Insights into the Cognitive Processes of Student Entrepreneur Lived Experiences

Julien Marchand's conference paper for ACERE

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Insights into the Cognitive Processes of Student Entrepreneur Lived Experiences by Mind Map: Insights into the Cognitive Processes  of Student Entrepreneur Lived Experiences

1. Full title

1.1. Theory Development of How Student Entrepreneurs Think, Learn and Work: Uncovering Deep Insights into the Cognitive Processes of Student Entrepreneur Lived Experiences to Develop a Cue Inventory of Student Entrepreneurship

2. Literature Review

2.1. Common Traits

2.1.1. HEART

2.1.1.1. Locust of control

2.1.1.1.1. 1985_Kets de Vries

2.1.1.1.2. 2007_Essers & Benschop

2.1.1.2. entrepreneurs somehow know how to lead an organization and give it momentum

2.1.1.2.1. can instill highly contagious enthusiasm in an organization

2.1.1.2.2. seductiveness, gamesman- ship, or charisma

2.1.1.2.3. 2012_Tjan, Harrington & Hsieh

2.1.1.2.4. It's their passion that transform their purpose into reality

2.1.1.3. Most entrepreneurs have to experience ups and downs

2.1.1.3.1. 1985_Kets de Vries

2.1.1.4. entrepreneurs have a hard time to work for someone else

2.1.1.4.1. 1985_Kets de Vries

2.1.1.5. Need of Achievement

2.1.1.5.1. 1985_Kets de Vries

2.1.1.5.2. 2007_Essers & Benschop

2.1.2. SMARTS

2.1.2.1. Creative entrepreneurs

2.1.2.1.1. high levels of energy

2.1.2.1.2. great degrees of perseverance and imagination

2.1.2.2. dislike repetitive, routine work

2.1.2.2.1. 1985_Kets de Vries

2.1.3. GUTS

2.1.3.1. willingness to take moderate, calculated risks

2.1.3.1.1. 1985_Kets de Vries

2.1.3.2. the divide between risk takers and risk tolerators

2.1.3.2.1. 2012_Tjan, Harrington & Hsieh

2.1.3.3. when a potential Bill Gates or Mark Zuckerberg drops out of Harvard to follow his dream

2.1.3.3.1. 2012_Tjan, Harrington & Hsieh

2.1.3.3.2. Archetypical vs. Student Entrepreneur?

2.1.4. LUCK

2.1.4.1. most Luck is the result of a Lucky Attitude and a Lucky Network

2.1.4.1.1. 2012_Tjan, Harrington & Hsieh

2.1.4.1.2. It's about making your own luck happen

2.2. “tests for entrepreneurship”

2.2.1. McClelland’s use of the Thematic Apperception Test to assess need for achievement (NAch)

2.2.2. Huefner’s use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in 1996

2.2.3. Gaglio and Katz’s (2001) focus on opportunity recognition.

2.2.4. HSLG test

2.2.5. CBA test

2.3. debate around the teachibility of entrepeneurship to students

2.3.1. Need to develop more refined "cumulative theory and teach it to students in a way that emphasizes learning by doing, which should accelerate student mastery."

2.3.1.1. 2001a_Fiet

2.3.2. there is a limit to what can be taught in entrepreneurship training programmes, and that the only way to learn is through one's own personal experience."

2.3.2.1. Timmons et al. (1987

2.3.3. need more active experience-based, learning approach to teaching entrepreneurship

2.3.3.1. Davies and Gibb (1991)

2.3.4. "If you want to teach people to be entrepreneurs, you can't. If you want to teach people to work for entrepreneurs you could. If you want to encourage entrepreneurship, it should be through some kind of apprenticeship. That would be a wonderful experience "

2.3.4.1. 2004_Aronsson / David Birch

2.4. Cognitive Process of Identities construction

2.4.1. There are "complex processes of identity construction of female ethnic minority entrepreneurs."

2.4.1.1. 2007_Essers & Benschop

2.4.2. lack of research on identities of entrepreneurs whereas "organisational identity" is a mature topic

2.4.2.1. These identities are produced through communication/discussion (discursive) with stakeholders, so the identities "become" instead of "are". " becoming is negotiated with various constituencies."

2.4.2.1.1. 2007_Essers & Benschop

2.4.2.1.2. 2005_Downing

3. Introduction

3.1. Definitions

3.1.1. Entrepreneur

3.1.1.1. Process oriented

3.1.1.1.1. while entrepreneurship is to do with a process of change, emergence and the creation of new value, it is also a process of change and creation for the entrepreneur"

3.1.2. Student Entrepreneur

3.1.2.1. not just as a student attending entrepreneurial classes but conducting business on/near campus or leading a campus enterprise (voluntary association) and simultaneously attending a formal university award courses

3.1.2.1.1. Me!

3.2. Justification of research

3.2.1. The concept of the student entrepreneur is relatively new

3.2.1.1. the study of entrepreneurship is still in its infancy"

3.2.1.1.1. Brazeal and Herbert (1999)

3.2.2. Importance of Entrepreneurship

3.2.2.1. the world is changing, becoming more and more uncertain at the organisational level and at the individual level - moire choices for students

3.2.2.1.1. (Gibb and Cotton, 1998, pp. 8-9)

3.2.2.1.2. 2005_Henry, Hill & Leitch

3.2.2.2. David Birch whose research in the 70s demonstrated that new ventures and SME drived jobs and economy growth. Government started developing programs based on his findings.

3.2.2.2.1. 2004_Aronsson

3.2.3. plethora of academic and popular literature exists on entrepreneurs

3.2.3.1. Some include their recollection as students

3.2.3.1.1. Branson 2009

3.2.3.1.2. Sugar 2011

3.2.3.1.3. Trump 2011

3.2.3.1.4. Ranadive 2011

3.2.4. paucity of research on the cognitive processes that student entrepreneurs use to think, learn and work in the challenging environment of balancing work and study life.

3.2.4.1. REFERENCES?

3.3. Research Question

3.3.1. What is the cognitive processes that student entrepreneurs use to think, learn and work in the challenging environment of balancing work and study life

3.4. Plan

3.4.1. Literature Review

3.4.2. Methodology

3.4.3. Results and Implications

4. Methodology

4.1. add Nvivo

5. Findings & Implications

5.1. list the different signals

5.2. link to double identity construction

5.3. How universities could use tests to identify SE