Cyberbullying

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
Cyberbullying by Mind Map: Cyberbullying

1. Definitions

1.1. “Cyberbullying is cruel to others by sending or posting harmful material or engaging in other forms of social aggression using the Internet or other digital technologies” (Willard, 2007, as cited in Redmond et al., 2018, p.2)

1.2. An “aggressive, intentional act carried out by a group or individual, using electronic forms of contact, repeatedly and over time against a victim who cannot easily defend him or herself” (Smith et al., 2008, as cited in Redmond et al., 2018, p.2)

1.3. “Cyberbullying involves the use of information and communication technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behaviour by an individual or group, which is intended to harm others” Belsey, 2014, as cited in Redmond et al., 2018, p.2)

1.4. “Willful and repeated harm inflicted through the use of computers, cell phones, and other electronic devices” (Patchin and Hinduja, 2010, as cited in Redmond et al., 2018, p.2)

2. Where it happens

2.1. Text messages

2.2. Social media

2.3. Email

2.4. Instant Messaging

3. Effects of Cyberbullying (Redmond et al., 2018, p2).

3.1. Reduced academic achievement

3.2. Decreasing school attendance

3.3. Feelings of embarrassment

3.4. Fear

3.5. Anxiety

3.6. Anger

3.7. Frustration

3.8. Increased stress

3.9. Depression

3.10. Reduced self esteem

3.11. Social withdrawal or exclusion

3.12. Increased use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs

3.13. Suicidal ideation or action

4. Anti-Cyberbullying Measures (Willard, 2016, as cited in Redmond et al., 2018).

4.1. Participatory planning

4.2. Needs assessment

4.3. Implement Anti-bullying/cyberbullying Campaign

4.4. Review policy and procedures

4.5. Conduct professional development

4.6. Provide parent education

4.7. Provide student education

4.8. Evaluate programs

5. Intervention Strategies (Redlock et al. 2018, p3).

5.1. Save evidence

5.2. Conduct a threat assessment

5.3. Assess response options

5.4. Identify the perpetrators

5.5. Support the victim

5.6. Provide guidance (to all parties)

5.7. Use Information-resolution strategies

6. Anti-Cyberbullying Programs/Resouces (Redmond et al. 2018, p3).

6.1. Netsmartz Workshop

6.2. eSafety

6.3. Steps to respect

6.4. Bullying. No Way!

7. Types of Cyberbullying (Redmond et al. 2018, p6).

7.1. Cyberstalking

7.2. Denigration

7.3. Excluding

7.4. Flaming

7.5. Harrassing

7.6. Impersonating

7.7. Outing

7.8. Trickery

8. Signs Victims May Display (Afzal, 2016, as cited in Redmond et al., 2018, p.6)

8.1. Nervousness after receiving a text or being online

8.2. Faking illness

8.3. Emotional changes

8.4. Unwillingness to share information about online activities

8.5. Changed social group

8.6. Failing grades

9. Digital Citizenship/Education (Tools across Areas of Digital Life)

9.1. Positive/respectful behaviour

9.2. Safety & wellbeing

9.3. Content production & copyright

9.4. Security

9.5. Privacy & reputation

9.6. Information Quality

9.7. Civic & political engagement