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CB by Mind Map: CB

1. Lesson 1

1.1. How customers obtain, consume, dispose

1.2. Types of segmentation variables

1.2.1. Geographic

1.2.1.1. Region

1.2.1.2. City size

1.2.1.3. Density

1.2.1.4. Climate

1.2.2. Demographic

1.2.2.1. Age

1.2.2.2. Family size

1.2.2.3. Family life cycle

1.2.2.4. Gender

1.2.2.5. Income

1.2.2.6. Occupation

1.2.2.7. Education

1.2.2.8. Religion

1.2.2.9. Race

1.2.2.10. Nationality

1.2.2.11. Generation

1.2.3. Psychographic

1.2.3.1. Lifestyle (Activities, interests, opinions)

1.2.3.2. Values

1.2.3.3. Personality

1.2.3.4. Social class

1.2.4. Behavioral

1.2.4.1. Occasions

1.2.4.2. Benefits sought

1.2.4.3. User status

1.2.4.4. Usage rate

1.2.4.5. Brand loyalty

1.2.4.6. Readiness stage

1.2.4.7. Attitude towards product

1.3. Primary research methods (Done by you or your company)

1.3.1. Surveys

1.3.2. Focus groups

1.3.3. Interviews

1.3.4. Observations

1.3.5. Experiments

1.4. Secondary research methods (Done by someone else outside your company)

1.4.1. Internet

1.4.2. Magazines

1.4.3. Newspapers

2. Lesson 2

2.1. Need recognition

2.1.1. Routinized response behavior

2.1.1.1. Low complexity

2.1.1.2. Well-established set of criteria (Price/features/durability)

2.1.1.3. Few alternatives

2.1.1.4. Little or no information needed

2.1.1.5. Low impact on financial

2.1.1.6. High frequency of purchase

2.1.2. Limited problem solving

2.1.2.1. Medium complexity

2.1.2.2. Some basic criteria (Price/features/durability)

2.1.2.3. Moderate number of alternatives

2.1.2.4. Moderated number of information needed

2.1.2.5. Mid range impact on financial cost

2.1.2.6. Moderate frequency of purchase

2.1.3. Extended problem solving

2.1.3.1. High complexity to solve the problem

2.1.3.2. No criteria established (Price/features/durability)

2.1.3.3. Many alternatives

2.1.3.4. A lot of information required

2.1.3.5. High impact on financial cost

2.1.3.6. Low frequency of purchase

2.2. Information search

2.2.1. Internal sources

2.2.1.1. Memory

2.2.1.2. Past experiences

2.2.2. External sources

2.2.2.1. Marketing information (Ads)

2.2.2.2. Non-commercial

2.2.2.2.1. Internet

2.2.2.2.2. Friends

2.2.2.2.3. Family

2.2.2.2.4. Co-workers

2.2.2.2.5. Act of shopping

2.3. Evaluation of alternatives

2.3.1. Evoked set

2.3.1.1. Acceptable brands

2.3.2. Inept set

2.3.2.1. Unacceptable brands

2.3.3. Inert set

2.3.3.1. Indifferent brands

2.3.4. Overlooked brands

2.3.5. Unknown brands

2.3.6. Decision making rules

2.3.6.1. Attribute related (Evaluation criteria such as price)

2.3.6.1.1. Compensatory rule

2.3.6.1.2. Non-compensatory rule

2.3.6.2. Non-attribute related

2.3.6.2.1. Affect referral rule

2.4. Purchase

2.4.1. Trial

2.4.2. Repeat

2.4.3. Long term commitment

2.5. Post purchase

2.5.1. Neutral feeling

2.5.2. Satisfaction

2.5.3. Dissatisfaction (Cognitive dissonance)

2.5.3.1. Strategies to reduce cognitive dissonance

2.5.3.1.1. Increase the desirability of the purchase (Paying special attention to good reviews of the product he bought)

2.5.3.1.2. Decrease the desirability of the rejected alternatives (Realizing that product that was not bought would not be compatible)

2.5.3.1.3. Decrease the importance of purchase decision

2.5.3.1.4. Reverse purchase decision

3. Lesson 3 (Culture)

3.1. Where can it be seen from?

3.1.1. Beliefs

3.1.2. Values

3.1.3. Behavior

3.2. Forms of cultural learning

3.2.1. Formal (Learning from elders in family)

3.2.2. Informal (Imitating others)

3.2.3. Technical (Taught by teachers)

3.3. Acquisition of culture

3.3.1. Enculturation (Learning of one's own culture)

3.3.2. Acculturation (Learning of new or foreign culture)

3.4. Hofstede cultural dimension

3.4.1. Power distance index

3.4.2. Individualism vs colllectivism

3.4.3. Masculinity vs feminity

3.4.4. Uncertainty avoidance

3.5. Multinational marketing strategies

3.5.1. Global

3.5.2. Mixed (Customized product + Uniform message)

3.5.3. Mixed (Uniform product + Customized message)

3.5.4. Local strategy

4. Lesson 4 (Family and social class)

4.1. Household life cycle

4.2. Household decision making roles

4.2.1. Influencer

4.2.2. Gatekeeper

4.2.3. Decider

4.2.4. Buyer

4.2.5. Preparer

4.2.6. User

4.2.7. Maintainer

4.2.8. Disposers

4.3. Conflict resolution

4.3.1. Bargaining (Reaching a compromise)

4.3.2. Impression management (Misrepresenting facts)

4.3.3. Use of authority (Using superior expertise or role)

4.3.4. Reasoning (Using logical argument)

4.3.5. Playing on emotions (Capitalizing on others feelings)

4.3.6. Additional information

4.4. Social class

4.4.1. Upper upper class

4.4.2. Nonveu rich

4.4.3. Upper middle class

4.4.4. Lower middle class

4.4.5. Upper lower class

4.4.6. Working poor

4.4.7. Underclass

5. Lesson 5 (Communication)

5.1. Types of communication

5.1.1. Impersonal communication (One-way)

5.1.2. Interpersonal communication (Two-way)

5.1.3. Interactive (Can be both one-way or two-way)

5.2. Sender

5.2.1. Informal source (Parent or friends giving advice)

5.2.2. Formal source (Brand owners)

5.2.3. Normative reference groups (Families and friends)

5.2.4. Comparative reference groups (Celebrities)

5.3. Message

5.3.1. Elements in message structure

5.3.1.1. Advertising resonance

5.3.1.2. Message framing

5.3.1.2.1. Positive

5.3.1.2.2. Negative

5.3.2. Persuasive advertising appeals

5.3.2.1. Celebrity

5.3.2.2. Comparative

5.3.2.3. Fear

5.3.2.4. Humour

5.3.2.5. Sexual

5.3.2.6. Timeliness

5.3.2.7. Audience participation

5.4. Channels of communication

5.4.1. Traditional media (TV, Radio)

5.4.2. Non-traditional media (Online and mobile media)

5.5. Receiver

5.5.1. Central route (Provide complete information)

5.5.2. Peripheral route (Lesser information)

6. Lesson 6

6.1. Needs

6.1.1. Innate needs (Food, water, clothing etc)

6.1.2. Acquired needs (Learned from parents)

6.1.3. Maslow hierarchy of needs)

6.1.4. McClelland's Three Needs Theory

6.1.4.1. Need for achievement

6.1.4.2. Need for power

6.1.4.3. Need for affiliation

6.1.5. Arousal of motives

6.1.5.1. Physiological arousal

6.1.5.2. Emotional arousal

6.1.5.3. Cognitive arousal

6.1.6. Goals

6.1.6.1. Positive

6.1.6.2. Negative

6.1.6.3. Primary

6.1.6.4. Substitute

7. Lesson 7

7.1. Freudian theory of personality

7.1.1. id

7.1.2. ego

7.1.3. superego

7.2. Neo-freudian theory of personality

7.2.1. Compliant

7.2.2. Aggressive

7.2.3. Detached

7.3. Trait theory

7.3.1. Consumer innovativeness

7.3.2. Consumer materialism

7.3.3. Need for cognition

7.4. Self-images

7.4.1. Actual

7.4.1.1. How I really see myself

7.4.2. Ideal

7.4.2.1. How I would like to see myelf

7.4.3. Social

7.4.3.1. How I think others see me

7.4.4. Ideal social

7.4.4.1. How I want others to see me

7.4.5. Expected

7.4.5.1. How I expect myself to be in the future

7.4.6. Ought-to self

7.4.6.1. How I think I need to be

7.5. Extending the self

7.5.1. Actual physical extension

7.5.1.1. Allowing a person to accomplish tasks that would otherwise be too difficult to do

7.5.2. Symbolically

7.5.2.1. Transforming a person to a symbol

7.5.3. Bestowing feelings of immortality

7.5.3.1. Making part of the self live on in an object

7.6. Brand personality

7.6.1. Sincerity

7.6.2. Excitement

7.6.3. Competence

7.6.4. Sophistication

7.6.5. Ruggedness

8. Lesson 8

8.1. Perceptual selection

8.1.1. Selective exposure

8.1.2. Selective attention

8.1.2.1. Sensory stimuli

8.1.2.1.1. Sights

8.1.2.1.2. Sounds

8.1.2.1.3. semells

8.1.2.1.4. Taste

8.1.2.1.5. Touches

8.1.2.2. Sensory receptors

8.1.2.2.1. Eyes

8.1.2.2.2. Ears

8.1.2.2.3. Nose

8.1.2.2.4. Tongue

8.1.2.2.5. Skin

8.2. Perceptual organisation

8.2.1. Figure and ground

8.2.2. Closure

8.2.3. Similarity

8.2.4. Proximity

8.3. Perceptual interpretation

8.3.1. Physical appearance

8.3.2. Descriptive terms

8.3.3. First impressions

8.3.4. Halo effect

9. Lesson 9 (Learning)

9.1. Classical conditioning

9.2. Operant conditioning

9.2.1. Positive reinforcement

9.2.2. Positive punishment

9.2.3. Negative reinforcement

9.2.4. Negative punishment

9.3. Observational learning

9.4. Cognitive learning

10. Lesson 10 (Attitude)

10.1. Functional Theory of attitude

10.1.1. Utilitarian

10.1.2. Ego-defensive

10.1.3. Value expressive

10.1.4. Knowledge function

10.2. Sources of attitude formation

10.2.1. Personal experience

10.2.2. Family and friends

10.2.3. Mass media

10.2.4. Direct marketing

10.3. Components of attitude

10.3.1. Affective (Feelings)

10.3.2. Behavioural (Actions)

10.3.3. Cognitive (Beliefs)

10.4. Hierarchy of effects

10.4.1. Standard learning (Cognition, affect, behavioural)

10.4.2. Low involvement (Cognition, Behavioural, Affect)

10.4.3. Experiential (Affect, Behavioural, Cognition)

10.5. Changing Affective component

10.5.1. Using classical conditioning

10.6. Changing Behavioural component

10.6.1. Using operant conditioning

10.7. Changing cognitive component

10.7.1. Capitalize on relative advantage

10.7.2. Strengthen perceived attribute linkage

10.7.3. Add a new attribute

10.7.4. Influence competitors' ratings

11. Lesson 11

11.1. Approaches to innovation

11.1.1. Firm oriented

11.1.2. Product oriented

11.1.3. Market oriented

11.1.4. Consumer oriented

11.2. Types of innovations

11.2.1. Continuous innovation

11.2.2. Dynamically continuous innovation

11.2.3. Discontinuous innovation

11.3. Product characteristics that influence diffusion of innovation

11.3.1. Relative advantage

11.3.2. Compatability

11.3.3. Complexity

11.3.4. Trialability

11.3.5. Observability

11.4. Adopter categories

11.4.1. Innovators

11.4.2. Early adopters

11.4.3. Early majority

11.4.4. Late majority

11.4.5. Laggards

11.5. Adopter process

11.5.1. Awareness

11.5.2. Interest

11.5.3. Evaluation

11.5.4. Trial

11.5.5. Adoption

12. Lesson 13

12.1. Company social responsibility

12.1.1. Economic responsibilities

12.1.2. Legal responsibilities

12.1.3. Ethical responsiblities

12.1.4. Philanthropic responsibilites

12.2. Covert marketing

12.2.1. Disguised communicator

12.2.1.1. Poser

12.2.1.2. Buzz and viral marketing

12.2.2. Disguised format

12.2.2.1. Advetorial

12.2.2.2. Urgent ad formation

13. Lesson 12

13.1. Digital shopper segments

13.1.1. Shopaholic

13.1.2. Researcher

13.1.3. Savers

13.1.4. Skeptics

13.2. e-SERVQUAL model

13.2.1. Efficiency

13.2.2. Fulfillment

13.2.3. Reliability

13.2.4. Security and privacy

13.2.5. Responsiveness

13.2.6. Compensation

13.2.7. Contact