CA H-SS Framework, Content Standards, and Common Core Literacy Standards: 12th Grade Government.

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CA H-SS Framework, Content Standards, and Common Core Literacy Standards: 12th Grade Government. by Mind Map: CA H-SS Framework, Content Standards, and Common Core Literacy Standards: 12th Grade Government.

1. Goal of Knowledge and Cultural Understanding

1.1. 12.3.1. Explain how civil society provides opportunities for individuals to associate for social, cultural, religious, economic, and political purposes.

1.1.1. This framework encourages the development of civic and democratic values as an integral element of good citizenship.

1.1.2. This framework emphasizes the importance of the application of ethical understanding and civic virtue to public affairs.

1.2. 12.9.1. Explain how the different philosophies and structures of feudalism, mercantilism, socialism, fascism, communism, monarchies, parliamentary systems, and constitutional liberal democracies influence economic policies, social welfare policies, and human rights practices.

1.3. 12.9.5. Identify the forms of illegitimate power that twentieth-century African, Asian, and Latin American dictators used to gain and hold office and the conditions and interests that supported them

1.3.1. This framework encourages teachers to present controversial issues honestly and accurately within their historical or contemporary context.

1.3.1.1. Latin America

1.3.1.2. immigration

1.3.1.3. Revolutions in Latin America

1.3.1.4. Latin America and Capitalism

2. Goal of Democratic Understanding and Civic Values

2.1. 12.2.1 Discuss the meaning and importance of each of the rights guaranteed under the Bill of Rights and how each is secured (e.g., freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, petition, privacy).

2.1.1. Freedom of Speech

2.1.2. Freedom of Religion

2.1.3. Right to Bear Arms

2.1.4. Right to Privacy

2.1.5. No Cruel and Unusual Punshiment

2.2. 12.1.1 Analyze the influence of ancient Greek, Roman, English, and leading European political thinkers such as John Locke, Charles-Louis Montesquieu, Niccolò Machiavelli, and William Blackstone on the development of American government.

2.3. 12.1.3 Explain how the U.S. Constitution reflects a balance between the classical republican concern with promotion of the public good and the classical liberal concern with protecting individual rights; and discuss how the basic premises of liberal constitutionalism and democracy are joined in the Declaration of Independence as "self-evident truths."

2.3.1. Political Parties and the Executive Branch

2.3.1.1. Libeerals

2.3.1.2. Conservatives

2.3.1.3. Federalists

2.3.1.4. Anti-Federalists

2.4. 12.1.6 6. Understand that the Bill of Rights limits the powers of the federal government and state governments.

2.4.1. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

2.4.1.1. Judicial Branch

2.4.1.1.1. Interpreting the Constitution

3. Goal of Skills Attainment and Social Participation

3.1. Critical Thinking

3.1.1. CCSS.HSS-READING.RL.11-12.2. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

3.1.1.1. This framework is centered in the chronological study of history.

3.1.1.1.1. 12.1.3. Explain how the U.S. Constitution reflects a balance between the classical republican concern with promotion of the public good and the classical liberal concern with protecting individual rights; and discuss how the basic premises of liberal constitutionalism and democracy are joined in the Declaration of Independence as "self-evident truths."

3.1.1.2. This framework emphasizes the importance of history as a story well told.

3.1.1.2.1. Bill of Rights

3.2. Participation Skills- Group and Individual social and political communication skills.

3.2.1. CCSS.HSS-WRITING.WL.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

3.2.1.1. This framework emphasizes the importance of enriching the study enriched with the 4 of history with the use of literature, both literature of the period literature of the period and literature about the period.

3.2.1.1.1. 12.1.11. Analyze the influence of ancient Greek, Roman, English, and leading European political thinkers such as John Locke, Charles-Louis Montesquieu, Niccolò Machiavelli, and William Blackstone on the development of American government

3.2.1.1.2. 12.12. Discuss the character of American democracy and its promise and perils as articulated by Alexis de Tocqueville. .

3.2.2. CCSS.HSS-WRITING.WL.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

3.3. Basic study skills

3.3.1. CCSS.HSS-WRITING.WL.11-12..7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a selfgenerated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

3.3.1.1. This framework supports a variety of content-appropriate teaching methods that engage students actively in the learning process.

4. History and Social Science

4.1. Framework

4.2. Content Standards

4.3. Common Core Literacy Standards