Change

comparing the roles and the frameworks for changemakers

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Change by Mind Map: Change

1. Clay Shirky three

1.1. plausible promise

1.2. Acceptable bargain

1.3. effective tool

2. frameworks

2.1. Cynefin

2.1.1. simple - best practice

2.1.2. complicated - good practice

2.1.3. complex - emergent practice

2.1.4. chaos - novel practice

2.2. Agile

2.2.1. Tactical - how do we work?

2.2.2. Strategic - what do we want to achieve?

2.2.3. Cultural - who do we want to be?

2.3. Kotter

2.3.1. 1. Create a Sense of Urgency.

2.3.2. 2. Form a Powerful Coalition.

2.3.3. 3. Create a Vision for Change.

2.3.4. 4. Communicate the Vision.

2.3.5. 5. Remove Obstacles.

2.3.6. 6. Create Short-term Wins.

2.3.7. 7. Build on the Change.

2.3.8. 8. Anchor the Changes in Corporate Culture.

2.4. League of intrapreneurs

2.4.1. Making the Business Case

2.4.2. Negotiating the System

2.4.3. Building Community

2.4.4. Unlocking Resources

2.4.5. Fostering Personal Resilience

3. Roles

3.1. story of stuff

3.1.1. networker

3.1.2. resister

3.1.3. nurturer

3.1.4. investigator

3.1.5. communicator

3.1.6. builder

3.2. ashoka

3.2.1. 1. The office innovator

3.2.2. 2. The corporate catalyst

3.2.3. 3. The silo-buster

3.2.4. 4. The secret change agent

3.2.5. 5. The on-top-of-my-day-jobber

3.2.6. 6. The re-imagineer

3.2.7. 7. The do-it-yourselfer

3.2.8. 8. The closer

4. change models

4.1. systems changers

4.1.1. The craft of collaboration

4.1.2. Vision and Narrative

4.1.3. Theory and practice need to be understood as a double helix.

4.1.4. Systems change involves liminal spaces.

4.1.5. Power and the shape of change - it looks more like a movement.

4.1.6. Leadership - Systemic leaders are unafraid of the unknown.

4.2. Donella Meadows / leverage points

4.2.1. 12. Constants, parameters, numbers (such as subsidies, taxes, standards).

4.2.2. 11. The sizes of buffers and other stabilizing stocks, relative to their flows.

4.2.3. 10. The structure of material stocks and flows (such as transport networks, population age structures).

4.2.4. 9. The lengths of delays, relative to the rate of system change.

4.2.5. 8. The strength of negative feedback loops, relative to the impacts they are trying to correct against.

4.2.6. 7. The gain around driving positive feedback loops.

4.2.7. 6. The structure of information flows (who does and does not have access to information).

4.2.8. 5. The rules of the system (such as incentives, punishments, constraints).

4.2.9. 4. The power to add, change, evolve, or self-organize system structure.

4.2.10. 3. The goals of the system.

4.2.11. 2. The mindset or paradigm out of which the system — its goals, structure, rules, delays, parameters — arises.

4.2.12. 1. The power to transcend paradigms.

4.3. Models from evaluationinnovation

4.3.1. Global

4.3.1.1. 1. “Large Leaps” or Punctuated Equilibrium theory

4.3.1.2. 2. “Policy Windows” or Agenda-Setting theory

4.3.1.3. 3. “Coalition” theory or Advocacy Coalition Framework

4.3.1.4. 4. “Power Politics” or Power Elites theory

4.3.1.5. 5. “Regime” theory

4.3.2. tactical

4.3.2.1. 1. “Messaging and Frameworks” theory

4.3.2.2. 2. “Media Influence” or Agenda-Setting theory

4.3.2.3. 3. “Grassroots” or Community Organizing theory

4.3.2.4. 4. “Group Formation” or Self-Categorization theory

4.3.2.5. 5. “Diffusion” theory or Diffusion of Innovations

5. common themes

5.1. collaboration

5.2. story telling

5.3. Power

5.4. learning journey

5.5. visible actions