In situ gelling for ocular drug delivery

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In situ gelling for ocular drug delivery by Mind Map: In situ gelling for ocular drug delivery

1. Methods for preparation

1.1. Stimuli responsive in situ gelling system

1.1.1. Temperature

1.1.2. pH

1.2. Osmotically induced in situ gelling system

1.2.1. Ion activated system

1.3. Chemically induced in situ gelling system

1.3.1. Ionic cross linking

1.3.2. Enzymatic cross linking

1.3.3. Photo-polymerization

2. Applications

2.1. Timoptic- XE (Timolol maleate)

2.1.1. Used for open angle glucoma

2.1.1.1. polymer used

2.1.1.1.1. Gellan gum

2.2. Levofloxacin

2.2.1. Used for bacterial conjunctivitis

2.2.1.1. Polymer used

2.2.1.1.1. Chistosan nanoparticles

2.3. Akten (Lidocaine hydrochloride)

2.3.1. Used as ophthalmic local anesthesia

2.3.1.1. Polymer used

2.3.1.1.1. Hidroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HMPC)

2.4. Azasite

2.4.1. Used for bacterial conjunctivitis

2.4.1.1. Polymer used

2.4.1.1.1. Poloxamer 407

2.5. Bromide tartrate

2.5.1. Used for open angle glucoma & ocular hypertension

2.5.1.1. Polymer used

2.5.1.1.1. Carbapol 974 & HMPC

3. Advantages

3.1. Increases the bioaviliability

3.2. Prolongs the drug effect

3.3. Patient compliance

3.4. Decreases blurred vision

3.5. Accurate and reproducible quantitiies

4. Disadvantages

4.1. Requires high level of fluids

4.2. Toxicity due to the organic solvents used

4.3. Rapid drug release may occur before the polymer solidifes

4.4. Only drugs with small doses can be used

5. Defintion

5.1. Liquid formulation generating a solid or semi solid depot after administration. It is a blend of drug and biodegradable polymers dissolved in organic solvent