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Compare and contrast diverse social and economic structures within the societies of Aboriginal, French and British peoples in pre-Confederation Canada by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues: by Mind Map: Compare and contrast diverse social and economic structures
within the societies of Aboriginal, French and British peoples in
pre-Confederation Canada by exploring and reflecting upon the
following questions and issues:
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Compare and contrast diverse social and economic structures within the societies of Aboriginal, French and British peoples in pre-Confederation Canada by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

• What were the different ways in which Aboriginal societies were structured (i.e., Iroquois 
Confederacy, Ojibwa, Mi’kmaq)?

The Iroquois Confederacy people.

The Ojibwa people.

The Mi'kmaq people.

The answer to this question has been linked.

• Who were the key figures in the French exploration and settlement of North America?

Samuel de Champlain: This man was named the "Founder of New France", having discovered Québec, and making it a suitable place for Europeans to live. This happened on July 3, 1608. He was a navigator, cartographer, draughtsman, soldier, explorer, geographer, ethnologist, diplomat, and chronicler.

Samuel de Champlain

Jacques Cartier: This man was a French explorer, who claimed what is now called "Canada" for France. He was the first European to explore and map many places.

Jacques Cartier

King Louis XIV: This man, also known as Louis the Great, or the Sun King, ruled as King of France and Navarre. He reigned King for 72 years and 110 days, being one of the longest reigns of European history.

King Louis XIV

Pierre de Monts: He was a French merchant, explorer, and colonizer. He was a Protestant, and was born in Royan, France.

Pierre de Monts

René Robert Cavalier de la Salle: He was a French explorer. He explored all throughout the Great Lakes region, the United States, Canada, the Mississippi River, and the Gulf of Mexico.

René Robert Cavalier de la Salle

Pierre Radisson: This man was a French - Canadian fur trader and explorer. He is linked very often to his brother - in - law Médard des Groseilliers, who was at the time about 20 years old.

Pierre Radisson

• In what ways did European imperialism impact the social and economic structures of 
Aboriginal societies?

The Europeans meeting with the Aboriginals is shown above. The answer to this question has been linked.

• How did the structures of Aboriginal societies affect decision making in each society 
(i.e., role and status of women, consensus building)?

An Aboriginal meeting. The answer to this question has been linked.

• What were the social and economic factors of European imperialism?

Economics: Europeans set up colonies, so they could get resources from the land by themselves. Mostly, the furs were wanted from what is now known as "Canada". A fashion craze broke out in Europe, and beaver furs were essential for making beaver hats and fur coats. Europeans looked to North America for more beavers, as they became extinct from all the hunting in Europe.

Economics

Religion: Most Europeans were Christians, so like the "followers" of many religions, they believed that there's was one true faith. However, a competition broke out within Christian faith, between the Catholics and the Protestants. Most French people were Catholic, and most English people were Protestant. Both of these religious groups wanted to send "missionaries" around the world, to spread their version of Christianity.

Religion

Competition: Europe was often at war with most other countries, so they competed for land and resources. The more colonies a country controlled, the more prestige, and power they had. These colonies supplied their "home" country with these resources (timber, iron ore, etc.) and they were used to build up European armies and navies.

Competition

Curiosity: The Europeans were curious about what "laid beyond the horizon", so they decided to go explore the open land and sea. This was an important part in expanding their empire. New improvements (such as technology and navigation) were made to help travel farther than ever before in European history.

Curiosity

• How was European imperialism responsible for the development of Acadia, New France and 
British settlements?

Acadia: Pierre de Monts was a receiver of the monopoly sent out to French colonists, and he sailed to North America to set up a colony of his own. With him, he brought along Samuel de Champlain (a map-maker, and explorer.) In 1605, their colony was finally set up: Port Royal on the Bay of Fundy. The area was soon after named "Acadia", due to the word "Arcadia" which was Greek for an earthy paradise. The Mi'kmaq who lived there did not object to the new settlers coming. The French didn't interfere with any fishing or hunting activities, and the Mi'kmaq were willing to trade with them (as long as they weren't denied access.) This was a place for less-fortunate people to have a fresh start.

Acadia, which was founded by Pierre de Monts and Samuel de Champlain.

New France: When Pierre de Monts received the trade monopoly sent out to French traders, he and Samuel de Champlain set out on a journey to create a trading post. After this failed, and the two men separated, Samuel de Champlain was even more determined to succeed. After a lot of time and effort, New France was set up, and people started to settle there. Samuel de Champlain was known as the "Founder of New France".

New France, which was founded by Samuel de Champlain.

British settlements: European imperialism acted as a "role model" for British settlers, as the British followed the European plan to be successful. The British and the French were also highly competitive; they both wanted to be the most powerful people in the world.

A British settlement.

• What role did the British government play in the settlement of North America?

The British Government took the role of sending colonists to try and colonize in North America. Although King James I of England had known they wouldn't have enough money to send all the colonists, he gave permission to send private colonists who were interested. Overall, the British Government played the role of the leaders, and the guiders for British colonists.

The British Government

• What roles did the Royal Government and the Catholic Church play in the social structure of 
New France (i.e., governor, intendant, Jesuits, religious congregations)?

The Royal Government and the Catholic Church played a very big role in the social structure of New France. The Royal Government (example: King Louis XIV) basically controlled all the colonists coming to colonize in New France (the Governor, Intendant, and Bishop.) Also, the Catholic Church helped the Colonists and King Louis XIV both, in a certain way (Jesuits and Religious Congregations.) These are the roles that the Royal Government and the Catholic Church played in the social structure of New France.

A Catholic Church in New France. The answer to this question has been linked.

• Who were the key figures in the British exploration and settlement of North America?

John Cabot: He was an Italian navigator and explorer. This man discovered part of Canada in 1497 under the "commission" of Henry VII.

John Cabot

King Charles: He was the King of England, King of Scotland, and the King of Ireland from March 27, 1625 until his execution in 1649. The last years of his life were represented by the English Civil War, which he used as a tactic to out-smart the people of England.

King Charles

John Guy: He was an English merchant adventurer, colonist, and politician. Guy was the first man to attempt a colony on Newfoundland.

John Guy

Henry Hudson: This man was an English sea explorer and navigator early in the 17th century. Henry Hudson had two attempts at making a path above the Arctic Circle to Cathay.

Henry Hudson

Walter Raleigh: Walter Raleigh was an English aristocrat, writer, poet, soldier, courtier, spy, and explorer. This man was very skilled at whatever he did, as he always pushed himself to be the best. Walter Raleigh was a very talented man.

Walter Raleigh

Henry Kelsey: Also known as "the Boy Kelsey", this man was an English fur trader, explorer, and sailor. He played an important role in establishing the Hudson's Bay Company in Canada. He was also born 1667, and got married in a Southern - East part of London.

Henry Kelsey