Gender Identity Disorder

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
Rocket clouds
Gender Identity Disorder by Mind Map: Gender Identity Disorder

1. A. Author is Psych Central Staff. I Know this author is knowledgeable because more than one person has worked on this cite. This means I get multiple perspectives put into one. B. The purpose for this cite is to inform people and give information regarding certain mental disorders. There are advertisements for different medical clinics. Yes this information is supported by research. This source is one-sided but I don’t know why you would want it two-side. It is the perspective of doctors. C. This source answers one of my questions very well. I think this source compares very well with all of the other sources I have looked at. I do not think anything important has been left out. No this source does not give me key words that can I further research. D. This site was last updated on May 5, 1014. No the information is not to old. All of the links on this page are working. The references are current I think. This site is very convincing.

1.1. Some of the most common symptoms of Gender Identity Disorder are: 1.A marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and primary and/or secondary sex characteristics or, in young adolescents, the anticipated secondary sex characteristics. 2.A strong desire to be rid of one’s primary and/or secondary sex characteristics because of a marked incongruence with one’s experienced/expressed gender or, in young adolescents, a desire to prevent the development of the anticipated secondary sex characteristics. 3.A strong desire for the primary and/or secondary sex characteristics of the other gender 4.A strong desire to be of the other gender or some alternative gender different from one’s assigned gender. 5.A strong desire to be treated as the other gender or some alternative gender different from one’s assigned gender. 6.A strong conviction that one has the typical feelings and reactions of the other gender or some alternative gender different from one’s assigned gender.

2. What is the biggest challenge when attempting to treat Gender Identity Disorder? How do they treat this Disorder?

2.1. "Gender Identity Disorder." The New York Times. New York Times Company, 13 Feb. 2012. Web. http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/gender-identity-disorder/overview.html

2.1.1. A. Does not give an author. I know its credible because it cites doctors. B. This source is an informational source. Yes there are advertisements. The tone of this writing is serious. Information is supported by Doctors. One-sided. C. This article answers one of my questions. Facts are consistent. No important information is left out. There are key words to help further my research. D. Does not give me any dates. I don’t think it is too old. Not out dated. All links are still working. Not any data.

2.1.1.1. One of the biggest problems with treating Gender Identity disorder is trying to make the person with this disorder acknowledging they are the gender they are. Most people strongly believe they are the opposite gender than what they are. When people finally admit to having this disorder then they can be helped.

2.2. The American Journal of Psychiatry. "CME Activity." PsychiatryOnline. American Psychiatric Association, 1 Aug. 2012. Web. 02 May 2014. <http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleID=1268265>.

2.2.1. A. Not one author there is multiple but the task chair is Dr. Byne. All people writing this have PHD’s. B. Informational site. Yes there are advertisements. The tone is serious. Research is supported by doctors. One-sided but it’s a doctors side. C. Information does answer one of my questions. Nothing is inconsistent with other sites. No information is left out of this article. D. August 1, 2012. This information is not to old not out dated at all. Everything is current. Not any specific data.

2.2.1.1. A way to treat this disorder is to make the person with the disorder believe that he or she is they right gender. That is they first thing they try to do. If they can make the person believe they are the gender they are than they can live without any other treatments other than the occasional meeting with a psychiatrist or psychologist. More times than wanted, though, People go through a sex change and that is the main way to treat it. If the person doesn't believe they are the gender they are then you can do anything for them.

2.3. Fitzgibbons, Richard P. "Child Healing: Gender Identity Disorder." Child Healing: Gender Identity Disorder. Institute for Marital Healing, n.d. Web. 02 May 2014. <http://www.childhealing.com/articles/genderidentitydisorder.php>.

2.3.1. A. Not an author. Credible because backed up by Institute for Marital Healing. B. Informational site. No advertisements. The tone is serious. Information is supported by doctors. One-sided. C. The information answers my question. Facts are provided and they are consistent with other sources. This source does not provide and key words to help further my research. D. No dates. Does not appear as being too old. I do not think it is outdated. All links are working. References and citations are accurate. Not specific data.

2.3.1.1. The sooner you catch the disorder the easier it is to treat. At a young age they have not committed to being any specific gender but as they grow up the gender they want to be starts being implanted in their minds so it is hard to change that.

3. What are some specific things that a person with this disorder have to go through? How is someone diagnosed with this disorder?

3.1. Peggy T. Cohen, Henriette A. Delemarre. "European Journal of Endocrinology." Clinical Management of Gender Identity Disorder in Adolescents: A Protocol on Psychological and Paediatric Endocrinology Aspects. European Society of Endocrinology, n.d. Web. 02 May 2014. <http://www.eje-online.org/content/155/suppl_1/S131.full>.

3.1.1. A. The authors are Henriette A Delemarre-van de Waal and Peggy T Cohen-Kettenis. Both authors have writing awards. They reference doctors in writing. B. Informational site. Not advertisements. Doctors support the authors. One-sided. C. Information does answer my questions. Facts are provided. Nothing important has been left out. Does not provide key words. D. November 1, 2006. Not much research has been done since then so does not seem outdated.

3.1.1.1. A person with this disorder have to face many challenges. They face choosing a mate which is one of the hardest parts. When people have this disorder they believe they are the opposite gender. They will try to choose the same gender as them. Males choose males and female choose females. People with this disorder will often get called homosexuals. People confuse this this disorder with homosexuality, but it is nothing like that. The patients of this disorder actually think they are doing the right thing and they believe they are choosing the opposite gender. People with gender identity disorder also have a very strong erg to remove his or her genitals.

3.2. WebMD. "Gender Identity Disorder." WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 29 Apr. 2014. <http://www.webmd.com/sex/gender-identity-disorder>.

3.2.1. A. This article does not give a specific article. I know its credible because it’s been written by medical doctors. B. This source has a purpose of giving information to people with this disorder. There is advertisements in this site. The tone is serious. Research is supported by research. Article is one-sided. C. This site answers my question. No inconsistent facts. Nothing important has been left out. This site does not give me key words to further my research. D. Does not give me any dates but seems to be recent. Not outdated. Links are working fine. Seems to be current. No Data.

3.2.1.1. Gender disorder is only diagnosed by a type of professional doctor know as a psychiatrist or psychologist. A thorough medical history and psychological exam are performed to rule out other possible causes for the symptoms, such as depression, anxiety, or psychosis. Gender identity disorder is diagnosed when the evaluation confirms the persistent desire to be the opposite sex. In order for someone to be diagnosed with Gender Identity Disorder today, they must exhibit a strong and persistent cross-gender identification (not merely a desire for any perceived cultural advantages of being the other sex).

4. What is Gender Identity disorder? How does it affect a person and the way they act? What are some symptoms?

4.1. Pespective#1. Psych Central Staff. "Gender Dysphoria Symptoms. " Psych Central.com. Psych Central, 01 May 2014. Web. 01 May 2014. <http://psychcentral.com/disorders/gender-dysphoria-symptoms/>

4.2. "Gender Identity Disorder." Psychology Today: Health, Help, Happiness + Find a Therapist. Sussex Publishers, n.d. Web. 02 May 2005. <http://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/gender-identity-disorder>.

4.2.1. A. This website does not give an author. Whoever wrote this article they were backed up by a therapists? B. This source is an informational site. This cite does have advertisements and I do not know if the advertisements were supported by the author or not. The information is supported by research. I think this source is more one-sided but it’s the side of a doctor or therapist. C. The information in this site answers multiple questions. The facts in this site are very similar to other sources. I don’t think anything important was left out of this website. This website does not provide key words. D. This information was written in October 24, 2004. I do think this site could be a little outdated because a lot can change over time but the information still compares well with other sites. There are other references but I don’t know how current they are. I do think the data is convincing even though it is a little outdated.

4.2.1.1. Gender identity disorder (GID) or transsexualism is defined by strong, persistent feelings of identification with the opposite gender and discomfort with one's own assigned sex. People with GID desire to live as members of the opposite sex and often dress and use mannerisms associated with the other gender

4.3. Trimarchi, Maria. "How Gender Identity Disorder Works." HowStuffWorks. HowStuffWorks.com, 25 Feb. 2008. Web. 02 May 2014. <http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/inside-the-mind/human-brain/gender-identity-disorder.htm>.

4.3.1. A. The author is Maria Trimarchi. She has a doctorate degree in psychology. B. This source is an informational source. It gives backgrounds and lots of information. The tone is pretty serious. There are advertisements Hospitals and help centers. This information is supported by the authors own research. Because this site is informational I think it is rightfully a one-sided article. C. This site answers a couple research questions. I don’t think there are any facts that are inconsistent. Nothing that is to important has been left out of this site. This website does provide some key words to further my research. D. This site does not give me any dates for the last update or when it was written. The information in this compares well with other sites and the information is close to the same. All links are working in this site. I do not know it the references are current or not. No data in this site.

4.3.1.1. The basic symptom of Gender Identity Disorder Is a male wants to be a female and females want to be males. They change their clothes to match the opposite gender and add makeup . They change their appearance as much as possible.