VOLUME 2: SEBTS PHD MIND MAP (WWW.EVANGELICALETHICS.COM)

This page contains my seminar level PhD work. You had the broadest education during college (humanities, math, science, etc). Your graduate work then digs into a specific field (theology and ethics). Your seminary doctoral work focuses on specific disciplines (political and theological ethics). You take generic post-graduate level seminars where you write large papers, and then debate colleges. After your seminars, you enter the comprehensive exam, prospectus, and dissertation stages. Your co...

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
VOLUME 2: SEBTS PHD MIND MAP (WWW.EVANGELICALETHICS.COM) by Mind Map: VOLUME 2: SEBTS PHD MIND MAP  (WWW.EVANGELICALETHICS.COM)

1. CHAPTER 3 – INTEGRATIVE

1.1. PHD9101: INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH

1.1.1. PHD9101: Introduction to Research

1.1.2. Notes

1.1.2.1. I. What your potential employer wants to know about what you believe:

1.1.2.1.1. A. My philosophy of Christian education:

1.1.2.2. II. What your future Dean of the Faculty would love for you to know:

1.1.2.2.1. B. Connecting the dots from mission statement to your classroom:

1.1.2.3. III. What the VP for Institutional Effectiveness will require you to know:

1.1.2.3.1. C. Developing the now-famous Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

1.1.2.4. IV. What your students will love you for if you get this:

1.1.2.4.1. D. Current concepts in effective teaching techniques:

1.1.3. Readings

1.1.3.1. A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, abridged edition

1.1.3.1.1. THE COGNITIVE PROCESS DIMENSION

1.1.3.1.2. THE KNOWLEDGE DIMENSION

1.1.3.1.3. THE COGNITIVE PROCESS DIMENSION

1.1.3.2. Bain, What the Best College Teachers Do

1.1.3.2.1. I. INTRODUCTION

1.1.3.2.2. II. WHAT DO THEY KNOW ABOUT HOW WE LEARN?

1.1.3.2.3. III. HOW DO THEY PREPARE TO TEACH?

1.1.3.3. Stavredes, Effective Online Teaching

1.1.4. Handouts

1.1.5. Study Guides

1.1.6. Paper

1.1.6.1. I. INTRODUCTION

1.1.6.1.1. Avignon Captivity + Corruption = Interest in Ecclesiology

1.1.6.1.2. Although Baptists are known in name for the distintive of immersing regenerate believers under water, their most unique contributions are made within the realm of ecclesiology. In the 17th century concerned Puritans established the polity known as Congregationalism.These Puritans would wrestle with additional ecclesiological issues, leading them to argue that church membership belonged only to regenerate church members, which further altered the perception of baptism as being the means to enter membership within the church. Baptists saw themselves as arguing for the fruition of Reformation principles by calling bible-believing Christians to submit not only components of their theology to the sola scriptura principles of the Reformation, but to also submit their church governmental models to the biblical model. Baptists saw themselves as the full extension of the reformation, and argued that our understanding of the church must match the applicational principles of our understanding of salvation. In both, Baptists called believers to construct a theology that reflected the apostolic model presented in the biblical witness. This begs the question whether Baptists were successful in this regard, which demands a deeper analysis of Baptist principles. This paper will argue in favor of the Baptist understanding as reflecting the biblical pattern as presented in four key areas of ecclesiology: (1) The Church, (2) Church Membership, (3) Church Offices, and (4) Church Covenants.

1.1.6.2. II. OUTLINE

1.1.6.3. III. BODY

1.1.6.3.1. A. THE CHURCH

1.1.6.3.2. B. CHURCH MEMBERSHIP

1.1.6.3.3. C. CHURCH OFFICES

1.1.6.3.4. D. CHURCH COVENANTS

1.1.6.4. IV. SUMMARY

1.1.6.5. V. CONCLUSION

1.1.6.6. NOTES

1.1.6.6.1. A. THE CHURCH

1.1.6.6.2. B. CHURCH MEMBERSHIP

1.1.6.6.3. C. CHURCH OFFICES

1.1.6.6.4. D. CHURCH COVENANTS

1.2. PHD9102: INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING

1.2.1. PHD9102: Introduction to Teaching

1.2.2. Notes

1.2.2.1. I. INTRODUCTION

1.2.2.1.1. A. EXCELLENCE

1.2.2.1.2. B. SERTILLANGES' ITS SPIRIT, CONDITIONS, METHODS

1.2.2.2. II. WRITING

1.2.2.2.1. THE WRITING CENTER: JOHN BURKETT & MATT MULLINS

1.2.2.2.2. A. LUKE 1:1-4

1.2.2.2.3. B. WRITING IS A PROCESS

1.2.2.2.4. C. FORMS OF SIGNIFICANCE

1.2.2.2.5. D. WRITING READABLE SENTENCES

1.2.2.2.6. E. PROFESSIONALIZATION

1.2.2.2.7. F. INTELLECTUAL VIRTUES

1.2.3. Readings

1.2.3.1. Sertillanges, The Intellectual Life

1.2.3.1.1. OUTLINE

1.2.3.1.2. SUMMARY

1.2.3.1.3. KEY TERMS

1.2.3.1.4. CRITIQUE

1.2.3.1.5. QUOTES

1.2.3.1.6. QUESTIONS

1.2.3.2. Booth et all, The Craft of Research

1.2.3.2.1. OUTLINE

1.2.3.2.2. SUMMARY

1.2.3.2.3. KEY TERMS

1.2.3.2.4. CRITIQUE

1.2.3.2.5. QUOTES

1.2.3.2.6. QUESTIONS

1.2.3.3. Williams, Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace

1.2.3.3.1. OUTLINE

1.2.3.3.2. SUMMARY

1.2.3.3.3. KEY TERMS

1.2.3.3.4. CRITIQUE

1.2.3.3.5. QUOTES

1.2.3.3.6. QUESTIONS

1.2.4. Handouts

1.2.5. Study Guides

1.3. PHD9201: INTEGRATIVE I

1.3.1. PHD9201: Integrative I

1.3.2. Notes

1.3.2.1. CRITICAL THINKING

1.3.2.1.1. I. PROLEGOMENA

1.3.2.1.2. II. CLASSICAL RHETORIC

1.3.2.1.3. III. CRITICAL THINKING: PROCESS

1.3.2.1.4. IV. FORMAL LOGIC

1.3.2.1.5. V. EXCERCISE

1.3.2.2. FAITH AND SCHOLARSHIP

1.3.2.2.1. INTRODUCTION

1.3.2.2.2. LECTURE

1.3.2.2.3. THE PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

1.3.3. Readings

1.3.3.1. Scruton, Roger. The Face of God.

1.3.3.1.1. "Friends walk side by side while lovers walk face to face" (C.S. Lewis)

1.3.3.1.2. OUTLINE

1.3.3.1.3. SUMMARY

1.3.3.1.4. KEY TERMS

1.3.3.1.5. CRITIQUE

1.3.3.1.6. QUOTES

1.3.3.1.7. QUESTIONS

1.3.3.2. Augustine, On Christian Doctrine

1.3.3.2.1. OUTLINE

1.3.3.2.2. SUMMARY

1.3.3.2.3. KEY TERMS

1.3.3.2.4. CRITIQUE

1.3.3.2.5. QUOTES

1.3.3.2.6. QUESTIONS

1.3.3.3. Clark, David. To Know and Love God.

1.3.3.3.1. OUTLINE

1.3.3.3.2. OUTLINE

1.3.3.3.3. SUMMARY

1.3.3.3.4. KEY TERMS

1.3.3.3.5. CRITIQUE

1.3.3.3.6. QUOTES

1.3.3.3.7. QUESTIONS

1.3.4. Handouts

1.3.5. Study Guides

1.3.6. Paper

1.3.6.1. LIEDERBACH PAPER

1.3.6.1.1. I. INTRODUCTION

1.3.6.1.2. II. OUTLINE

1.3.6.1.3. III. BODY

1.3.6.1.4. IV. SUMMARY

1.3.6.1.5. V. CONCLUSION

1.3.6.1.6. Personal Reflection (40%): Each student will write a researched personal reflection paper derived from interaction with the reading material found in Virtuous Minds, On Christian Doctrine and the Reading Packet Material. This paper (15 page max) is to be a reflection on and initial development of what the student believes to be the essential elements of what a Christian view of scholarship ought to be and how these ideas will shape his or her scholarship as it relates to writing, teaching and mentoring. Note: This Assignment intentionally overlaps with the previous assignment to facilitate learning.

1.3.6.2. ASHFORD PAPER

1.3.6.2.1. NOTES

1.3.6.2.2. I. INTRODUCTION

1.3.6.2.3. II. BODY

1.3.6.2.4. III. SUMMARY

1.3.6.2.5. IV. CONCLUSION

1.4. PHD9202: INTEGRATIVE II

1.4.1. PHD9202: Integrative Seminar II

1.4.2. Notes

1.4.2.1. CHURCH HISTORY

1.4.2.1.1. I. INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY IN GENERAL

1.4.2.1.2. II. INTRODUCTION TO CHURCH HISTORY AS A DISCIPLINE

1.4.2.1.3. III. WHY CHURCH HISTORY MATTERS

1.4.2.1.4. IV. RECOMMENDED RESOURCES

1.4.2.1.5. V. FOOTNOTES

1.4.3. Readings

1.4.3.1. Behr, John. Formation of Christian Theology: The Way to Nicaea

1.4.3.1.1. PART ONE: THE GOSPEL OF JESUS CHRIST

1.4.3.1.2. PART TWO: THE WORD OF GOD

1.4.3.1.3. PART THREE: THE SON OF THE FATHER

1.4.3.2. Behr, John. Formation of Christian Theology: The Nicene Faith

1.4.3.2.1. PART ONE: TRUE GOD OF TRUE GOD

1.4.3.2.2. PART TWO:ONE OF THE HOLY TRINITY

1.4.3.2.3. EPILOGUE

1.4.3.3. Lindberg, Carter. The European Reformations

1.4.3.3.1. I. HISTORY, HISTORIOGRAPHY, AND INTERPRETATIONS OF THE REFORMATIONS

1.4.3.3.2. II. THE LATE MIDDLE AGES: THRESHOLD AND FOOTHOLD OF THE REFORMATIONS

1.4.3.3.3. III. THE DAWN OF A NEW ERA

1.4.3.3.4. IV. WAIT FOR NO ONE: IMPLEMENTATION OF REFORMS IN WITTENBERG

1.4.3.3.5. V. FRUITS OF THE FIG TREE: SOCIAL WELFARE AND EDUCATION

1.4.3.3.6. VI. THE FORMATION OF THE COMMON MAN

1.4.3.3.7. VII. THE SWISS CONNECTION: ZWINGLI AND THE REFORMATION IN ZURICH

1.4.3.3.8. VIII. THE SHEEP AGAINST THE SHEPHERDS: THE RADICAL REFRORMATIONS

1.4.3.3.9. IX. AUGSBURG 1530 TO AUGSBURG 1555: REFORMS AND POLITICS

1.4.3.3.10. X. "THE MOST PERFECT SCHOOL OF CHRIST": THE GENEVAN REFORMATION

1.4.3.3.11. XI. REFUGE IN THE SHADOW OF GOD'S WINGS: THE REFORMATION IN FRANCE

1.4.3.3.12. XII. THE BLOOD OF THE MARTYRS: THE REFORMATION IN THE NETHERLANDS

1.4.3.3.13. XIII. THE REFORMATIONS IN ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND

1.4.3.3.14. XIV. CATHOLIC RENEWAL AND THE COUNTER-REFORMATION

1.4.3.3.15. XV. LEGACIES OF THE REFORMATIONS

1.4.3.4. Holifield, E. Brooks. Theology in America

1.4.3.4.1. I. INTRODUCTION: THEOLOGY IN AMERICA

1.4.3.4.2. PART I: CALVINIST ORIGINS

1.4.3.4.3. PART II: THE BACONIAN STYLE

1.4.3.5. O'Donovan, Oliver. Resurrection and Moral Order.

1.4.3.5.1. INTRODUCTION

1.4.3.5.2. PART I: THE OBJECTIVE REALITY

1.4.3.5.3. PART II: THE SUBJECTIVE REALITY

1.4.3.5.4. PART III; THE FORM OF THE MORAL LIFE

1.4.3.6. Wright, N.T. After You Believe

1.4.3.6.1. 1. WHAT AM I HERE FOR?

1.4.3.6.2. 2. THE TRANSFORMATION OF CHARACTER

1.4.3.6.3. 3. PRIESTS AND RULERS

1.4.3.6.4. 4. THE KINGDOM COMING AND THE PEOPLE PREPARED

1.4.3.6.5. 5. TRANSFORMED BY THE RENEWAL OF THE MIND

1.4.3.6.6. 6. THREE VIRTUES, NINE VARIETIES OF FRUIT, AND ONE BODY

1.4.3.6.7. 7. VIRTUE IN ACTION: THE ROYAL PRIESTHOOD

1.4.3.6.8. 8. THE VIRTUOUS CIRCLE

1.4.3.7. Frame, John. The Doctrine of the Christian Life.

1.4.3.7.1. PART I: INTRODUCTORY CONSIDERATIONS

1.4.3.7.2. PART II: NON CHRISTIAN ETHICS

1.4.3.7.3. PART III: CHRISTIAN ETHICAL METHODOLOGY

1.4.3.7.4. PART IV: THE TEN COMMANDMENTS

1.4.3.7.5. PART V: CHRIST AND CULTURE

1.4.3.7.6. PART 6: PERSONAL SPIRITUAL MATURITY

1.4.3.8. Beach & Niebuhr, Christian Ethics

1.4.3.8.1. I. INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL ETHICS

1.4.3.8.2. II. ETHICS OF THE EARLY CHRISTIAN CHURCH

1.4.3.8.3. III. CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA

1.4.3.8.4. IV. ST. AUGUSTINE

1.4.3.8.5. V. ETHICS OF MONASTICISM

1.4.3.8.6. VI. ETHICS OF MYSTICISM

1.4.3.8.7. VII. THOMAS AQUINAS AND SCHOLASTICISM

1.4.3.8.8. VIII. MARTIN LUTHER

1.4.3.8.9. IX. JOHN CALVIN

1.4.3.8.10. X. ETHICS OF PURITANISM AND QUAKERISM

1.4.3.8.11. XI. JOSEPH BUTLER AND ANGLICAN RATIONALISM

1.4.3.8.12. XII. JOHN WESLEY

1.4.3.8.13. XIII. JONATHAN EDWARDS

1.4.3.8.14. XIV. SOREN KIERKEGAARD

1.4.3.8.15. XV. WALTER RAUSCHENBUSCH

1.4.3.9. Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith

1.4.3.9.1. OUTLINE

1.4.3.10. Henry, God Revelation and Authority Vol. I

1.4.3.10.1. 1. THE CRISIS OF TRUTH AND WORD

1.4.3.10.2. 2. THE CLASH OF CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

1.4.3.10.3. 3. MYTH AND REVELATION

1.4.3.10.4. 4. THE WAYS OF KNOWING

1.4.3.10.5. 5. THE RISE AND FALL OF LOGICAL POSITIVISM

1.4.3.10.6. 6. THE COUNTERCULTURAL REVOLT

1.4.3.10.7. 7. THE JESUS MOVEMENT AND ITS FUTURE

1.4.3.10.8. 8. SECULAR MAN AND ULTIMATE CONCERNS

1.4.3.10.9. 9. THE MEANING OR MYTHS MAN LIVES BY

1.4.3.10.10. 10. THEOLOGY AND SCIENCE

1.4.3.10.11. 11. THEOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY

1.4.3.10.12. 12. IS THEOLOGY A SCIENCE?

1.4.3.10.13. 13. THE METHOD AND CRITERIA OF THEOLOGY (I) -- REVELATION: THE BASIC EPISTEMOLOGICAL AXIOM

1.4.3.10.14. 14. THE METHOD AND CRITERIA OF THEOLOGY (II) -- THE ROLE OF REASON, SCRIPTURE, CONSISTENCY AND COHERENCE

1.4.3.10.15. 15. EMPIRICAL VERIFICATION AND CHRISTIAN THEISM

1.4.3.10.16. 16. MAN'S PRIMAL RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE

1.4.3.10.17. 17. A PRIORI EXPLANATION OF RELIGION

1.4.3.10.18. 18. THE PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSCENDENT A PRIORI (I)

1.4.3.10.19. 19. THE PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSCENDENT A PRIORI (II)

1.4.3.10.20. 20. THE THEOLOGICAL TRANSCENDENT A PRIORI

1.4.3.10.21. 21. THE PHILOSOPHIC TRANSCENDENTAL (CRITICAL) A PRIORI

1.4.3.10.22. 2. REFLECTIONS ON RELIGIOUS APRIORISM

1.4.3.11. Lindbeck, The Nature of Doctrine: Religion and Theology in a Postliberal Age

1.4.3.11.1. 1. THEORY, ECUMENISM, AND CULTURE: THE PROPOSAL IN CONTEXT

1.4.3.11.2. 2. RELIGION AND EXPERIENCE: A PRETEOLOGICAL INQUIRY

1.4.3.11.3. 3. MANY RELIGIONS AND THE ONE TRUE FAITH

1.4.3.11.4. 4. THEORIES OF DOCTRINE

1.4.3.11.5. 5. TESTING THE THEORY: CHRISTOLOGY, MARIOLOGY, AND INFALLIBILITY

1.4.3.11.6. 6. TOWARD A POSTLIBERAL THEOLOGY

1.4.3.12. McGrath, The Open Secret

1.4.3.12.1. OUTLINE

1.4.3.12.2. ESSAYS

1.4.3.13. Peterson, Philosophy of Religion

1.4.3.13.1. ESSAY

1.4.4. Handouts

1.4.5. Study Guides

1.4.6. Papers

1.4.6.1. CHURCH HISTORY

1.4.6.1.1. ESSAY 1

1.4.6.1.2. ESSAY 2

1.4.6.2. ETHICS

1.4.6.2.1. ESSAY 1

1.4.6.2.2. ESSAY 2

2. CHAPTER 4 – LANGUAGES

2.1. GEN9310: SEMINAR IN GERMAN