use of photos purchased from: Fanpop, Inc. © 2006-2019. All Rights Reserved. A Member of Townsquare Entertainment News. http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/sherlock-holmes-sherlock-bbc1/images/37200095/title/funny-sherlock-icon

2. 2. PATTERNS: As Sherlock reviews the site-specific data and landing device data he's collected, he must search for patterns, trends, and/or regularities in order to determine which landing device would function most safely at his specific fall site.

2.1. Pattern Rationale: Sherlock's search for patterns in the site-specific and landing device data exemplifies the computational thinking concept of pattern recognition because in order to achieve his intended goal of landing safely, he must not merely accept the data at face value, he must "begin to engage critically and purposefully with them [the data] instead." (Rushkoff, 2012, p. 3) To successfully survive his intended fall off of the building, it is imperative that Sherlock carefully analyze any corresponding data between the site-specific data & landing device data he's collected.

2.2. Pattern Recognition Task #1 Sherlock's site-specific data includes the following: St. Bartholomew Hospital building's height is approximately 50 feet. The surface type on the street in front of the building is asphalt concrete. Regarding the proximity of structures to the front of the building: There are two-12ft. sidewalks on either side of the street's 4 traffic lanes (48ft.), totaling 72ft. of space.

2.3. Pattern Recognition Task #2 Sherlock's landing device data includes the following: -Bunjee Chords: -recreational use over water -unsafe next to tall buildings -not used by fire & rescue depts. -Safety Nets: -used for 10ft falls or less -used with 10 or more handlers -no longer used by fire & rescue departments Inflatable Rescue Jump Cushions: -easy to inflate -safest method available -current go-to method used by fire & rescue depts.

2.4. Pattern Recognition Task #3 After carefully analyzing his collected data, Sherlock learns that the bunjee chord device would place his fall too close to the hospital building & most likely he'd be killed. He also learns that since his building is 50ft. tall, & safety nets fail to catch people falling from heights exceeding 1-story buildings, he would not survive the fall using a net. This leaves him to consider the inflatable rescue jump cushions: Historically, these devices have been successfully used for safely catching falling occupants from 50ft-tall buildings which works for his situation. When inflated, it would fit well within the 72ft. of available street space below him.

2.4.1. Safest ethod ailable

3. 3. ALGORITHM: Sherlock now endeavors to design a step-by-step set of instructions that he will follow in order to acquire the safest landing device to use for his fall off St. Bartholomew's Hospital building in London.

3.1. Algorithm Rationale: Sherlock’s desire to create a repeatable, step-by-step process for choosing the safest landing device to use when falling off the hospital building exemplifies the computational thinking concept of algorithm development because in order to survive his intended fall of the building, he must compile, and carefully follow, this procedural list of specific actions derived from his data analysis. These steps are not arrived at randomly, and "understanding algorithms [his rules] as a set of precise steps provides the basis for understanding..." (Yadav, Stephenson, Hong, 2017, p. 2) Without a specific list of steps to follow, Sherlock increases the probability of not surviving the fall. By creating & closely following his ordered list of instructions, Sherlock increases his understanding of the risks involved & how to reduce them.

3.2. Sherlock's Steps For Choosing the Safest Landing Device For His Fall off St. Bartholomew's: Step 1 - Choose place on roof from which to fall. Step 2 - Measure & record the height of the building. Step 3 - Measure & record the distance between the building and other structures surrounding it. Step 4 - Determine the type of street surface beneath the building. Step 5 - Purchase a professional grade inflatable rescue jump cushion in a size which corresponds to the building height/fall distance.

4. 1. DECOMPOSITION: Sherlock must break down data into smaller, more manageable parts: He must determine site-specific information and research different landing devices so that he may choose and use the safest device.

4.1. Decompositon Rationale: Sherlock's situation exemplifies the computational thinking concept of decomposition because in order to survive his intended fall off the building, he must utilize this first step of "debugging" his intended action, that is, he needs to gather data about the site-specifics and landing devices. This will enable him to choose the safest landing device for his particular situation and gain an absolute "understanding if it produces the right thing" (Wolfram, 2016, p. 24) In this scenario, the "right thing" is that the landing device he chooses must enable him to survive his fall off of St. Bartholomew's Hospital building in London.

4.2. Decomposition Tasks Sherlock needs to gather site-specific data, including the height of the hospital building, the type of surface directly below the building, and the distance between the building and other structures. Then he must learn about the different types of landing devices that are used to save people who fall off, or out of, tall buildings and which of these landing devices is the safest to use in his situation.

5. 4. ABSTRACTION: Considering his legion of fans, Sherlock decides to publish a step-by-step set of instructions, in the form of a brochure, explaining how he determined the safest landing device. It is now important for Sherlock to decide which data to discard and which data is fundamentally necessary. Hence, he removes the non-essential data and identifies the general principles which generated the useful patterns that emerged from his collected data.

5.1. Abstraction Rationale: Sherlock's computational thinking requires him to peruse his data in order to identify what's useful and to discard what isn't. This exemplifies the computational thinking concept of abstraction because his ability to decipher only the most accurate data will enable him to survive his intended fall off the building. Abstracting the data will enable him "to strip away complexity in order to reduce an artifact [his survival plan] to its essence." (Yadav, Stephenson, Hong, 2017, p. 2) As Sherlock accurately extracts important data and disregards the unnecessary information, he discards the unsafe landing device data & focuses upon the data which correlates with the safest landing device. In this case, his life depends upon his ability to abstract the data correctly. He also utilizes the useful data by creating a how-to brochure for his fans.

5.2. Abstraction Task #1 Filter Out Unsuitable Data: -Bunjee Chord -too dangerous to use over a concrete landing surface beside a tall building -Safety Net: -too dangerous to use because the building height exceeds safety net strength -the net requires too many handlers -the building he falls off of is too close -not used by fire & rescue depts. *Sherlock decides not to use either of these devices.

5.3. Abstraction Task #2 Generalize Necessary Details: -Inflatable Rescue Jump Cushions -easy to inflate -available in a size which is able to accommodate falls from a 50ft. tall building -are the current go-to method used by fire & rescue departments *Based upon his research data, Sherlock chooses the safest landing device, the inflatable rescue jump cushion.

5.4. Abstraction Task #3 Sherlock then creates an ordered list of instructions with the data in the form of a brochure. Here is a transcript of the published brochure shared with his fans: "Sherlock Holme's Guide: How I Chose the Safest Landing Device For My Fall Off St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in London" Step 1 - Measure & record the height of the hospital building. Step 2 - Measure & record the distance between the hospital building and other structures surrounding it. Step 4 - Determine the type of surface beneath the hospital building. Step 5 - Purchase a professional grade, officially issued, inflatable rescue jump cushion in the size which corresponds to the hospital building’s height (50 ft.)

5.5. (Moriarty's reaction to Sherlock's genius level computational thinking skills)