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Basic Concepts of Chemistry by Mind Map: Basic Concepts
of Chemistry
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Basic Concepts of Chemistry

Nature of Matter

Precision refers to the degree of reproducibility of a measured quantity— that is, the closeness of agreement when the same quantity is measured several times. Accuracy refers to how close a measured value is to the accepted, or actual, value.

Misxtures

Precision refers to the degree of reproducibility of a measured quantity— that is, the closeness of agreement when the same quantity is measured several times. Accuracy refers to how close a measured value is to the accepted, or actual, value.

HOMOGENEOUS MIXTURES

HETEROGENEOUS MIXTURES

Pure Substance

Precision refers to the degree of reproducibility of a measured quantity— that is, the closeness of agreement when the same quantity is measured several times. Accuracy refers to how close a measured value is to the accepted, or actual, value.

Properties of Matter

Precision refers to the degree of reproducibility of a measured quantity— that is, the closeness of agreement when the same quantity is measured several times. Accuracy refers to how close a measured value is to the accepted, or actual, value.

Measurement

Precision refers to the degree of reproducibility of a measured quantity— that is, the closeness of agreement when the same quantity is measured several times. Accuracy refers to how close a measured value is to the accepted, or actual, value.

Uncertainties in Scientific Measurements

Precision refers to the degree of reproducibility of a measured quantity— that is, the closeness of agreement when the same quantity is measured several times. Accuracy refers to how close a measured value is to the accepted, or actual, value.  

LAWS OF CHEMICAL COMBINATIONS

Law Of Conservation Of Mass

Law Of Definite Proportions

Law Of Multiple Proportions

Gay-Lussac's Law

Avogadro Law

Under the same conditions of temperature and pressure, equal volumes of different gases contain an equal number of molecules (called Avogadro's number). First proposed by the Italian scientist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 - 1856) in 1811, it became accepted c. 1860. From the law, it follows that the volume occupied by one mole of gas (at standard conditions of 32 °F [0 °C] and 1 atmosphere of pressure) is the same for all gases (0.791 cubic feet [22.4 litres])

Mole and Molar Mass

Stoichiometry