How contract law works

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How contract law works by Mind Map: How contract law works

1. By: Evelyn Tadros. (June 2017)

2. Contract

2.1. Agreement

2.1.1. Two parties

2.2. Validity

2.2.1. Acceptance

2.2.2. Intention

2.2.3. Consideration

2.2.4. Legal capacity

2.2.5. Consent

2.2.6. Legality

2.3. Legally Binding

3. Written?

3.1. It's better

3.1.1. Less disputes

3.2. How?

3.2.1. Listing terms

3.2.2. Signing

3.2.3. Placing dates

3.3. Keep documents

3.3.1. Quotations

3.3.2. Invoices

3.3.3. Receipts

4. Elements

4.1. Values

4.1.1. Acceptance

4.1.2. Price

4.1.3. Legality

4.1.4. Understanding

4.1.5. Consent

4.2. Acceptance

4.2.1. Offer

4.2.2. Agreement

4.2.3. or Withdrawal

4.2.3.1. Changes

4.2.3.2. Further discussions

4.2.3.3. Prior

4.2.4. Offeree agrees

4.2.4.1. Offeror too

4.2.5. Unequivocal

4.3. Legal relations

4.3.1. Law

4.3.1.1. No family

4.3.1.2. No friends

4.3.1.3. Must be written

4.4. Consideration

4.4.1. Promise

4.4.2. Deeds

4.4.2.1. Exception

4.4.3. More than money

4.5. Legal capacity

4.5.1. Mental impairment

4.5.1.1. Genuine consent

4.5.1.1.1. Is a MUST

4.5.1.1.2. if not

4.5.2. Young people

4.5.2.1. Under 18 years

4.5.2.2. Necessaries

4.5.2.2.1. Reasonable lifestyle

4.5.2.3. Recover money

4.5.2.3.1. Avoid further payments

4.5.3. Bankrupts

4.5.3.1. Can be done

4.5.3.2. Not deprived

4.5.4. Corporations

4.5.4.1. Artificial body

4.5.4.2. has Legal existence

4.5.4.3. Alow

4.5.4.3.1. Contractual relations

4.5.5. Prisoners

4.5.5.1. Can be done

4.5.5.2. There is

4.5.5.2.1. Censorship

4.5.5.2.2. Supervision

4.6. Consent

4.6.1. Genuine

4.6.2. Affected by

4.6.2.1. Mistake

4.6.2.1.1. When signer fails

4.6.2.2. Misrepresentation

4.6.2.2.1. Remedies

4.6.2.2.2. Types

4.6.2.3. Duress

4.6.2.3.1. Violence

4.6.2.3.2. Forced

4.6.2.3.3. Unlawful pressure

4.6.2.3.4. No alternative

4.6.2.3.5. It's voidable

4.6.2.4. Unconscionability

4.6.2.4.1. Improper advantage

4.6.2.4.2. Solutions:

4.6.2.4.3. Unjust contracts

4.6.2.5. Unfair contract terms

4.6.2.5.1. Standart form

4.6.2.5.2. Causes imbalance

4.6.2.5.3. Causes detriment

4.7. Ilegal and void

4.7.1. Crime

4.7.2. Promote corruption

4.7.3. Defraud the revenue

4.7.4. Restraint of trade

4.7.5. Are generally void

4.7.5.1. Unenforceable

4.7.6. Money may be

4.7.6.1. Recoverable

5. Breach

5.1. Failure

5.1.1. Time-frame

5.2. Unwillingness

5.3. Remedies

5.3.1. Nominal damages

5.3.1.1. Loss

5.3.2. Seek orders

5.3.2.1. Court

5.3.3. Termination

5.3.3.1. Specific rights

5.3.3.2. Repudiation

5.3.3.3. Fails

5.3.3.3.1. Essential tasks

5.3.3.4. No benefits

6. Ending

6.1. Performance

6.1.1. Obligations fulfilled

6.2. Agreement

6.2.1. Contingent condition

6.2.1.1. Not fulfilled

6.3. Frustation

6.3.1. No ability

6.3.2. Force majeure

6.3.2.1. No control

7. Terms

7.1. Conditions

7.1.1. Most important

7.2. Construction

7.2.1. Context

7.2.2. Purpose

7.2.3. Language

7.2.3.1. No Subjectiveness

7.3. Types

7.3.1. Express terms

7.3.2. Inferred terms

7.4. Court's considerations

7.4.1. Condition (Essential)

7.4.2. Warranty (Non-essential)

7.5. Signed documents

7.5.1. Bounded

7.6. Unsigned documents

7.6.1. Reasonable notice

7.7. Incorporation

7.7.1. Universal terms

7.7.1.1. e.g. arguably

7.7.2. Generic terms

7.7.2.1. e.g. duty in services

7.7.3. Ad hoc basis

7.8. Interpretation

7.8.1. Ordinary meaning

7.8.2. Context

7.8.3. Translation's purpose

7.8.4. Background

7.9. Collateral contracts

7.9.1. Separate contract

7.9.2. Main contract condition

7.9.3. Written

7.10. Warranties

7.10.1. Less important

7.10.2. Monetary compensation

7.11. Excluding liability

7.11.1. Exemption clauses

7.11.2. Might be unfair

7.11.3. Read carefully

7.11.4. Avoid Ambiguity

7.11.5. Controled when

7.11.5.1. They are unfair

7.11.6. Faud is prohibited

7.11.7. Penalty

7.11.7.1. Damage clauses

7.11.7.1.1. Pre-estimate

7.11.7.1.2. Unconscionable