Will we run out of energy?

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Will we run out of energy? by Mind Map: Will we run out of energy?

1. How do we use energy?

1.1. Science 9

1.1.1. Unit D: Electrical Principles and Technologies

1.1.1.1. GLO 4 - Describe and discuss the societal and environmental implications of the use of electrical energy

1.1.1.1.1. SLO 4.1 - Identify and evaluate sources of electrical energy, including oil, gas, coal, biomass, wind and solar

1.2. Science 10

1.2.1. Unit D: Energy Flow in Global Systems

1.2.1.1. GLO 1 - Describe how the relationships among input solar energy, output terrestrial energy and energy flow within the biosphere affect the lives of humans and other species

1.2.1.1.1. SLO 1.1 - Explain how climate affects the lives of people and other species, and explain the need to investigate climate change (e.g., describe the responses of human and other species to extreme climatic conditions; describe housing designs, animal habitats, clothing and fur in conditions of extreme heat, cold, dryness or humidity, wind)

1.2.2. Unit B: Energy Flow Through Technological Systems

1.2.2.1. GLO 3 - Apply the principles of energy conservation and thermodynamics to investigate, describe and predict efficiency of energy transformation in technological systems

1.2.2.1.1. SLO 3.3 - Define, operationally, 'useful' energy from a technological perspective, and analyze the stages of 'useful' energy transformations in technological systems (e.g., hydroelectric dam)

1.2.2.2. GLO 1 - Analyze and illustrate how technologies based on thermodynamic principles were developed before the laws of thermodynamics were formulated

1.2.2.2.1. SLO 1.2 - Describe, qualitatively, current and past technologies used to transform energy from one form to another, and that energy transfer technologies produce measurable changes in motion, shape or temperature

1.3. Biology 20

1.3.1. Unit C: Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

1.3.1.1. GLO 2 - Explain the role of cellular respiration in releasing potential energy from organic compounds.

1.3.1.1.1. SLO 2.2 - Explain, in general terms, how chemiosmosis converts the reducing power of NADH and FADH to store chemical potential energy as ATP; and describe where in the mitochondrion these processes occur

1.3.1.1.2. SLO 2.4 - Summarize and explain the role of ATP in cellular metabolism; e.g., • active transport • cytoplasmic streaming • phagocytosis • biochemical synthesis • muscle contraction • heat production.

1.3.2. Unit D: Human Systems

1.3.2.1. GLO 1 - Explain how the human digestive and respiratory systems exchange energy and matter with the environment.

1.3.2.1.1. SLO 1.5 - Explain the exchange of matter and the transfer of thermal energy between the body and the environment, using the mechanism of breathing in gas exchange, removal of foreign material and heat loss.

1.3.2.2. GLO 4 - Explain the role of the motor system in the function of other body systems

1.3.2.2.1. SLO 4.1 - Explain how the motor system supports body functions (i.e., digestive, circulatory, respiratory, excretory and locomotory), referencing smooth, cardiac and striated muscle

1.3.2.2.2. SLO 4.2 - Describe, in general, the action of actin and myosin in muscle contraction and heat production.

1.3.2.2.3. STS 4.1 - Explain that concepts, models and theories are often used in interpreting and explaining observations and in predicting future observations • analyze the effects of exercise on muscle fibre • describe the relationship between fitness and efficiency of muscle action • assess the physiological effects on the motor system of anabolic steroids and energy enhancing drugs such as creatine phosphate

2. What is energy?

2.1. Art 10

2.1.1. Drawing

2.1.1.1. GLO Investigate - Develop and refine drawing skills and styles

2.1.1.1.1. SLO A - A change in drawing techniques can express a different point of view about the same subject matter

2.1.1.2. GLO Communicate - Investigate varieties of expression in making images

2.1.1.2.1. SLO A - Drawings can express the artist's concern for social conditions

2.2. Drama 10

2.2.1. GLO - Orientation

2.2.1.1. The student will be able to share ideas confidently

2.2.1.2. The students will display consideration and respect for self and others

2.2.1.3. The student will be able to positively support the work of others

2.2.2. The student will recognize that values are expressed through the arts

2.2.3. GLO - Movement

2.2.3.1. The student will be able to demonstrate qualities of energy

2.2.3.2. The student will be able to translate words, images and emotions into movement

2.2.3.3. The student will be able to demonstrate understanding of mood and communicate mood

2.3. Science 10

2.3.1. Unit B: Energy Flow Through Technological Systems

2.3.1.1. GLO 1 - Analyze and illustrate how technologies based on thermodynamic principles were developed before the laws of thermodynamics were formulated

2.3.1.1.1. SLO 1.1 - Illustrate by use of examples from natural and technological systems, that energy exists in variety of forms (e.g., mechanical, chemical, thermal, nuclear, solar)

2.3.1.1.2. SLO 1.2 - Describe, qualitatively, current and past technologies used to transform energy from one form to another, and that energy transfer technologies produce measurable changes in motion, shape or temperature (e.g., hydroelectric and coal-burning generators, solar heating panels, windmills, fuel cells; describe examples of Aboriginal applications of thermodynamics in tool making, design of structures and heating)

2.3.2. Skills

2.3.2.1. Formulate operational definitions of major variables (e.g., define heat of fusion or vaporization as the quantity of energy to change the state of one mole of matter at its melting or boiling point in the absence of temperature change) (Nature of Science)

2.4. Chemistry 20/30

2.4.1. Theme 3: Energy

2.4.1.1. The capacity for doing work that drives much of what takes place in the universe through its variety of interconvertible forms.

3. Where do we get energy?

3.1. Science 9

3.1.1. Unit D: Electrical Principles and Technologies

3.1.1.1. GLO 1 - Investigate and interpret the use of devices to convert various forms of energy to electrical energy, and electrical energy to other forms of energy

3.1.1.1.1. SLO 1.1 - Identify, describe and interpret examples of mechanical, chemical, thermal, electrical and light energy

3.2. Physics 20

3.2.1. Unit C: Circular Motion, Work, and Energy

3.2.1.1. GLO 2 - Explain that work is a transfer of energy and that conservation of energy in an isolated system is a fundamental physical concept.

3.2.1.1.1. SLO 2.1 - Define mechanical energy as the sum of kinetic and potential energy

3.2.1.1.2. SLO 2.2 - Determine, quantitatively, the relationships among the kinetic, gravitational potential and total mechanical energies of a mass at any point between maximum potential energy and maximum kinetic energy

3.2.1.1.3. SLO 2.4 - Recall work as a measure of the mechanical energy transferred and power as the rate of doing work

3.3. Local and Canadian Geography 20

3.3.1. GLO Theme 1 - The change in settlement patterns in the local area

3.3.1.1. SLO a. the neighbourhood and the city

3.3.1.2. SLO c. relationship of the urban industrial resources to the rural primary resources

3.3.2. Skills and Concepts in Geography

3.3.2.1. 1. Map reading and atlas skills

3.3.2.1.1. a. topographical maps

3.3.2.1.2. d. graphs and diagrams

3.3.2.2. 4. World geographic systems

3.3.2.2.1. a. winds

3.3.2.2.2. d. land use

3.3.2.2.3. e. populations distributions

3.3.2.2.4. f. relationships

3.4. Science 10

3.4.1. Unit D: Energy Flow in Global Systems

3.4.1.1. GLO 1 - Describe how the relationships among input solar energy, output terrestrial energy and energy flow within the biosphere affect the lives of humans and other species

3.4.1.1.1. SLO 1.2 - Identify the Sun as the source of all energy on Earth

3.4.2. Unit B: Energy Flow Through Technological Systems

3.4.2.1. GLO 1 - Analyze and illustrate how technologies based on thermodynamic principles were developed before the laws of thermodynamics were formulated

3.4.2.1.1. SLO 1.3 - Identify the processes of trial and error that led to the invention of the engine, and relate the principles of thermodynamics to the development of more efficient engine designs (e.g., the work of James Watt; improved valve designs in car engines)

3.4.2.1.2. SLO 1.4 - Analyza and illustrate how the concept of energy developed from observation of heat and mechanical devices (e.g., the investigations of Rumford and Joule; the development of pre-contact First Nations and Inuit technologies based on an understanding of thermal energy and transfer)

3.5. Chemistry 20/30

3.5.1. Science and Technology Emphasis

3.5.1.1. Concepts

3.5.1.1.1. Technological problems often require multiple solutions that involve different designs, materials and processes and that have both intended and unintended consequences

3.5.1.1.2. The products of technology are devices, systems and processes that meet given needs; however, these products cannot solve all problems (Nature of Science)

3.5.1.1.3. The appropriateness, risks and benefits of technologies need to be assessed for each potential application from a variety of perspectives, including sustainability

3.5.1.2. Skills

3.5.1.2.1. Analyzing and Interpreting • evaluate designs and prototypes on the basis of self-developed criteria; e.g., function, reliability, cost, safety, efficient use of materials, impact on the environment • analyze alternative solutions to a given problem, identify potential strengths and weaknesses of each and recommend an approach to solving the problem, based on findings

3.5.1.2.2. Communication and Teamwork • work collaboratively to test a prototype device or system and troubleshoot problems as they arise • select and use appropriate numeric, symbolic, graphical and linguistic modes of representation to communicate findings and conclusions

3.6. Science 20

3.6.1. Unit A: Chemical Changes

3.6.1.1. GLO 3 - Describe the properties of simple hydrocarbons and describe hydrocarbon-based industrial processes that are important in Alberta.

3.6.1.1.1. STS 3.1 - Develop an understanding that science and technology are developed to meet societal needs and expand human capability: • describe some major reactions of the petrochemical industry in Alberta, such as the production of methanol and polyethene • describe processes, such as catalytic cracking, for obtaining economically important compounds from fossil fuels • explain the traditional uses of oil sands (pitch) as caulking for canoes and the use of animal oils and fats as fuels

3.6.1.1.2. SLO 3.1 - Identify materials used in daily life that are based upon Alberta’s petrochemical industry and that involve changes in energy; e.g., plastics, cosmetics, gasoline

3.6.1.1.3. SLO 3.4 - Identify hydrocarbons as a source of fossil fuels and explain the processes of fractional distillation to refine petroleum and catalytic cracking to produce ethene (ethylene)

4. How do we store energy?

4.1. Biology 20

4.1.1. Unit C: Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

4.1.1.1. GLO 1 - Relate photosynthesis to storage of energy in organic compounds.

4.1.1.1.1. SLO 1.2 - Explain, in general terms, how energy is absorbed by pigments, transferred through the reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) to NADPH, and then transferred as chemical potential energy to ATP by chemiosmosis; and describe where in the chloroplast these processes occur

4.1.2. Unit A: Energy and Matter Change in the Biosphere

4.1.2.1. GLO 1 - Explain the constant flow of energy through the biosphere and ecosystems.

4.1.2.1.1. SLO 1.1 - Explain, in general terms, the one-way flow of energy through the biosphere and how stored energy in the biosphere, as a system, is eventually “lost” as heat; e.g., • photosynthesis/chemosynthesis • cellular respiration (muscle-heat generation, decomposition) • energy transfer by conduction, radiation and convection

4.1.2.1.2. STS 1.1 - Explain that the process of scientific investigation includes analyzing evidence and providing explanations based upon scientific theories and concepts • evaluate the evidence for the influence of ice and snow on the trapping of solar energy (albedo effect) and hypothesize on the consequences of fluctuations for biological systems • explain how metabolic heat release from harvested grain can be reduced by drying processes prior to grain storage and explain the scientific principles involved in this technology • explain, in terms of energy flow, the advantage of vegetarianism in densely populated countries

4.2. Math 10

4.2.1. GLO - Measurement: Develop spatial sense and proportional reasoning

4.2.1.1. SLO 1 - Solve problems that involve linear measurement using - SI and imperial units of measure, estimation strategies, measurement strategies

4.2.1.2. SLO 3 - Solve problems, using SI and imperial units, that involve the surface area and volume of 3D objects, including: right cones, right cylinders, right prisms, right pyramids, spheres

4.2.2. GLO - Relations and Functions: Develop algebraic and graphical reasoning through the study of relations

4.2.2.1. SLO 5 - Determine the characteristics of the graphs of linear relations, including the: intercepts, slope, domain, range.

4.3. Science 10

4.3.1. Unit B: Energy Flow in Technological Systems

4.3.1.1. GLO 3 - Apply the principles of energy conservation and thermodynamics to investigate, describe and predict efficiency of energy transformation in technological systems

4.3.1.1.1. SLO 3.1 - Describe, qualitatively in terms of thermodynamic laws, the laws, the energy transformations occur in devices and systems (e.g.. automobile, bicycle coming to a stop, thermal power plant, food chain, refrigerators, heat pump, permafrost storage pits for food)

5. How much energy do we use?

5.1. Science 9

5.1.1. Unit D: Electrical Principles and Technologies

5.1.1.1. GLO 3 - Identify and estimate energy inputs and outputs for example devices and systems, and evaluate the efficiency of energy conversions

5.1.1.1.1. SLO 3.1 - Identify the forms of energy inputs and outputs in a device or system

5.1.1.1.2. SLO 3.2 - Apply appropriate units, measures and devices in determining and describing quantities of energy transformed by an electrical device, by: − measuring amperage and voltage, and calculating the number of watts consumed by an electrical device, using the formula P = IV [power (in watts) = current (in amps) × voltage (in volts)] − calculating the quantity of electric energy, in joules, transformed by an electrical device, using the formula E = P × t [energy (in joules) = power (in watts) × time (in seconds)]

5.1.1.1.3. SLO 3.4 - Compare energy inputs and outputs of a device, and calculate its efficiency, using the formula, percent efficiency = energy output/energy input × 100

5.2. Physics 20

5.2.1. Unit C: Circular Motion, Work, and Energy

5.2.1.1. GLO 2 - Explain that work is a transfer of energy and that conservation of energy in an isolated system is a fundamental physical concept.

5.2.1.1.1. Analyzing and Interpreting 2.1 - Analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess possible solutions • use free-body diagrams to organize and communicate solutions to work-energy theorem problems • solve, quantitatively, kinematics and dynamics problems, using the work-energy theorem • analyze data to determine effective energy conservation strategies; e.g., analyze whether lowering the speed limit or modifying the internal combustion engine saves more energy in vehicles

5.3. Math 10

5.3.1. GLO - Measurement: Develop spatial sense and proportional reasoning

5.3.1.1. SLO 1 - Solve problems that involve linear measurement using - SI and imperial units of measure, estimation strategies, measurement strategies

5.3.1.2. SLO 3 - Solve problems, using SI and imperial units, that involve the surface area and volume of 3D objects, including: right cones, right cylinders, right prisms, right pyramids, spheres

5.3.2. GLO - Relations and Functions: Develop algebraic and graphical reasoning through the study of relations

5.3.2.1. SLO 5 - Determine the characteristics of the graphs of linear relations, including the: intercepts, slope, domain, range.

5.4. Science 10

5.4.1. Unit B: Energy Flow In Technological Systems

5.4.1.1. GLO 3 - Apply the principles of energy conservation and thermodynamics to investigate, describe and predict efficiency of energy transformation in technological systems

5.4.1.1.1. SLO 3.3 - Define, operationally, 'useful' energy from a technological perspective, and analyze the stages of 'useful' energy transformations in technological systems (e.g., hydroelectric dam)

6. What are the repercussions of harnessing energy?

6.1. Aboriginal 30

6.1.1. Theme IV: Aboriginal World Issues

6.1.1.1. GLO 1 - Demonstrate an understanding that indigenous peoples around the world face common issues in their history, geography, politics, economics, education and culture

6.1.1.1.1. SLO 1.4 - Demonstrate an understanding that one of the reasons for current conflict between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples lies in how the care and management of natural resources are practised:

6.2. Science 20

6.2.1. Unit A: Energy and Matter Exchange of the Biosphere

6.2.1.1. GLO 3 - Explain the balance of energy and matter exchange in the biosphere, as an open system, and explain how this maintains equilibrium.

6.2.1.1.1. STS 3.2 - Explain that science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences for humans and the environment • describe how human activities can have a disrupting influence on the balance in the biosphere of photosynthetic and cellular respiratory activities: − fossil fuel combustion − depletion of stratospheric ozone − forest destruction.

6.3. Social 10

6.3.1. GLO 3 - Assess economic, environmental and other contemporary impacts of globalization

6.3.1.1. SLO 3.7 - Evaluate multiple perspectives regarding the relationship among people, the land and globalization

6.3.1.2. SLO 3.8 - Evaluate actions and policies associated with globalization that impact the environment

6.3.1.3. SLO 3.9 - Analyze multiple perspectives on sustainability and prosperity in a globalizing world

6.3.2. GLO 4 - Assess their roles and responsibilities in a globalizing world

6.3.2.1. SLO 4.1 - Recognize and appreciate the impact of globalization on the quality of life of individuals and communities

6.3.2.2. SLO 4.4 - Explore various understandings of quality of life

6.3.2.3. SLO 4.6 - Analyze impacts of globalization on children and youth ( awareness of global issues, employment issues, identity)

6.3.2.4. SLO 4.8 - Analyze how globalization affects individuals and communities (migration, technology, agricultural issues, pandemics, resource issues, contemporary issues)

6.3.2.5. SLO 4.9 - Explore multiple perspectives regarding the civic responsibilities that individuals, governments, organizations and businesses may have in addressing opportunities and challenges presented by globalization

6.3.2.6. SLO 4.11 - Develop strategies to demonstrate active, responsible global citizenship

6.4. Social 10-2

6.4.1. GLO 3 - Understand economic, environmental and other impacts of globalization

6.4.1.1. SLO 3.1 - Recognize and appreciate multiple perspectives that exist with respect to the relationships among economics, politics, the environment and globalization

6.4.1.2. SLO 3.7 - Explore multiple perspectives on relationships among people, the land and globalization (spirituality, stewardship, sustainability, resource development)

6.4.1.3. SLO 3.8 - Analyze the impact of actions and policies associated with globalization on the environment (land and resource development agreements, environmental legislation)

6.4.1.4. SLO 3.9 - Examine multiple perspectives on sustainability and prosperity in a globalizing world

6.4.2. GLO 4 - Examine their roles and responsibilities in a globalizing world

6.4.2.1. SLO 4.1 - Recognize and appreciate the impact of globalization on the quality of life of individuals and communities

6.4.2.2. SLO 4.5 - Examine impacts of globalization on children and youth (awareness of global issues, employment issues, identity)

6.4.2.3. SLO 4.8 - Examine how globalization affects individuals and communities (migration, technology, agricultural issues, pandemics, resource issues, contemporary issues)

6.5. Art 10

6.5.1. Drawing

6.5.1.1. GLO Investigate - Develop and refine drawing skills and styles

6.5.1.1.1. SLO A - A change in drawing techniques can express a different point of view about the same subject matter

6.5.1.2. GLO Communicate - Investigate varieties of expression in making images

6.5.1.2.1. SLO A - Drawings can express the artist's concern for social conditions

6.6. Biology 20

6.6.1. Unit A: Energy and Matter Exchange in the Biosphere

6.6.1.1. GLO 2 - Explain the cycling of matter through the biosphere.

6.6.1.1.1. STS 2.1 - Explain that science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences for humans and the environment • discuss the influence of human activities on the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus, sulfur, iron and nitrogen: − feedlot operations − composting − fertilizer applications − waste and sewage disposal − vehicle and refinery emissions − acid deposition − persistent organic pollutants

6.6.1.2. GLO 3 - Explain the balance of energy and matter exchange in the biosphere, as an open system, and explain how this maintains equilibrium.

6.6.1.2.1. STS 3.2 - Explain that science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences for humans and the environment • describe how human activities can have a disrupting influence on the balance in the biosphere of photosynthetic and cellular respiratory activities: − fossil fuel combustion − depletion of stratospheric ozone − forest destruction.

6.6.2. Unit C: Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

6.6.2.1. GLO 2 - Explain the role of cellular respiration in releasing potential energy from organic compounds.

6.6.2.1.1. STS 2.2 - Explain that science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences for humans and the environment • discuss how pollutants such as hydrogen sulfide and cyanide are by-products of industrial processes and explain the specific metabolic effects of these pollutants on aerobic organisms.

6.7. Science 10

6.7.1. Unit D; Energy Flow in Global Systems

6.7.1.1. GLO 4 - Investigate and interpret the role of environmental factors on global energy transfer and climate change

6.7.1.1.1. SLO 4.6 - Assess, from a variety of perspectives, the risks and benefits of human activity, and its impact on the biosphere and the climate (e.g., compare the Gaia hypothesis with traditional Aboriginal perspectives on the natural world; identify and analyze various perspectives on reducing the impact of human activity on the global climate)

6.7.1.1.2. SLO 4.1 - Investigate and identify human actions affecting biomes that have a potential to change climate (e.g., emission of greenhouse gases, draining of wetlands, forest fires, deforestation) and critically examine the evidence that these factors play a role in climate change (e.g., global warming, rising sea level(s))

6.7.1.2. GLO 3 - Relate climate to the characteristics of the world’s major biomes, and compare biomes in different regions of the world

6.7.1.2.1. SLO 3.4 - Identify the potential effects of climate change on environmentally sensitive biomes (e.g., impact of a reduction in the Arctic ice pack on local species and on Aboriginal societies that rely on traditional lifestyles)

6.7.2. Skills

6.7.2.1. Select and integrate information from various print and electronic sources or from several parts of the same source (e.g., collect weather and climate data, both historic and current, from the Internet)

6.7.2.2. Identify and apply criteria for evaluating evidence and sources of information, including identifying bias (e.g., investigate the issue of global climate change)

6.7.2.3. State a conclusion based on experimental data, and explain how evidence gathered supports or refutes the initial hypothesis (e.g., summarize an analysis of the relationship between human activity and changing biomes)

6.7.2.4. Explain how data support or refute a hypothesis or a prediction (e.g., provide evidence for or against the hypothesis that human activity is responsible for climate change) (Nature of Science)

6.7.2.5. Synthesize information from multiple sources or from complex and lengthy texts, and make inferences based on this information (e.g., use integrated software effectively and efficiently to produce work that incorporates data, graphics and text)

6.7.2.6. identify multiple perspectives that influence a science-related decision or issue (e.g., consult a wide variety of electronic sources that reflect varied viewpoints and economic, social, scientific and other perspectives on global warming and climate change)

6.7.3. Attitudes

6.7.3.1. Show interest in science-related questions and issues, and confidently pursue personal interests and career possibilities within science-related fields (e.g., expand their inquiries beyond the classroom and into their everyday lives; show interest in careers related to climate and the environment)

6.8. Chemistry 20/30

6.8.1. Social and Environmental Contexts Emphasis

6.8.1.1. Concepts

6.8.1.1.1. Science and technology are developed to meet societal needs and expand human capability

6.8.1.1.2. Science and technology have influenced, and been influenced by, historical development and societal needs

6.8.1.1.3. Science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences for humans and the environment

6.9. CALM

6.9.1. GLO 2 - Resource Choices: Make responsible decisions in the use of finances and other resources that reflect personal values and goals and remonstrate commitment to self and others`

6.9.1.1. SLO R6 - Develop strategies to be informed consumers

6.9.1.1.1. 1. Explain the power and importance of sustainable development

6.9.1.1.2. 2. Describe the influences on personal consumer choices

6.9.1.1.3. 3. Explain the rights and responsibilities of a consumer

6.9.1.1.4. 4. Analyze the impact of personal values, wants and needs on being an informed and responsible consumer

7. Should we use all kinds of energy?

7.1. Social 10

7.1.1. GLO 3 - Students will assess economic, environmental and other contemporary impacts of globalization

7.1.1.1. SLO 3.7 - Evaluate multiple perspectives regarding the relationship among people, the land and globalization

7.1.1.2. SLO 3.8 - Evaluate actions and policies associated with globalization that impact the environment

7.1.1.3. SLO 3.9 - Analyze multiple perspectives on sustainability and prosperity in a globalizing world

7.1.2. GLO 4 - Students will assess their roles and responsibilities in a globalizing world

7.1.2.1. SLO 4.1 - Recognize and appreciate the impact of globalization on the quality of life of individuals and communities

7.1.2.2. SLO 4.4 - Explore various understandings of quality of life

7.1.2.3. SLO 4.6 - Analyze impacts of globalization on children and youth ( awareness of global issues, employment issues, identity)

7.1.2.4. SLO 4.8 - Analyze how globalization affects individuals and communities (migration, technology, agricultural issues, pandemics, resource issues, contemporary issues)

7.1.2.5. SLO 4.9 - Explore multiple perspectives regarding the civic responsibilities that individuals, governments, organizations and businesses may have in addressing opportunities and challenges presented by globalization

7.1.2.6. SLO 4.11 - Develop strategies to demonstrate active, responsible global citizenship

7.2. Social 10-2

7.2.1. GLO 3 - Students will understand economic, environmental and other impacts of globalization

7.2.1.1. SLO 3.1 - Recognize and appreciate multiple perspectives that exist with respect to the relationships among economics, politics, the environment and globalization

7.2.1.2. SLO 3.7 - Explore multiple perspectives on relationships among people, the land and globalization (spirituality, stewardship, sustainability, resource development)

7.2.1.3. SLO 3.8 - Analyze the impact of actions and policies associated with globalization on the environment (land and resource development agreements, environmental legislation)

7.2.1.4. SLO 3.9 - Examine multiple perspectives on sustainability and prosperity in a globalizing world

7.2.2. GLO 4 - Students will examine their roles and responsibilities in a globalizing world

7.2.2.1. SLO 4.1 - Recognize and appreciate the impact of globalization on the quality of life of individuals and communities

7.2.2.2. SLO 4.5 - Examine impacts of globalization on children and youth (awareness of global issues, employment issues, identity)

7.2.2.3. SLO 4.8 - Examine how globalization affects individuals and communities (migration, technology, agricultural issues, pandemics, resource issues, contemporary issues)

7.3. Science 10

7.3.1. Unit D; Energy Flow in Global Systems

7.3.1.1. GLO 1 - Describe how the relationships among input solar energy, output terrestrial energy and energy flow within the biosphere affect the lives of humans and other species

7.3.1.1.1. SLO 1.3 - Analyze, in general terms, the net radiation budget, using per cent; i.e., solar energy input, terrestrial energy output, net radiant energy

7.3.1.1.2. SLO 1.5 - Describe and explain the greenhouse effect, and the role of various gases—including methane, carbon dioxide and water vapour—in determining the scope of the greenhouse effect

7.3.1.2. GLO 3 - Relate climate to the characteristics of the world’s major biomes, and compare biomes in different regions of the world

7.3.1.2.1. SLO 3.4 - Identify the potential effects of climate change on environmentally sensitive biomes (e.g., impact of a reduction in the Arctic ice pack on local species and on Aboriginal societies that rely on traditional lifestyles)

7.3.1.3. GLO 4 - Investigate and interpret the role of environmental factors on global energy transfer and climate change

7.3.1.3.1. SLO 4.2 - Identify evidence to investigate past changes in Earth’s climate (e.g., ice core samples, tree ring analysis)

7.3.1.3.2. SLO 4.1 - Investigate and identify human actions affecting biomes that have a potential to change climate (e.g., emission of greenhouse gases, draining of wetlands, forest fires, deforestation) and critically examine the evidence that these factors play a role in climate change (e.g., global warming, rising sea level(s))

7.3.1.3.3. SLO 4.6 - Assess, from a variety of perspectives, the risks and benefits of human activity, and its impact on the biosphere and the climate (e.g., compare the Gaia hypothesis with traditional Aboriginal perspectives on the natural world; identify and analyze various perspectives on reducing the impact of human activity on the global climate)

7.3.2. Skills

7.3.2.1. Use library and electronic research tools to collect information on a given topic (e.g., research sources of greenhouse gases; research protocols to control human sources of greenhouse gases)

7.3.2.2. Identify and apply criteria for evaluating evidence and sources of information, including identifying bias (e.g., investigate the issue of global climate change)

7.3.2.3. Identify multiple perspectives that influence a science-related decision or issue (e.g., consult a wide variety of electronic sources that reflect varied viewpoints and economic, social, scientific and other perspectives on global warming and climate change)

7.3.2.4. Propose alternative solutions to a given practical problem, identify the potential strengths and weaknesses of each, and select one as the basis for a plan (e.g., design a home for a specific climate; analyze traditional Aboriginal home designs for their suitability in particular climates)

7.3.2.5. Develop, present and defend a position or course of action, based on findings (e.g., a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions caused by the transportation of people and goods)

7.3.3. Attitudes

7.3.3.1. Appreciate that scientific understanding evolves from the interaction of ideas involving people with different views and backgrounds (e.g., appreciate Aboriginal clothing and home designs of the past and present that use locally-available materials to adapt to climate; recognize that science and technology develop in response to global concerns, as well as to local needs; consider more than one factor or perspective when making decisions on Science, Technology and Society [STS] issues)

7.4. Art 10

7.4.1. Drawing

7.4.1.1. GLO Investigate - Students will develop and refine drawing skills and styles

7.4.1.1.1. SLO A - A change in drawing techniques can express a different point of view about the same subject matter

7.4.1.2. GLO Communicate - Investigate varieties of expression in making images

7.4.1.2.1. SLO A - Drawings can express the artist's concern for social conditions

8. Why do we use certain types of energy?

8.1. Local and Canadian Geography 20

8.1.1. GLO Theme 1- The change in settlement patterns in the local area

8.1.1.1. SLO a. the neighbourhood and the city

8.1.1.2. SLO c. relationship of the urban industrial resources to the rural primary resources

8.1.2. Skills and Concepts in Geography

8.1.2.1. 1. Map reading and atlas skills

8.1.2.1.1. a. topographical maps

8.1.2.1.2. d. graphs and diagrams

8.1.2.2. 4. World geographic systems

8.1.2.2.1. a. winds

8.1.2.2.2. d. land use

8.1.2.2.3. e. populations distributions

8.1.2.2.4. f. relationships

8.2. Science 10

8.2.1. Unit B: Energy Flow Through Technological Systems

8.2.1.1. GLO 3 - Apply the principles of energy conservation and thermodynamics to investigate, describe and predict efficiency of energy transformation in technological systems

8.2.1.1.1. SLO 3.3 - Define, operationally, 'useful' energy from a technological perspective, and analyze the stages of 'useful' energy transformations in technological systems (e.g., hydroelectric dam)

8.2.1.2. GLO 1 - Analyze and illustrate how technologies based on thermodynamic principles were developed before the laws of thermodynamics were formulated

8.2.1.2.1. SLO 1.1 - Illustrate by use of examples from natural and technological systems, that energy exists in variety of forms (e.g., mechanical, chemical, thermal, nuclear, solar)

8.2.1.2.2. SLO 1.2 - Describe, qualitatively, current and past technologies used to transform energy from one form to another, and that energy transfer technologies produce measurable changes in motion, shape or temperature (e.g., hydroelectric and coal-burning generators, solar heating panels, windmills, fuel cells; describe examples of Aboriginal applications of thermodynamics in tool making, design of structures and heating)

8.2.2. Skills

8.2.2.1. Use library and electronic research tools to collect information on a given topic (e.g., research sources of greenhouse gases; research protocols to control human sources of greenhouse gases)

8.2.2.2. Identify multiple perspectives that influence a science-related decision or issue (e.g., consult a wide variety of electronic sources that reflect varied viewpoints and economic, social, scientific and other perspectives on global warming and climate change)

8.2.3. Attitudes

8.2.3.1. Students will demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility in pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and a sustainable environment (e.g., recognize that human actions today may affect the sustainability of biomes for future generations; identify, without bias, potential conflicts between responding to human wants and needs and protecting the environment)

9. Locally, how do we get energy?

9.1. Local and Canadian Geography 20

9.1.1. GLO Theme 1 - The change in settlement patterns in the local area

9.1.1.1. SLO a. the neighbourhood and the city

9.1.1.2. SLO c. relationship of the urban industrial resources to the rural primary resources

9.1.2. Skills and Concepts in Geography

9.1.2.1. 1. Map reading and atlas skills

9.1.2.1.1. a. topographical maps

9.1.2.1.2. d. graphs and diagrams

9.1.2.2. 4. World geographic systems

9.1.2.2.1. a. winds

9.1.2.2.2. d. land use

9.1.2.2.3. e. populations distributions

9.1.2.2.4. f. relationships

9.2. Math 10

9.2.1. GLO - Measurement: Develop spatial sense and proportional reasoning

9.2.1.1. SLO 1 - Solve problems that involve linear measurement using - SI and imperial units of measure, estimation strategies, measurement strategies

9.2.1.2. SLO 3 - Solve problems, using SI and imperial units, that involve the surface area and volume of 3D objects, including: right cones, right cylinders, right prisms, right pyramids, spheres

9.2.2. GLO - Relations and Functions: Develop algebraic and graphical reasoning through the study of relations

9.2.2.1. SLO 5 - Determine the characteristics of the graphs of linear relations, including the: intercepts, slope, domain, range.

9.3. Science 10

9.3.1. Unit D: Energy Flow in Global Systems

9.3.1.1. GLO 3 - Relate climate to the characteristics of the world’s major biomes, and compare biomes in different regions of the world

9.3.1.1.1. SLO 3.1 - Describe a biome as an open system in terms of input and output of energy and matter and exchanges at its boundaries (e.g., compare and contrast cells and biomes as open systems)

9.3.1.1.2. SLO 3.3 - Relate the characteristics of two major biomes (i.e., grassland, desert, tundra, taiga, deciduous and rain forest) to net radiant energy, climatic factors (temperature, moisture, sunlight and wind) and topography (mountain ranges, large bodies of water)

10. How can we conserve energy?

10.1. Science 10

10.1.1. Unit D: Energy Flow in Global Systems

10.1.1.1. GLO 1 - Describe how the relationships among input solar energy, output terrestrial energy and energy flow within the biosphere affect the lives of humans and other species

10.1.1.1.1. SLO 1.1 - Explain how climate affects the lives of people and other species, and explain the need to investigate climate change

10.1.2. Skills

10.1.2.1. Work as members of a team in addressing problems, and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

10.2. Science 9

10.2.1. Unit D: Electrical Principles and Technologies

10.2.1.1. GLO 3 - Identify and estimate energy inputs and outputs for example devices and systems, and evaluate the efficiency of energy conversions

10.2.1.1.1. SLO 3.3 - The concepts of conservation of energy and efficiency to the analysis of energy devices (e.g., identify examples of energy dissipation in the form of heat, and describe the effect of these losses on useful energy output)

10.2.1.2. GLO 4 - Describe and discuss the societal and environmental implications of the use of electrical energy

10.2.1.2.1. SLO 4.4 - Identify concerns regarding conservation of energy resources, and evaluate means for improving the sustainability of energy use

10.3. Social 10

10.3.1. GLO 3 - Assess economic, environmental and other contemporary impacts of globalization

10.3.1.1. SLO 3.7 - Evaluate multiple perspectives regarding the relationship among people, the land and globalization

10.3.1.2. SLO 3.8 - Evaluate actions and policies associated with globalization that impact the environment

10.3.1.3. SLO 3.9 - Analyze multiple perspectives on sustainability and prosperity in a globalizing world

10.3.2. GLO 4 - Assess their roles and responsibilities in a globalizing world

10.3.2.1. SLO 4.1 - Recognize and appreciate the impact of globalization on the quality of life of individuals and communities

10.3.2.2. SLO 4.6 - Analyze impacts of globalization on children and youth ( awareness of global issues, employment issues, identity)

10.4. Social 10-2

10.4.1. GLO 3 - Understand economic, environmental and other impacts of globalization

10.4.1.1. SLO 3.1 - Recognize and appreciate multiple perspectives that exist with respect to the relationships among economics, politics, the environment and globalization

10.4.1.2. SLO 3.7 - Explore multiple perspectives on relationships among people, the land and globalization (spirituality, stewardship, sustainability, resource development)

10.4.1.3. SLO 3.8 - Analyze the impact of actions and policies associated with globalization on the environment (land and resource development agreements, environmental legislation)

10.4.1.4. SLO 3.9 - Examine multiple perspectives on sustainability and prosperity in a globalizing world

10.4.2. GLO 4 - Examine their roles and responsibilities in a globalizing world

10.4.2.1. SLO 4.1 - Recognize and appreciate the impact of globalization on the quality of life of individuals and communities

10.4.2.2. SLO 4.5 - Examine impacts of globalization on children and youth (awareness of global issues, employment issues, identity)

10.5. Physics 20

10.5.1. Unit C: Circular Motion, Work and Energy

10.5.1.1. GLO 2 - Explain that work is a transfer of energy and that conservation of energy in an isolated system is a fundamental physical concept.

10.5.1.1.1. SLO 2.3 - Analyze, quantitatively, kinematics and dynamics problems that relate to the conservation of mechanical energy in an isolated system