Structures and Forces

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Structures and Forces by Mind Map: Structures and Forces

1. Combination Structure

1.1. A combination of and 2 of the 3 types of structure (shell, frame and solid structures)

1.1.1. Examples

1.1.1.1. House

1.1.1.1.1. Solid base, hollow, frame for the walls

1.1.1.2. Empire State Building

1.1.1.3. Jail Cell

2. Classifying Structures

2.1. Shell Structures

2.1.1. A hollow structure

2.1.1.1. Uses less material than a solid structure of the same size

2.1.2. Examples

2.1.2.1. Taj Mahai

2.1.2.2. Sky Dome

2.1.2.3. Sydney Opera House

2.2. Frame Structures

2.2.1. A structure made out of parts put together

2.2.1.1. Structural Components

2.2.1.2. Skeleton and Skin

2.2.1.2.1. The skeleton is the frame

2.2.1.2.2. The skin could be a covering but does not help spread out the force

2.2.2. Spreads out the force

2.2.3. Examples

2.2.3.1. Eiffel Tower

2.2.3.2. Greek Parthenon

2.2.3.3. Honey Comb

2.3. Solid Structures

2.3.1. A structure that is usually solid all the way through but may sometimes have small openings

2.3.1.1. Very strong

2.3.1.2. Takes up a lot of resources

2.3.2. Examples

2.3.2.1. Great Wall of China

2.3.2.2. Watermelon

2.3.2.3. CN Tower

3. Forces

3.1. External Forces

3.1.1. Plane of Application

3.1.1.1. The imaginary flat surface the force is being applied on

3.1.1.2. Examples

3.1.1.2.1. Top

3.1.1.2.2. Middle

3.1.1.2.3. Bottom

3.1.2. Point of Application

3.1.2.1. The exact angle in which the force is being applied on

3.1.2.2. Examples

3.1.2.2.1. 90 degrees

3.1.2.2.2. 45 degrees

3.1.2.2.3. 180 degrees

3.1.3. Magnitude

3.1.3.1. How hard the force is being applied

3.1.3.2. Examples

3.1.3.2.1. Heavy Magnitude

3.1.3.2.2. Light Magnitude

3.1.3.2.3. Medium Magnitude

3.1.4. Direction

3.1.4.1. Where the force is coming from

3.1.4.2. Examples

3.1.4.2.1. Push

3.1.4.2.2. Pull

3.1.5. Center of Gravity

3.1.5.1. The point of a structure where most of its mass is located

3.2. Internal Forces

3.2.1. Tension

3.2.1.1. A force that stretches

3.2.1.2. Examples

3.2.1.2.1. Elastic Band

3.2.1.2.2. Wire between two poles

3.2.1.2.3. Tug of War

3.2.2. Compression

3.2.2.1. A force that pushes down or squeezes something together

3.2.2.2. Examples

3.2.2.2.1. Using a yoga ball

3.2.2.2.2. Sitting on a chair

3.2.2.2.3. Standing

3.2.3. Shear

3.2.3.1. A force that pushes in opposite directions and usually tears

3.2.3.2. Examples

3.2.3.2.1. Twizzlers

3.2.3.2.2. Scissors

3.2.3.2.3. Zipper

3.2.4. Torsion

3.2.4.1. A force that twists

3.2.4.2. Examples

3.2.4.2.1. Soccer ball after being kicked really hard

3.2.4.2.2. Dreidle

3.2.4.2.3. Yoyo

4. Different Types of Loads

4.1. Static Load

4.1.1. Dead Load

4.1.1.1. The never changing load of the object itself from gravity

4.2. Dynamic Load

4.2.1. Live Load

4.2.1.1. The weight the dead load has to support

4.2.2. Dynamic Load

4.2.2.1. A load that is unpredictable and is always changing when it is acting on the structure

4.2.2.2. Examples

4.2.2.2.1. Snow

4.2.2.2.2. Rain

4.2.2.2.3. Hail

4.3. Examples

4.3.1. Bridge

4.3.1.1. Dead load: bridge

4.3.1.2. Live load: Cars

4.3.1.3. Dynamic Load: weather

4.3.2. Walking

4.3.2.1. Dead Load: Shoes

4.3.2.2. Live load: feet/legs

4.3.3. Electrical Poles

4.3.3.1. Dead load: Poles

4.3.3.2. Live load: Wires

4.3.3.3. Dynamic Load: Weather