THE CRISIS OF SOCIAL REPRODUCTION AND THE END OF WORK

THE CRISIS OF SOCIAL REPRODUCTION AND THE END OF WORK

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THE CRISIS OF SOCIAL REPRODUCTION AND THE END OF WORK by Mind Map: THE CRISIS OF SOCIAL REPRODUCTION AND THE END OF WORK

1. Over the past four decades, there has been a dramatic increase in income inequality, resulting in a large mass of people at the base and a shrinking number of people at the top.

1.1. The three areas of reproductive work

1.1.1. Social reproduction

1.1.1.1. The set of tasks that, together, maintain and reproduce life, both daily and generation after generation.

1.1.1.1.1. It consists of

1.1.1.1.2. The analysis insists on

1.1.1.1.3. It has been placed

1.2. In producing and maintaining workers, reproductive work demands to be considered the basis of global capitalism.

1.2.1. Endnotes points out that there are three areas in operation

1.2.1.1. Directly mediated by the market

1.2.1.2. The remunerated and indirectly mediated by the market

1.2.1.3. The unpaid and indirectly mediated by the market

1.2.1.4. The three P's

1.2.1.4.1. Privatized reproductive work (directly mediated by the market)

1.2.1.4.2. Public (remunerated and indirectly mediated by the market)

1.2.1.4.3. Personnel (unpaid and indirectly mediated by the market)

1.3. Reproductive work in crisis

1.3.1. Some elements of social reproduction are increasingly delegated to an over-exploited class of cleaners, nannies and other social workers (often women involved in global care chains).

1.3.1.1. In the absence of public provision, social reproduction is falling into the privatized or personal spheres in a way that is deeply marked by income inequality.

1.4. The supply of reproductive work is usually quite unstable given the high turnover rate in this field.

1.4.1. Growing need for support due to the need for more people to work longer hours to survive, in addition to the higher costs involved in this support by outsourcing social reproduction to the market, rather than to the state.

1.4.1.1. In addition, the supply of reproductive work is often quite insecure, given the high turnover rate in this field

1.5. Towards a care economy

1.5.1. The services sector is a difficult category to manage that is losing its descriptive usefulness, although a better approach could break down the economy according to different types of services rather than theorizing it as a continuous chain of sectors.

1.5.1.1. Reproductive jobs

1.5.1.1.1. Health care, education, food services, housing and social work as a percentage of all paid work

1.6. Solving the crisis

1.6.1. Social reproduction is increasingly in crisis (with demands for its services growing at the same time, paid workers are facing dangerously low wages and poor working conditions).

1.6.1.1. Nancy Fraser, proposes three models of ideal type to solve these problems.

1.6.1.1.1. Each of these models organizes care in a different way and has variable impacts on ideas of justice and gender equality.

1.6.1.1.2. The universal sustainer model

1.6.1.1.3. The Caregiver's Parity Model

1.6.1.1.4. The model of the universal caregiver

1.6.1.1.5. Post-working model