OCT EXPECTATION- PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITEIS- Developing confidence in making contributions...

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OCT EXPECTATION- PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITEIS- Developing confidence in making contributions to a collaborative professional learning community experience (for example, course based book study or learning team) and reflecting upon the link between teacher learning and student learning by Mind Map: OCT EXPECTATION- PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITEIS- Developing confidence in making contributions to a collaborative professional learning community experience (for example, course based book study or learning team) and reflecting upon the link between teacher learning and student learning

1. Material Modified and taken from What Is a Professional Learning Community?-Richard DuFour, Professional Learning Communities- By Bonnie Benard and Professional Learning Communities: A Model for Ontario Schools

2. With Learning communites

2.1. Teachers collaborated on teaching and learning.

2.2. teacher developed expertise through shared knowledge

2.3. teaching was driven by the belief that all students can learn

2.4. Active student engagement

2.5. Enhanced student learning

2.6. Comment- If learning communities are working well then there tends to be more teacher satisfaction and higher morale. teachers feel more effective in the classroom and have higher student success.

3. Learning Communities Lieberman and Miller page.16

4. What happens in schools?

4.1. Without Leaning Communities

4.1.1. Teachers work in isolation

4.1.2. Have little opportunity to talk and engage with one another

4.1.3. Instruction is more text focused and teacher directed

4.1.4. Students work in isolation

4.1.5. Routine assignments

4.1.6. Educators graded on the curve

5. What is a Professional Learning Community?

5.1. Professional learning communities are groups that meet regularly for the purpose of increasing their own learning and that of their students.

5.1.1. Comment- There are many different definitions of what a PLC is. However at its core the main goal is improve student achievement.

5.2. Who is involved?

5.2.1. Starts with a group of teachers and principal

5.2.2. This group can merge with other learning networks which can include.

5.2.2.1. Groups of schools

5.2.2.2. Support Staff

5.2.2.3. Superintendants

5.2.2.4. Directors

5.2.2.5. Parents

6. Resources http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/plc.pdf Professional Learning Communities: A Model for Ontario Schools http://tribes.com/about/professional-learning-communities/ Professional Learning Communities- By Bonnie Benard http://professionallyspeaking.oct.ca/june_2005/plc.asp Professional Learning Communities: Model for collaborative teaching or the latest bandwagon? by Leanne Miller http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/may04/vol61/num08/What-Is-a-Professional-Learning-Community%C2%A2.aspx What Is a Professional Learning Community?-Richard DuFour http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/best-practices-for-professional-learning-communities.shtml Best Practices for Professional Learning Communities http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alma_Harris/publication/249752354_Professional_learning_communities_and_system_improvement/links/0deec538876907eea3000000.pdf Professional Learning Communities and System Improvement- Alma Harris and Michelle Jones http://learningforward.org/docs/august-2011/lieberman324.pdf?sfvrsn=2 LEARNING COMMUNITIES- The starting point for professional learning is in schools and classrooms by Ann Lieberman and Lynne Miller

7. Components of a Professional Learning Community.

7.1. 1. Ensuring Learning for all students

7.1.1. What do we want each student to learn?

7.1.2. How will we know when each student has learned it?

7.1.3. How will we respond when a student experiences difficulty learning?

7.1.3.1. Comment- On of the interesting parts of a PLC is that instead of just having one teacher solve the problem or challenge it is a group doing it together.

7.2. 2. Focus on Results

7.2.1. Identify the current level of the Student/Subject

7.2.2. Establish a goal to improve the current level

7.2.3. Work together to achieve that goal

7.2.4. Provide periodic evidence of progress

7.2.5. Comment- Collecting data is very important to this process. Decisions on where to go with student learning are made based on assessment that includes observation, analysis of student work, and data collected.

7.3. 3. Relationships

7.3.1. Sharing with others

7.3.2. Open discussion of beliefs and practices

7.3.3. Being open to question and inquiry

7.3.4. Ecouraging feedback

7.3.5. Comment- This I think this a challenge in the PLC. Teachers need to be confident and open with other teachers. In these types of situations people can get defensive if their teaching practices and viewpoints are different. There is sometimes conflict. This however is a good moment to strengthen relationships with other teachers and be comfortable with open discussions about teaching practices.

7.4. 4. Collaborative Inquiry

7.4.1. Team Teaching

7.4.2. Teacher Moderation

7.4.3. Study Groups

7.4.4. Action Research

7.4.5. Classroom Walk-Throughs

7.4.6. Mentoring

7.4.7. Peer Coaching

7.4.8. Comment- This collaboration between teachers gives such a great opportunity to share ideas and data with one another. I am fortunate enough that I work in a school that collaborates quite a bit. Each teacher has a teaching partner and we work together to come up with lessons and forms of assessment for our students. We also address any problems we have with each other. In our school we also collaborate on curriculum and determine what the progress of students should be as we progress through the grades.

7.5. 5.Leadership

7.5.1. Leaders need to

7.5.1.1. promote supportive environments

7.5.1.2. Foster reflection

7.5.1.3. Encourage risk taking

7.5.1.4. Challenge status quo when it comes to student learning.

7.5.2. Comment- PLC's require good leaders. It can start with a principal or VP then progress to a senior staff member or team leader. I think that the leader should act more as a facilitator guiding the PLC rather than one who dictates what happens. It is important that the leader keeps everyone on track and mediates any disagreements or conflict.

7.6. 6. Alignmnet

7.6.1. Teachers from the same grade or division collaborate to promote high levels of learning in each classroom.

7.6.2. Staff accept the responsibility of the success of all students, not just their class or grade.

7.6.3. Comment- In terms of alignment I think it is important that everyone is on the same page and works towards a common goal. Some things we have done in our own school it to collaborate and ensure that marking and assessment is clear. We try and make sure all teachers are aligned in how they assess and evaluate students.

8. Material taken and Modified from Learning Communities Lieberman and Miller page.17

9. Taken and Modified From Professional Learning Communities: A Model for Ontario Schools

10. Challenges of having a PLC

10.1. Cultural Change

10.2. Structural Change

10.3. Time

10.4. PLC Sustainment

10.5. Comment- PLCs can promote many positive changes in the school. However with change comes challenges. Changing the culture and structure of the school can cause conflict and unease. It takes time for people to accept a different approach to help student learning. Not only is it structurally and culturally challenging but PLCs require time to create. If not supported properly then what good has been done can be lost. Creating a culture of shared values, collaboration, and commitment to learning of teachers and students requires that people work hard to maintain it.

11. Material taken and Modified from LEARNING COMMUNITIES- The starting point for professional learning is in schools and classrooms by Ann Lieberman and Lynne Miller and Professional Learning Communities and System Improvement- Alma Harris and Michelle Jones