Historical Documents Project

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Historical Documents Project by Mind Map: Historical Documents Project

1. The Seven Documents

1.1. Declaration of Independence

1.1.1. 1.) What is the general purpose of this document?

1.1.1.1. To inspire the rebels and to give them a clear reason to fight against the British

1.1.2. 2.) Who was responsible for writing it?

1.1.2.1. The majority of the work was done by Tomas Jefferson.

1.1.3. 3.) What time frame was/is the document significant?

1.1.3.1. July 4th, 1776 was when it was signed, it's significance was in the Revolutionary era

1.1.4. 4.) How is the document structured?

1.1.4.1. The Preamble, the main body of the Declaration seperated by, and the conclusion

1.1.5. 5.) What are the top 5 most important things we need to know about this document?

1.1.5.1. It is one of the documents that forms the US

1.1.5.2. This document recored the first rebellion from Britian for an entire country in 3,000 yars

1.1.5.3. By "All men are created equal" they really didn't mean that everyone has the exact same rights. It wasn't until the '80's or so that it really came true. At least in most people's minds.

1.1.5.4. This was one of the major points that made the US recognized by other countries in the world.

1.1.5.5. It actually wasn't signed on the 4th of July, that's just when it was adopted. It was signed actually in August.

1.2. Northwest Ordinance

1.2.1. 1.) What is the general purpose of this document?

1.2.1.1. To establish the territories that we now know as Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin

1.2.2. 2.) Who was responsible for writing it?

1.2.2.1. Nathan Dane

1.2.3. 3.) What time frame was/is the document significant?

1.2.3.1. 1987

1.2.4. 4.) How is the document structured?

1.2.4.1. It was broken down to an introduction, the main body, and a conclusion.

1.2.5. 5.) What are the top 5 most important things we need to know about this document?

1.2.5.1. It's what formed several states, including the one you are sitting in

1.2.5.2. It was the first place where slavery was illegal in the US.

1.2.5.3. The settlers didn't really listen to the part about sharing the land with the indians

1.2.5.4. It established how a territory becomes a state.

1.2.5.5. This document is now, by and large, obsolete.

1.3. Articles of Confederation

1.3.1. 1.) What is the general purpose of this document?

1.3.1.1. To establish some form of government after the Revolutionary war.

1.3.2. 2.) Who was responsible for writing it?

1.3.2.1. John Dickinson

1.3.3. 3.) What time frame was/is the document significant?

1.3.3.1. Revolutionary War era

1.3.4. 4.) How is the document structured?

1.3.4.1. It is organized into the preamble, articles, and a conclusion.

1.3.4.2. Preamble, Articles 1-13, conclusion

1.3.5. 5.) What are the top 5 most important things we need to know about this document?

1.3.5.1. It failed

1.3.5.2. The Constitution replaced it

1.3.5.3. It was made only for a way to set up a real government.

1.3.5.4. It was hard to replace, as every state had to agree

1.3.5.5. The government couldn't do many things, like tax people

1.4. Constitution

1.4.1. 1.) What is the general purpose of this document?

1.4.1.1. Hold the government under certain rules

1.4.2. 2.) Who was responsible for writing it?

1.4.2.1. Delegates from most of the different states.

1.4.3. 3.) What time frame was/is the document significant?

1.4.3.1. 1787

1.4.4. 4.) How is the document structured?

1.4.4.1. Article 1: Duties and Responsibilities of the Legislative Branch Article 2: Duties and Responsibilities of the Executive Branch Article 3: Duties and Responsibilities of the Judicial Branch Article 4: Restrictions and Liberties concerning the States Article 5: Description of how Amendments may from time to time be added to the Constitution. Article 6: Concerning debts contracted under the previous USA (under the Articles of Confederation), and concerning government loyalty to the Constitution Article 7: Discusses Ratification of the document by the states; Conclusion- Signatures

1.4.5. 5.) What are the top 5 most important things we need to know about this document?

1.4.5.1. It is still in use today

1.4.5.2. The bill of rights was added, it wasn't actually in it at the begining

1.4.5.3. The first thing the government did after being created, was to fix itself.

1.4.5.4. It outlines what we take for granted, our rights

1.4.5.5. Has many additions, called amendments

1.5. Bill of Rights

1.5.1. 1.) What is the general purpose of this document?

1.5.1.1. Protects us from the government and from other people.

1.5.2. 2.) Who was responsible for writing it?

1.5.2.1. James Madison

1.5.2.2. James Madison called for 39 amendments, the basis for the Bill of Rights.

1.5.3. 3.) What time frame was/is the document significant?

1.5.3.1. 1791

1.5.3.2. 1791

1.5.4. 4.) How is the document structured?

1.5.4.1. 10 amendments

1.5.4.2. Amendments 1-10

1.5.5. 5.) What are the top 5 most important things we need to know about this document?

1.5.5.1. These are not our only rights

1.5.5.2. People need to know EXACTLY what these rights are

1.5.5.3. This document is what gives us the "rights" we honor so much.

1.5.5.4. No matter what you hear, your rights can't infringe upon other people's rights

1.5.5.5. Some people want those rights to be taken away, or at least certain parts of them.

1.6. Federalist Papers

1.6.1. 1.) What is the general purpose of this document?

1.6.1.1. Promoted the ratification of the Constitution

1.6.2. 2.) Who was responsible for writing it?

1.6.2.1. James Madison, John Jay, Alexander Hamilton

1.6.3. 3.) What time frame was/is the document significant?

1.6.3.1. 1790's

1.6.4. 4.) How is the document structured?

1.6.4.1. Broken into papers

1.6.5. 5.) What are the top 5 most important things we need to know about this document?

1.6.5.1. It convinced New York, and by extension other states, that we need the Constitution.

1.6.5.2. It explained how the founding fathers thought out each article

1.6.5.3. Madison would later go on to become President of the United States. Jay would become the first Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court. Hamilton would serve in the Cabinet and become a major force in setting economic policy for the US.

1.6.5.4. Some would call it the most significant public-relations campaign in history

1.6.5.5. It persuaded people to support ratification who might otherwise have opposed it.

1.7. Anti-Federalist Papers

1.7.1. 1.) What is the general purpose of this document?

1.7.1.1. To scare people away from a strong, federal government.

1.7.2. 2.) Who was responsible for writing it?

1.7.2.1. Many people, most unnamed.

1.7.3. 3.) What time frame was/is the document significant?

1.7.3.1. 1787-1789

1.7.4. 4.) How is the document structured?

1.7.4.1. Papers, if there is any organization

1.7.4.2. There is no structure.

1.7.5. 5.) What are the top 5 most important things we need to know about this document?

1.7.5.1. There is no collected or organized version of the anti federalist papers, unlike the Federalist Papers.

1.7.5.2. They contain warnings of the dangers of a strong, central government controlling the people.

1.7.5.3. One of the fears was that the president would become king.

1.7.5.4. The articles that comprise the bulk of the Anti federalist papers were not as well read or distributed as the live speeches.

1.7.5.5. Did not have nearly as much effect as the federalist papers.