12th Grade American Government

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
Rocket clouds
12th Grade American Government by Mind Map: 12th Grade American Government

1. Economic Literacy

1.1. Not Applicable

2. Democratic Understanding and Civic Values

2.1. National Idenitity

2.1.1. 12.3.1 Explain how civil society provides opportunities for individuals to associate for social, cultural, religious, economic, and political purposes.

2.1.2. 12.1.3 Explain how the U.S. Constitution reflects a balance between the classical republican concern with promotion of the public good and the classical liberal concern with protecting individual rights; and discuss how the basic premises of liberal constitutionalism and democracy are joined in the Declaration of Independence as "self-evident truths."

2.1.3. 12.3.3 Discuss the historical role of religion and religious diversity.

2.2. Constitutional Heritage

2.2.1. 12.1.1. Analyze the influence of ancient Greek, Roman, English, and leading European political thinkers such as John Locke, Charles-Louis Montesquieu, Niccolò Machiavelli, and William Blackstone on the development of American government.

2.2.2. 12.1.2. Discuss the character of American democracy and its promise and perils as articulated by Alexis de Tocqueville.

2.2.3. 12.4.1. Discuss Article I of the Constitution as it relates to the legislative branch, including eligibility for office and lengths of terms of representatives and senators; election to office; the roles of the House and Senate in impeachment proceedings; the role of the vice president; the enumerated legislative powers; and the process by which a bill becomes a law.

2.3. Civic Values, Rights, and Responsibilities

2.3.1. 12.6.2. Discuss the history of the nomination process for presidential candidates and the increasing importance of primaries in general elections.

2.3.2. 12.6.5. Discuss the features of direct democracy in numerous states (e.g., the process of referendums, recall elections).

2.3.3. 12.6.6. Analyze trends in voter turnout; the causes and effects of reapportionment and redistricting, with special attention to spatial districting and the rights of minorities; and the function of the Electoral College.

3. Knowledge and Cultural Understanding

3.1. Historical Literacy

3.1.1. 12.1.4. Explain how the Founding Fathers' realistic view of human nature led directly to the establishment of a constitutional system that limited the power of the governors and the governed as articulated in the Federalist Papers.

3.1.2. 12.1.5. Describe the systems of separated and shared powers, the role of organized interests (Federalist Paper Number 10), checks and balances (Federalist Paper Number 51), the importance of an independent judiciary (Federalist Paper Number 78), enumerated powers, rule of law, federalism, and civilian control of the military.

3.1.3. 12.1.6. Understand that the Bill of Rights limits the powers of the federal government and state governments.

3.2. Ethical Literacy

3.2.1. Not Applicable

3.3. Cultural Literacy

3.3.1. Not Applicable

3.4. Sociopolitical Literacy

3.4.1. 12.9.3. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of federal, con federal, and unitary systems of government.

3.4.2. 12.9.2. Compare the various ways in which power is distributed, shared, and limited in systems of shared powers and in parliamentary systems, including the influence and role of parliamentary leaders (e.g., William Gladstone, Margaret Thatcher).

3.4.3. 12.9.8. Identify the successes of relatively new democracies in Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the ideas, leaders, and general societal conditions that have launched and sustained, or failed to sustain, them.

3.5. Geographic Literacy

3.5.1. 12.9.1. Explain how the different philosophies and structures of feudalism, mercantilism, socialism, fascism, communism, monarchies, parliamentary systems, and constitutional liberal democracies influence economic policies, social welfare policies, and human rights practices.

3.5.2. 12.9.4. Describe for at least two countries the consequences of conditions that gave rise to tyrannies during certain periods (e.g., Italy, Japan, Haiti, Nigeria, Cambodia).

3.5.3. 12.9.7. Describe the ideologies that give rise to Communism, methods of maintaining control, and the movements to overthrow such governments in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Poland, including the roles of individuals (e.g., Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Pope John Paul II, Lech Walesa, Vaclav Havel).

4. Skills Attainment and Social Participation

4.1. Participation Skills

4.1.1. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3 Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

4.1.2. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6 Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.

4.1.2.1. H-SS AS: Students identify bias and prejudice in historical interpretations.

4.1.3. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

4.1.4. These standards can be used to incite participation.

4.1.5. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3 Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

4.2. Critical Thinking Skills

4.2.1. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.1.a Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

4.2.1.1. H-SS AS: Students distinguish valid arguments from fallacious arguments in historical interpretations.

4.2.2. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2.a Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehensi

4.2.3. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8 Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

4.3. Basic Study Skills

4.3.1. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

4.3.1.1. H-SS AS: Students construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations.

4.3.2. CSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

4.3.2.1. H-SS AS: Students construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations.

4.3.3. CSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.