Two Language Educational Instruction Programs Compared ADRIAN MOORE - TEACH-NOW M2U5A2(Part 2)

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Two Language Educational Instruction Programs Compared ADRIAN MOORE - TEACH-NOW M2U5A2(Part 2) by Mind Map: Two Language Educational Instruction Programs Compared    ADRIAN MOORE - TEACH-NOW M2U5A2(Part 2)

1. PULL-OUT

1.1. Use

1.1.1. ELLs of all levels

1.1.2. Mostly Elementary level students

1.2. Objectives

1.2.1. Rapid proficiency improvement

1.3. Standards

1.3.1. In Montgomery County Public Schools District, ELL PULL-OUTs are evaluated under the applicable standards for English Language Learners - the WIDA standards: English language learners

1.3.1.1. WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards

1.3.1.1.1. 1: ELLs communicate for Social and Instructional purposes within the school setting

1.3.1.1.2. 2: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts

1.3.1.1.3. 3: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Mathematics

1.3.1.1.4. 4: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science

1.3.1.1.5. 5: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies

1.3.1.2. WIDA Proficiency Levels

1.3.1.2.1. 1: Entering – A student requires significant visual cues to support comprehension and responds in single words or set phrases using the words that are most common and frequent in English

1.3.1.2.2. aa

1.3.1.2.3. 3: Developing – A student understands and uses specific language related to various topics and uses expanded sentences in expanded discourse and makes some errors that can confuse communication

1.3.1.2.4. 4: Expanding – A student understands and uses more complex language including some technical vocabulary and makes errors that do not impeded communication

1.3.1.2.5. 5: Bridging – A student is using language to communicate at a level approaching the proficiency of English-proficient peers

1.3.1.2.6. 6-Reaching – A student is using language to communicate at a level comparable to that of English-proficient peers

1.4. Classroom Support Strategies

1.4.1. Provide subject vocabulary to ELL Specialist Teacher for inclusion in language lessons where possible

1.4.2. Close liaison with ELL Specialist Teacher to ensure minimum disruption to ELL's subject content and concepts acquisition

1.4.3. Close liaison with ELL Specialist Teacher to ensure mainstream classroom reinforcement of language worked on during the ELL Specialist class

1.4.4. Consider the multicultural aspects of SDAIE in order to promote inclusion and respect

1.4.5. Consider TESOL program carefully to ensure best practice PULL-OUT practice: http://www.tesol.org/docs/books/bk_prek-12elpstandards_framework_318.pdf?sfvrsn=2

1.5. Advantages

1.5.1. Provision of a secure environment in which ELLs can ask questions and practice their English and thus avoid the peer pressure to speak correctly in the mainstream class

1.5.2. Provision of specialist and language level targeted instruction by a qualified ESL teacher

1.5.3. Confidence building - new ELLs may feel isolated when they cannot initially keep up in the mainstream classes, making them part of a group of ELLs who have the same issues and concerns may help them to acclimate

1.6. Disadvantages

1.6.1. ESL instructional periods are often too short and comprise too broad a range of ELL ages, abilities and linguistic needs.

1.6.2. Pulled-out ELLs miss topics being covered in class and that makes it even harder for them to catch up on subject content and concepts afterwards.

1.6.2.1. TESOL program seeks to remedy this by more closely linking the ELL instruction with what is being undertaken in the classroom. Thus, its standards are linked to English proficiency in specific subject areas such as science and the humanities and goes from a Beginning level through to a Bridging level which involves fluent expression and communication

1.6.3. ELLs will, to some extent at least, be undermined by having the ELLs marked out as a separated group that needs to leave the classroom for some if its instruction

1.6.4. Pull-out judged to be the most expensive and the least effective LIEP

2. SDAIE

2.1. Use

2.1.1. ELL's with a limited command of English

2.2. Objectives

2.2.1. ELL mastery of English

2.2.2. No diminution in subject content and concept learning

2.3. Standards

2.3.1. Common Core State Standards or other state standards for subject content, concept and skills learning

2.4. Classroom Teaching Strategies

2.4.1. Strategies

2.4.1.1. Metacognitive Development: Providing students with skills and vocabulary to talk about their learning (Examples: self assessments, note taking and studying techniques, and vocabulary assignments)

2.4.1.2. Bridging: Building on previous knowledge and establishing a link between the students and the material (Examples: think-pair-share, quick-writes, and anticipatory charts)

2.4.1.3. Schema-Building: Helping students see the relationships between various concepts (Examples: compare and contrast, jigsaw learning, peer teaching, and projects)

2.4.1.4. Contextualization: Familiarizes unknown concepts through direct experience (Examples: demonstrations, media, manipulatives, repetition, and local opportunities)

2.4.1.5. Text Representation: Inviting students to extend their understandings of text and apply them in a new way (Examples: student created drawings, posters, videos, and games)

2.4.1.6. Modeling: Speaking slowly and clearly, modeling the language you want students to use, and providing samples of student work

2.4.2. General Strategies

2.4.2.1. Know who your ELL students are and their proficiency in English

2.4.2.1.1. Know who your ELL students are and their proficiency in English

2.4.2.2. set high expectations for ELLs

2.4.2.3. Embed multicultural education throughout the curriculum, not just a "Heroes and Holidays" approach where other cultures are mentioned on special days

2.4.2.4. Assess and utilize the background knowledge of your students

2.4.2.5. Pronounce student names correctly to help develop rapport

2.4.2.6. Use technology such as class websites, blogs, and videos (many students are not familiar with American activities)

2.4.2.7. Avoid testing in English exclusively for ELLs who may not be able to demonstrate what they know in English

2.4.2.8. Have structured note-taking formats such as graphic organizers for lectures

2.4.2.9. Utilize classroom protocols and routines

2.4.2.10. Utilize music when possible

2.4.2.11. Use bilingual students as helpers

2.4.3. Instructional Strategies

2.4.3.1. Slow down your speech and use shorter sentences, present tense of words, synonyms, examples, gestures, and demonstrations. Also avoid expressions or sayings that are only common in the United States

2.4.3.2. Use as many mediums as possible to convey information e.g. oral, written, videos, teacher demonstration, student demonstration

2.4.3.3. Use think-alouds and think-pair-shares when asking questions, and don't forget to give students enough time to process the question

2.4.3.4. Use bilingual handouts and cue lists

2.4.3.5. Use metaphors and imagery for cues

2.4.4. Environmental Strategies

2.4.4.1. Create print-rich environments using bulletin boards with articles on sports and physical activity, gameplay strategies of the day, words of the day

2.4.4.1.1. Create print-rich environments using bulletin boards with articles on sports and physical activity, gameplay strategies of the day, words of the day,

2.4.4.2. Use visual displays, portable white boards, and posters when giving instructions

2.4.4.3. Use Word Walls - alphabetically arranged high-frequency words displayed at an easy access point for students

2.4.5. Assignment Strategies

2.4.5.1. Quick writes, word sorts, and journal writing

2.4.5.2. Learning stations to reinforce concepts and skills previously taught

2.4.5.3. Introduce vocabulary in a fun way such as a Word Search or Cross Word

2.4.5.4. Have students create new games

2.4.5.5. Use cooperative learning such as jigsaw learning and peer observations

2.4.5.6. Use task cards to give students opportunities to take responsibility for their own

2.4.5.7. Use newspapers, magazines, and web sites in assignments

2.4.5.8. Involve librarians in assignments

2.4.5.9. Have ELL students work with teachers to create handouts in multiple languages

2.5. Advantages

2.5.1. Integrates ELLs into the classroom

2.5.2. Brings more variety to all students' learning

2.5.3. Adds a multi-cultural dimension to all students' learning

2.5.4. Accelerates ELL's subject content and concepts learning

2.5.5. Techniques used may also benefit other students with Learning Difficulties

2.5.6. Teacher responsibility for ELL Program more clearly defined

2.6. Disadvantages

2.6.1. Heavy Teacher Preparation load in preparing additional support materials