WIT Presentation

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WIT Presentation by Mind Map: WIT Presentation

1. We learned smoking at work is bad, so we changed our environment.

1.1. Toxic work environments are as dangerous to health as second-hand smoke, argues Jeffrey Pfeffer, a professor at Stanford Graduate School of Business, in his latest book, “Dying for a Paycheck”.

1.1.1. Workplace stress -- the result of conditions like long hours, little autonomy on the job, high job demands -- don't just hit productivity or damage morale. They're killing us.

2. Theme: Understanding the Importance Of Knowing Your Customers For Effective Leadership.

2.1. "how we apply empathy and soft skills to a tech environment."

2.2. Placeholder title: An Effective Leader Treats their Teams Like They Would their Customers

2.3. Description from Shilpi

2.3.1. When it comes to effectively leading teams and creating a supportive environment, look no further than how would you treat your customers.

2.3.2. Product Management generally falls back on three principles to serve customers and end users: Develop Empathy, Establish Trust and Build a Long-term Value Exchange. These same principles can be applied in building an efficient, high-performing team.

2.3.3. Often, managers think inefficiencies in their teams lie in resource constraints, challenging timelines or better estimates. In reality, a lot of these issues can be alleviated by understanding your team's personality, enabling cross-functionality, and increasing transparency. In other words, help them help you.

2.4. 3 key takeaways:

2.4.1. 1) Understanding your team's motivations and pain points are as important as understanding your customer's pain points

2.4.2. 2) Gain your team's trust through clear ownership and transparency

2.4.3. 3) Ensure growth and commitment in your teams by offering them a value exchange that motivates and inspires them

3. Outline

3.1. 1. Start by making your audience care, using a relatable example or an intriguing idea.

3.2. 2. Explain your idea clearly and with conviction.

3.3. 3. Describe your evidence and how and why your idea could be implemented.

3.4. 4. End by addressing how your idea could affect your audience if they were to accept it.

4. Workplace Stress is Killing People

4.1. People spend a good chunk of their lives at work. Most are unhappy during this time.

4.1.1. The average American spends 90,000 hours at work over their lifetime.

4.1.2. 80% of US workers are outright dissatisfied with their jobs.

4.1.2.1. Job engagement, according to Gallup, is low. Distrust in management, according to the Edelman trust index, is high. Job satisfaction, according to the Conference Board, is low and has been in continual decline.

4.1.3. A quarter of Americans say work is their No. 1 source of stress.

4.1.4. Workplace stress -- the result of conditions like long hours, little autonomy on the job, high job demands -- don't just hit productivity or damage morale. They're killing us.

4.1.4.1. Stanford professor Jeffrey Pfeffer book Dying for a Paycheck

4.1.4.1.1. Jeffrey Pfeffer contends that many modern management commonalities such as long work hours, work-family conflict, and economic insecurity are toxic to employees—hurting engagement, increasing turnover, and destroying people’s physical and emotional health—and also inimical to company performance.

4.1.4.1.2. You don’t have to do a physically dangerous job to confront a health-destroying, possibly life-threatening, workplace.

4.1.4.1.3. While we've dramatically lowered physical accidents and safety issues in the workplace, the health impacts of social or stress-related work conditions have remained unaddressed.

4.1.4.1.4. “Simply put, employers can make decisions to improve people’s lives in fundamentally important ways. Or, alternatively, employers can, either intentionally or through ignorance and neglect, create workplaces that literally sicken and kill people.” (Pfeffer, 2018)

4.1.4.1.5. Toxic work environments are as dangerous to health as second-hand smoke, argues Jeffrey Pfeffer, a professor at Stanford Graduate School of Business, in his latest book, “Dying for a Paycheck”.

4.1.4.1.6. His early works looked at organisational design and how it sapped employee productivity rather than enhanced it.

4.1.4.2. 120,000 deaths per year attributed to stressful workplace conditions

4.1.4.3. That would make the workplace the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S. -- higher than Alzheimer's, higher than kidney disease.

4.1.4.3.1. Show chart of leading causes of death

4.1.4.4. Cause approximately $190 billion in incremental health care costs.

4.1.4.5. Job stress costs US employers more than $300 billion annually.

4.1.4.6. An Uber software engineer making a six-figure income killed himself in 2016, with his family blaming workplace stress. A 21-year-old Merrill Lynch intern collapsed and died in London after working 72 hours straight. When Arcelormittal closed a steel plant that it had taken over, a 56-year old employee died of a heart attack three weeks later. His family said it was the shock. And the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work has reported that over half of the 550 million working days lost annually from absenteeism “are stress related”.

4.1.4.7. “According to the Mayo clinic, your supervisor is more important to your health than your family doctor,”

4.1.4.8. The World Economic Forum estimates that some three-quarters of health-care spending worldwide is for chronic disease and non-communicable diseases account for 63 percent of all deaths. Chronic disease comes from stress and the unhealthy behaviours such as smoking, drinking, taking drugs and overeating that stress induces. Numerous surveys show that the workplace is a leading cause of stress, and it is thus one important cause of the health care crisis.

4.1.4.9. Not surprisingly, stressed employees are more likely to quit – and turnover is expensive.

4.1.4.10. In 2016 an Uber software engineer making a six-figure income took his own life. His family blamed workplace stress. A 21-year-old Merrill Lynch intern collapsed and died in London after working 72 hours straight. When Arcelormittal closed a steel plant that it had taken over, a 56-year old employee died of a heart attack three weeks later. His family said it was the shock. And the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work has reported that over half of the 550 million working days lost annually from absenteeism “are stress related”.

5. INTRO

5.1. What's something everyone watching this presentation today has in common? We're all customers. All of us. We all have customer experiences.

5.1.1. Examples of good and bad customer experiences

5.1.1.1. Some of these experiences are great, like a a trip to Disney World. Some of these experiences are soul-crushing, like waiting in line at the DMV.

5.1.2. Examples of being a customer (clothes, food, product, etc)

5.1.3. Great companies recognize how important a great customer experience is. They manage to feel like they "get you" and understand your needs.

5.1.3.1. Examples of how companies "get you"

5.1.3.1.1. Netflix recommendations

5.1.3.1.2. Lifestyle brands

5.1.3.2. Most companies understand how valuable it is to understand their customers.

5.1.3.2.1. Examples of techniques used to understand customers

5.1.3.2.2. Statistic of success for companies that invest in customer experiences

5.1.3.2.3. Marketers today use an arsenal of sophisticated tools and techniques from analyzing Facebook likes and tweets to going into customers homes and watching them interact with their products to building what they literally call Customer Journey Maps, which are detailed diagrams of every touchpoint the customer has with the customer, all to understand what makes buying difficult and how they can make it easier.

5.2. Improving customer experience is often a top business priority, but what about the people responsible for building and driving these experiences?

5.2.1. Companies spend 1000x less on employee satisfaction ($750 million). And it shows.

5.2.1.1. Job engagement, according to Gallup, is low. Distrust in management, according to the Edelman trust index, is high. Job satisfaction, according to the Conference Board, is low and has been in continual decline.

5.2.1.1.1. Gallup has found that a staggering 87% of employees worldwide are not engaged, but companies with highly engaged workforces outperform their peers by 147% in earnings per share.

6. BODY

6.1. I’d argue that companies already know how to improve employee experience: All they have to do is apply to their HR practices the principles of customer experience design that their marketing and operations teams probably already use.

6.1.1. Design Thinking

6.1.1.1. Design thinking is a human-centered method of creative problem-solving that provides stakeholders, product teams, and leaders with a thorough understanding of their users so that they can ideate, prototype, and test user-centered solutions.

6.2. Empathize

6.2.1. Conduct research to better understand your team from their perspective.

6.2.1.1. Surveys

6.2.1.2. Customer/Employee Journey Maps

6.2.1.2.1. Designers, Marketers, PMs, we all think about the customer journey: how to engage them early before they’re ready to become customers, how to nurture them over time to be top of mind when they have intent to purchase, how to keep them happy and ultimately convert them from lurkers to likers to lovers.

6.2.1.3. Personas

6.2.1.3.1. Customer personas are fictional characters used by teams to represent different types of customers. They’re often given names and bios including their likes, dislikes, pains and objectives based on data collected from customer feedback, interviews and focus groups. The idea is that having a few fictional customers that represent larger interest groups allows you to gain more empathy and optimize processes for a wider audience.

6.2.1.4. Focus Groups

6.2.2. The golden rule is to treat everyone as you'd like to be treated. But not everyone feels and thinks the same as you do. I encourage you to instead treat everyone as they would like to be treated. It takes time and practice to build this empathy.

6.3. Define

6.3.1. Use your research to observe your team's needs and current pain points.

6.4. Ideate

6.4.1. Dream. Imagine what the future Employee Experience ideally looks like for your organization. Create your ideal state, taking into account the insights generated earlier.

6.5. Prototype

6.6. Test

7. Importance of Treating Employees like Customers

7.1. Traditionally, big corporations used to see their employees mainly as the ‘workforce’ responsible for the product. This old, outdated perspective needs to change as soon as possible as expanded access to knowledge and the spread of cross-functional roles, means that employees today are much more than just a production unit – and they know it.

7.2. Instead, employees are the first innovation drivers of a company and are the absolute keys to its future success. If you want your company to be successful as much tomorrow as it is today, you have to find ways to retain the talent that is working for you. To achieve this, it is pivotal to create a positive and engaging company culture. You need to inspire your employees continuously. Define new paths and workflows. Get them enthralled by a culture that attracts the vital drive of humans beings. If you create room, where each individual can discover his or her meaning of live and connect it with the companies purpose, you will truly unleash their potential.

7.3. companies that invested the most on Employee Experience had a 180% higher stock price over a 5-year period versus S&P 500 (ex. Adobe, Facebook, Microsoft)

7.4. engaging employees leads to a better workplace and increased customer satisfaction. Basically, engaged and happy employees make it easier to have engaged and happy customers.

7.5. Having a great employee experience is also about evolving and adjusting to meet the needs of employees as situations change.

8. HOW TO DO IT

8.1. The idea (or ideal) that experience design can be applied to almost anything in our world in something of a cliche. However, there is truth in this. A good percentage of our daily activities result in an experience. And, that experience can be designed.

9. CONCLUSION

9.1. "I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” — Maya Angelou

9.2. Business leaders have a golden opportunity - they can understand and shape employee journeys the same way they do customer journeys. In fact they can do it even better because they have more touchpoints with employees than with customers.

9.2.1. It’s not easy, it takes time, energy, and some often very uncomfortable conversations about what’s really going on in the organization, but it’s critical. We can bridge these gaps, but only if we’re more thoughtful about the experiences we create for each other.

10. PRESENTATION OUTLINE

10.1. 1. Intro

10.2. 2. Customer Experience

10.2.1. How we measure it

10.3. 3. Employee Experience

10.3.1. Empathize

10.3.1.1. Employee Journey Maps

10.3.1.2. Personas, DiSC Profiles, etc

10.3.1.3. Surveys

10.3.1.4. Team Retrospectives

10.3.2. Define