Why do we live? / Why do we die?

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Why do we live? / Why do we die? by Mind Map: Why do we live? / Why do we die?

1. How long do our cells live?

1.1. SCI 10 Unit C: Cycling of Matter in Living Systems

1.1.1. GLO 2: Describe the function of cell organelles and structures in a cell, in terms of life processes, and use models to explain these processes and their applications

1.1.1.1. SLO 2.3: Describe the cell as a functioning open system that acquires nutrients, excretes waste, and exchanges matter and energy

1.1.1.2. SLO 2.4: Identify the structure and describe, in general terms, the function of the cell membrane, nucleus, lysosome, vacuole, mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, ribosomes, chloroplast and cell wall, where present, of plant and animal cells

1.1.2. Attitude - Scientific Inquiry: Seek and apply evidence when evaluating alternative approaches to investigations, problems and issues

1.1.3. Development of Microscopes and Cell Theory (STS and Nature of Science)

1.1.4. Skill - Initiating and Planning: Ask questions about observed relationships, and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues

1.1.4.1. Define and delimit problems to facilitate investigation

1.1.4.2. State a prediction and a hypothesis based on available evidence and background information

1.1.4.3. Identify the theoretical basis of an investigation, and develop a prediction and a hypothesis that are consistent with the theoretical basis

1.2. Previous Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes

1.2.1. SCI 7 Unit B: Plants for Food and Fibre

1.2.1.1. GLO 1: Investigate plant uses; and identify links among needs, technologies, products and impacts

1.2.1.2. GLO 2: Investigate life processes and structures of plants, and interpret related characteristics and needs of plants in a local environment

1.2.1.3. GLO 3: Analyze plant environments, and identify impacts of specific factors and controls

1.2.1.4. GLO 4: Identify and interpret relationships among human needs, technologies, environments, and the culture and use of living things as sources of food and fibre

1.3. Other Connections

1.3.1. Nature of Science

1.3.1.1. Explore our environment, gather knowledge and develop ideas that help us interpret and explain what we see.

1.3.1.2. Science-based ideas are continually being tested, modified and improved as new knowledge and explanations supersede existing knowledge and explanations.

1.4. Indigenous Ways of Knowing

1.4.1. Acknowledge the contributions of Aboriginal peoples to understandings of the natural world

1.4.2. Support relational thinking by integrating learning from various disciplines of science

1.4.3. Develop the concept of our connectivity to the natural world and the importance of caring for the environment

1.4.4. Foster the development of positive attitudes by providing experiences that encourage all students to feel confident about their ability to succeed in science

2. How can we prolong cell life?

2.1. SCI 10 Unit C: Cycling of Matter in Living Systems

2.1.1. GLO 1: Explain the relationship between developments in imaging technology and the current understanding of the cell

2.1.1.1. SLO 1.3: Identify areas of cell research at the molecular level

2.1.2. GLO 2: Describe the function of cell organelles and structures in a cell, in terms of life processes, and use models to explain these processes and their applications

2.1.2.1. SLO 2.4: Identify the structure and describe, in general terms, the function of the cell membrane, nucleus, lysosome, vacuole, mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, ribosomes, chloroplast and cell wall, where present, of plant and animal cells

2.1.3. Skill - Communication and Teamwork: Work as members of a team in addressing problems, and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

2.1.3.1. Communicate questions, ideas and intentions; and receive, interpret, understand, support and respond to the ideas of others

2.1.3.2. Select and use appropriate numeric, symbolic, graphical and linguistic modes of representation to communicate ideas, plans and results

2.1.4. Attitude - Mutual Respect: Appreciate that scientific understanding evolves from the interaction of ideas involving people with different views and backgrounds

2.1.5. Attitude - Stewardship: Demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility in pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and a sustainable environment

2.1.6. Attitude - Collaboration: Work collaboratively in planning and carrying out investigations, as well as in generating and evaluating ideas

2.2. Previous Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes

2.2.1. SCI 8 Unit B: Cells and Systems

2.2.1.1. GLO 1: Investigate living things; and identify and apply scientific ideas used to interpret their general structure, function and organization

2.2.1.2. GLO 2: Investigate and describe the role of cells within living things

2.2.1.3. GLO 3: Interpret the healthy function of human body systems, and illustrate ways the body reacts to internal and external stimuli

2.2.1.4. GLO 4: Describe areas of scientific investigation leading to new knowledge about body systems and to new medical applications

2.3. Other Connections

2.3.1. ELA 10 - Outcome 3: Listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to manage ideas and information.

2.3.1.1. SLO 3.1: Determine inquiry or research requirements

2.3.1.1.1. 3.1.2 Plan inquiry or research, and identify information needs and sources

2.3.1.2. SLO 3.2: Follow a plan of inquiry

2.3.1.2.1. 3.2.1 Select, record and organize information

2.3.1.2.2. 3.2.2 Evaluate sources, and assess information

2.3.1.2.3. 3.2.3 Form generalizations and conclusions

2.3.1.2.4. 3.2.4 Review inquiry or research process and findings

2.3.2. Beyond the Classroom

2.3.2.1. Henrietta Lacks (Nature of Science)

3. Why do we age?

3.1. SCI 10 Unit C: Cycling of Mater in Living Systems

3.1.1. GLO 1: Explain the relationship between developments in imaging technology and the current understanding of the cell

3.1.1.1. SLO 1.1: Trace the development of the cell theory: all living things are made up of one or more cells and the materials produced by these, cells are functional units of life, and all cells come from pre-existing cells

3.1.1.2. SLO 1.3: Identify areas of cell research at the molecular level

3.1.2. GLO 2: Describe the function of cell organelles and structures in a cell, in terms of life processes, and use models to explain these processes and their applications

3.1.2.1. SLO 2.3: Describe the cell as a functioning open system that acquires nutrients, excretes waste, and exchanges matter and energy

3.1.3. Attitude - Interest in Science: Show interest in science-related questions and issues, and confidently pursue personal interests and career possibilities within science-related fields

3.1.4. Skill - Initiating and Planning: Ask questions about observed relationships, and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues

3.1.4.1. Define and delimit problems to facilitate investigation

3.1.4.2. Design an experiment, identifying and controlling major variables

3.1.4.3. State a prediction and a hypothesis based on available evidence and background information

3.1.4.4. Identify the theoretical basis of an investigation, and develop a prediction and a hypothesis that are consistent with the theoretical basis

3.1.4.5. Formulate operational definitions of major variables

3.1.5. Attitude - Scientific Inquiry: Seek and apply evidence when evaluating alternative approaches to investigations, problems and issues

3.2. Previous Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes

3.2.1. SCI 8 Unit B: Cells and Systems

3.2.1.1. GLO 1: Investigate living things; and identify and apply scientific ideas used to interpret their general structure, function and organization

3.2.1.2. GLO 2: Investigate and describe the role of cells within living things

3.2.1.3. GLO 3: Interpret the healthy function of human body systems, and illustrate ways the body reacts to internal and external stimuli

3.2.1.4. GLO 4: Describe areas of scientific investigation leading to new knowledge about body systems and to new medical applications

3.3. Other Connections

3.3.1. ELA 10 - Outcome 3: Listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to manage ideas and information.

3.3.1.1. SLO 3.1: Determine inquiry or research requirements

3.3.1.1.1. 3.1.2 Plan inquiry or research, and identify information needs and sources

3.3.1.2. SLO 3.2: Follow a plan of inquiry

3.3.1.2.1. 3.2.1 Select, record and organize information

3.3.1.2.2. 3.2.2 Evaluate sources, and assess information

3.3.1.2.3. 3.2.3 Form generalizations and conclusions

3.3.1.2.4. 3.2.4 Review inquiry or research process and findings

3.3.2. Beyond the Classroom

3.3.2.1. Stem Cell Research (Nature of Science)

3.3.3. Science and Technology

3.3.3.1. Historically, the development of technology has been strongly linked to the development of science, with each making contributions to the other.

3.3.3.2. Technology focuses on the development of solutions, involving devices and systems that meet a given need within the constraints of the problem.

4. What does a cell need to survive? What can it live without?

4.1. SCI 10 Unit C: Cycling of Matter in Living Systems

4.1.1. GLO 2: Describe the function of cell organelles and structures in a cell, in terms of life processes, and use models to explain these processes and their applications

4.1.1.1. SLO 2.1: Compare passive transport of matter by diffusion and osmosis with active transport in terms of the particle model of matter, concentration gradients, equilibrium and protein carrier molecules

4.1.1.2. SLO 2.2: Use models to explain and visualize complex processes like diffusion and osmosis, endo- and exocytosis, and the role of cell membrane in these processes

4.1.1.3. SLO 2.4: Identify the structure and describe, in general terms, the function of the cell membrane, nucleus, lysosome, vacuole, mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, ribosomes, chloroplast and cell wall, where present, of plant and animal cells

4.1.2. Skill - Analyzing and Interpreting: Analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess possible solutions

4.1.2.1. Compile and display, by hand or computer, evidence and information in a variety of formats, including diagrams, flow charts, tables, graphs and scatterplots

4.1.2.2. Interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer or calculate linear and nonlinear relationships among variables

4.1.2.3. State a conclusion based on experimental data, and explain how evidence gathered supports or refutes the initial hypothesis

4.1.2.4. Explain how data support or refute a hypothesis or prediction

4.1.2.5. Construct and test a prototype of a device or system, and troubleshoot problems as they arise

4.1.2.6. Identify new questions or problems that arise from what was learned

4.1.3. Attitude - Interest in Science: Show interest in science-related questions and issues, and confidently pursue personal interests and career possibilities within science-related fields

4.2. Previous Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes

4.2.1. Grade 8 Mathematics

4.2.1.1. Rate, Ratio, and Proportion

4.2.1.1.1. Specific Outcomes 4 & 5

4.2.2. Grade 9 Mathematics

4.2.2.1. Data Analysis and Collection

4.2.2.1.1. Specific Outcome 3: Statistics and Probability

4.2.2.2. Graph Analysis

4.2.2.2.1. Specific Outcome 2: Patterns and Relations

4.2.2.3. Scale Diagrams

4.2.2.3.1. Specific Outcome 4: Shape and Space

4.3. Other Connections

4.3.1. Grade 10 Mathematics

4.3.1.1. Measurement and Unit Conversions

4.3.1.1.1. Specific Outcomes 1, 2, 3 (Measurement)

4.3.1.2. Graph Analysis

4.3.1.2.1. Specific Outcomes 1 and 4 (Relations and Functions)

4.3.2. Grade 10-3 Mathematics

4.3.2.1. Measurement and Unit Conversions

4.3.2.1.1. Specific Outcome 1: Measurement

5. Can we regrow cells and tissues? How?

5.1. SCI 10 Unit C: Cycling of Matter in Living Systems

5.1.1. GLO 1: Explain the relationship between developments in imaging technology and the current understanding of the cell

5.1.1.1. SLO 1.1: Trace the development of the cell theory: all living things are made up of one or more cells and the materials produced by these, cells are functional units of life, and all cells come from pre-existing cells

5.1.1.2. SLO 1.2: Describe how advancements in knowledge of cell structure and function have been enhanced and are increasing as a direct result of developments in microscope technology and staining techniques

5.1.1.3. SLO 1.3: Identify areas of cell research at the molecular level

5.1.2. GLO 2: Describe the function of cell organelles and structures in a cell, in terms of life processes, and use models to explain these processes and their applications

5.1.2.1. SLO 2.1: Compare passive transport of matter by diffusion and osmosis with active transport in terms of the particle model of matter, concentration gradients, equilibrium and protein carrier molecules

5.1.2.2. SLO 2.2: Use models to explain and visualize complex processes like diffusion and osmosis, endo- and exocytosis, and the role of cell membrane in these processes

5.1.3. GLO 3: Analyze plants as an example of a multicellular organism with specialized structures at the cellular, tissue and system levels

5.1.3.1. SLO 3.5: Explain and investigate phototropism and gravitropism as examples of control systems in plants

5.1.3.2. SLO 3.6: Trace the development of theories of phototropism and gravitropism

5.2. Attitude - Stewardship: Demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility in pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and a sustainable environment

5.3. Previous Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes

5.3.1. SCI 8 Unit B: Cells and Systems

5.3.1.1. GLO 1: Investigate living things; and identify and apply scientific ideas used to interpret their general structure, function and organization

5.3.1.2. GLO 2: Investigate and describe the role of cells within living things

5.3.1.3. GLO 3: Interpret the healthy function of human body systems, and illustrate ways the body reacts to internal and external stimuli

5.3.1.4. GLO 4: Describe areas of scientific investigation leading to new knowledge about body systems and to new medical applications

5.4. Other Connections

5.4.1. BIO 20 Unit D: Human Systems

5.4.1.1. GLO 1: Explain how the human digestive and respiratory systems exchange energy and matter with the environment

5.4.1.2. GLO 2: Explain the role of the circulatory and defence systems in maintaining an internal equilibrium

5.4.1.3. GLO 3: Explain the role of the excretory system in maintaining an internal equilibrium in humans through the exchange of energy and matter with the environment

5.4.1.4. GLO 4: Explain the role of the motor system in the function of other body systems

5.4.2. SCI 30 Unit A: Living Systems Respond to Their Environment

5.4.2.1. GLO 1: Analyze how the human circulatory system facilitates interaction between blood cells and the external environment and investigate cardiovascular health

5.4.2.2. GLO 2: Analyze the defense echanisms used by the human body to protect itself from pathogens found in the external environment

5.4.2.3. GLO 3: Apply the principles of heredity and molecular genetics to explain how human diseases can arise from inherited traits, the risks and benefits of genetic technology, and the need for ethical considerations in the application of scientific knowledge

6. How are these processes the same between plants/animals? How are they different?

6.1. SCI 10 Unit C: Cycling of Matter in Living Systems

6.1.1. GLO 2: Describe the function of cell organelles and structures in a cell, in terms of life processes, and use models to explain these processes and their applications

6.1.1.1. SLO 2.5: Compare the structure, chemical composition and function of plant and animal cells, and describe the complementary nature of the structure and function of plant and animal cells

6.1.2. GLO 3: Analyze plants as an example of a multicellular organism with specialized structures at the cellular, tissue and system levels

6.1.2.1. SLO 3.1: Explain why, when a single-celled organism or colony of single-celled organisms reaches a certain size, it requires a multicellular level of organization, and relate this to the specialization of cells, tissues and systems in plants

6.1.2.2. SLO 3.2: Describe how the cells of the leaf system have a variety of specialized structures and functions; i.e., epidermis including guard cells, palisade tissue cells, spongy tissue cells, and phloem and xylem vascular tissue cells to support the process of photosynthesis

6.1.2.3. SLO 3.3: Explain and investigate the transport system in plants; i.e., xylem and phloem tissues and the processes of transpiration, including the cohesion and adhesion properties of water, turgor pressure and osmosis; diffusion, active transport and root pressure in root hairs

6.1.2.4. SLO 3.4: Explain and investigate the gas exchange system in plants; i.e., lenticels, guard cells, stomata and the process of diffusion

6.1.2.5. SLO 3.5: Explain and investigate phototropism and gravitropism as examples of control systems in plants

6.1.2.6. SLO 3.6: Trace the development of theories of phototropism and gravitropism

6.1.3. Skill - Performing and Recording: Conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables, and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

6.1.3.1. Carry out procedures, controlling the major variables and adapting or extending procedures

6.1.3.2. Use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data

6.1.3.3. Compile and organize data, using appropriate formats and data treatments to facilitate interpretation of the data

6.1.3.4. Use library and electronic research tools to collect information on a given topic

6.1.3.5. Select and integrate information from various print and electronic sources or from several parts of the same source

6.1.4. Attitude - Scientific Inquiry: Seek and apply evidence when evaluating alternative approaches to investigations, problems and issues

6.2. Previous Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes

6.2.1. Grade 9 Mathematics

6.2.1.1. Graph Analysis

6.2.1.1.1. Specific Outcome 2: Patterns and Relations

6.2.1.2. Scale Diagrams

6.2.1.2.1. Specific Outcome 4: Shape and Space

6.2.2. SCI 7 Unit B: Plants for Food and Fibre

6.2.2.1. GLO 1: Investigate plant uses; and identify links among needs, technologies, products and impacts

6.2.2.2. GLO 2: Investigate life processes and structures of plants, and interpret related characteristics and needs of plants in a local environment

6.2.2.3. GLO 3: Analyze plant environments, and identify impacts of specific factors and controls

6.2.2.4. GLO 4: Identify and interpret relationships among human needs, technologies, environments, and the culture and use of living things as sources of food and fibre

6.2.3. SCI 8 Unit B: Cells and Systems

6.2.3.1. GLO 1: Investigate living things; and identify and apply scientific ideas used to interpret their general structure, function and organization

6.2.3.2. GLO 2: Investigate and describe the role of cells within living things

6.2.3.3. GLO 3: Interpret the healthy function of human body systems, and illustrate ways the body reacts to internal and external stimuli

6.2.3.4. GLO 4: Describe areas of scientific investigation leading to new knowledge about body systems and to new medical applications

6.2.4. SCI 9 Unit A: Biological Diversity

6.2.4.1. GLO 1: Investigate and interpret diversity among species and within species, and describe how diversity contributes to species survival

6.2.4.2. GLO 2: Investigate the nature of reproductive processes and their role in transmitting species characteristics

6.2.4.3. GLO 3: Describe, in general terms, the role of genetic materials in the continuity and variation of species characteristics; and investigate and interpret related technologies

6.2.4.4. GLO 4: Identify impacts of human action on species survival and variation within species, and analyze related issues for personal and public decision making

6.3. Other Connections

6.3.1. BIO 20 Unit C: Photosynthesis & Cellular Respiration

6.3.1.1. GLO 1: Relate photosynthesis to storage of energy in organic compounds

6.3.1.2. GLO 2: Explain the role of cellular respiration in releasing potential energy from organic compounds

6.3.2. Indigenous Ways of Knowing

6.3.2.1. Acknowledge the contributions of Aboriginal peoples to understandings of the natural world

6.3.2.2. Support relational thinking by integrating learning from various disciplines of science

6.3.2.3. Develop the concept of our connectivity to the natural world and the importance of caring for the environment

6.3.2.4. Foster the development of positive attitudes by providing experiences that encourage all students to feel confident about their ability to succeed in science

6.3.3. Beyond the Classroom

6.3.3.1. Tissue Regeneration (Nature of Science)

6.3.4. Social Studies 10

6.3.4.1. GLO 2: Assess the impacts of historical globalization on Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples

6.3.4.1.1. SLO 2.6: Examine impacts of cultural contact between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples (exchange of goods and technologies, depopulation, influences on government and social institutions)

6.3.5. Aboriginal Studies 10 - Theme II: Aboriginal Worldviews

6.3.5.1. GLO 1: Demonstrate understanding of aspects of Aboriginal spirituality and worldviews.

6.3.5.1.1. SLO 1: Demonstrate understanding that spirituality is fundamental to traditional Aboriginal worldviews: - examine animate and inanimate objects as interrelated - examine living in harmony and unity as essential - examine sharing and generosity in traditional Aboriginal cultures