Application of theory to nurses providing care to patients receiving continuous renal replacement...

Application of theory to nurses providing care to patients receiving continuous renal replacement theory [CRRT] in intensive care unit settings

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Application of theory to nurses providing care to patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy [CRRT] in intensive care unit settings by Mind Map: Application of theory to nurses providing care to patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy [CRRT] in intensive care unit settings

1. Situated Learning Theory

1.1. Developed by: Jean Lave

1.2. View of Knowledge: Knowledge is attained through presentation of real life scenarios, case studies, and simulation

1.3. View of Learning: Students focus on learning so that it may be applied practically in future clinical practice. Emphasis is not on memorization, but rather synthesis.

1.4. Role of the Student: Students should understand what and why the information presented is pertinent, so they can use it in their nursing practice.

1.5. Role of the Educator: Educators should design classroom experiences such as case studies, simulations, and role play to facilitate learning.

1.6. How Theory Informs Instruction: Educators, specifically unit based educators, should create simulation and case study experiences to facilitate nurses in the CRRT learning process. Examples first!

1.7. References: Billings, D. M. G., & Halstead, J. A. (2020). Teaching in nursing: A guide for faculty. Elsevier.

2. Adult Learning Theory

2.1. Developed by: Malcolm Knowles

2.2. View of Knowledge: Adults already possess a rich variety of life experiences from which to draw from, new knowledge can be built readily off this previous knowledge.

2.3. View of Learning: Course materials should be tailored to the learning needs of the adult learner. Independent learning is encourages so adults can self pace, reflect, and blend their previous and new knowledge.

2.4. Role of the Student: Adult learners are presumed to be self directed, thus play a heavily active role in their own education. They can use faculty as mentors while figuring out their own learning needs.

2.5. Role of the Educator: Educators and preceptors remain the "experts" on the subject, but the relationship while working with an adult learner is a more collaborative one, where the two work together to determine and achieve the learning goals. Additionally, the educator must provide a safe space for the adult learner to feel comfortable and accepted.

2.6. How Theory Informs Instruction: Adult learning theory implores ICU RNs to have a collaborative relationship with their preceptors while learning to care for CRRT patients. Active participation in the learning process from the ICU nurse learning the skill will help build upon the knowledge they already possess.

2.7. References: Clapper, Timothy C. “Beyond Knowles: What Those Conducting Simulation Need to Know about Adult Learning Theory.” Clinical Simulation in Nursing, vol. 6, no. 1, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2009.07.003.

3. Experiental Learning Theory

3.1. Developed by: Carl Rogers

3.2. View of Knowledge: Knowledge is more easily attainable when meaningful to the learner

3.3. View of Learning: Learning occurs when students come into contact with practical or pertinent problems

3.4. Role of the Student: To be motivated, self driven, and open to new ideas and shifts in perspective

3.5. Role of the Educator: To create a positive & nonthreatening environment for learning to occur, to facilitate students in their purpose for learning, and to encourage sharing of thoughts and education without becoming overbearing.

3.6. How Theory Informs Instruction: Nurses working in the ICU should presumably be motivated to care for critically ill patients. The need to learn is highly pertinent! Therefore, the role of the preceptor or nurse educator is to provide a safe environment for the nurse to learn to provide safe care. The educator should strive to provide organized and pertinent information, but allow the student to be self motivating in their learning.

3.7. Reference: Rogers, C.R. (1969). Freedom to Learn. Columbus, OH: Merrill.

4. Sociocultural Learning Theory

4.1. Developed by: Lev Vygotsky

4.2. View of Knowledge: Knowledge is attained when built off previous learning.

4.3. View of Learning: Learning often occurs in the "zone of proximal development" - where a student has solved as much of the problem he or she can, but now needs assistance to move through the rest of the lesson.

4.4. Role of the Student: To communicate and collaborate with their instructor and other students, to play an active role and be self aware of their progress in the learning process.

4.5. Role of the Educator: To assist students through the zone of proximal development as they learn and slowly withdraw support as the student becomes more proficient in a skill or topic.

4.6. How Theory Informs Instruction: Nurses in the ICU first learning CRRT will require frequent monitoring, education, and support as they learn to care for these patients. Initially, preceptors and / or educators should be prepared to fully shadow and engage with their students as they learn. As learning progresses, they can remove the "scaffolding" in place, and allow their students to provide care more independently.

4.7. References: Billings, D. M. G., & Halstead, J. A. (2020). Teaching in nursing: A guide for faculty. Elsevier.