ED 302 Notes K.Smith

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ED 302 Notes K.Smith by Mind Map: ED 302 Notes K.Smith

1. 1. Foundations of Education

1.1. 4 issues in education

1.1.1. 1. Poverty in schools

1.1.2. 2. Reduction of literacy

1.1.3. 3. Assessment issues

1.1.4. 4. School funding

2. 4. Sociology of Educaton

2.1. Theories:

2.1.1. 1. Functional

2.1.2. 2. Interactional

2.1.3. 3. Conflict

2.2. 4 Levels:

2.2.1. Societal

2.2.1.1. Structure of Dominance

2.2.1.1.1. Sociological Idealogies

2.2.2. Intsitutional

2.2.2.1. Educational Structures

2.2.2.1.1. Educational Ideologies Concepts

2.2.3. Interpersonal

2.2.3.1. Teachers' Expectations

2.2.3.1.1. Educational Interactions

2.2.4. Intrapsychic

2.2.4.1. Educational Outcome

2.2.4.1.1. Cognitive

3. 2. Politics of Education

3.1. Conservative Prospective

3.1.1. Traditionalist

3.1.1.1. Individuals must take on initiative and work hard.

3.1.1.2. Must compete in social environment to survive.

3.1.2. Maintains positive view of U.S. and societal issues.

3.1.3. Schools must provide "training" to ensure students receive tools to work hard and succeed in the work force.

3.1.4. Problems in society result from decline of standards, literacy, values, and authority.

3.1.5. Stick to basics: Reading, writing, mathematics.

3.2. Liberal Perspective

3.2.1. Progressive

3.2.1.1. Equality

3.2.2. Students should have equal opportunity to succeed.

3.2.3. Believes traditional curriculum disregards diversity.

3.3. Radical Perspective

3.4. Neo-Liberal Perspective

4. 3. History of Education

4.1. School Funding

4.1.1. 1785, 1787 Land Ordinance Act and Northwest Ordinance mandated schools in each town (gave place) and the town had to pay for it (property tax).

4.1.2. Current school funding comes from state funds, local sales tax, property tax, and a small percent from federal government.

4.2. 1821 First public high school

4.3. 1855 First public kindergarten

4.4. 1896 Plessy vs. Ferguson

4.4.1. "separate but equal"

4.5. 1909 First junior high

4.6. 1919 Progressive education*

4.7. 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education

4.7.1. overturned Plessy vs. Ferguson

4.7.2. determined separate was not equal and segregation was unconstitutional

4.8. 1975 Individuals with disabilities act

4.9. 2002 No child left behind

5. 5. Philosophy of Education

5.1. A. Realism/Essentialism

5.1.1. teacher led/traditional

5.1.2. back to basics (r,w,a)

5.1.3. orderly classroom/direct instruction

5.2. B. Idealism/Perennialism

5.2.1. teacher led/traditional

5.2.2. focuses on classic lit./the "great books"

5.2.3. electives are unnecessary/few if no texts

5.3. C. Pragmatism/Progressivism

5.3.1. student led

5.3.2. inquiry method/scientific method

5.3.3. learning by doing

5.3.4. project-based learning/group and collaborative work

5.4. D. Neo-Marxism

5.4.1. student led

5.4.2. focusing on bettering society/social awareness

5.5. E. Existentialism

5.5.1. student led

5.5.2. students choose how and when to learn

5.5.3. shuns traditional curriculum

6. 6. Schools as Organizations

6.1. Government and Schools

6.1.1. Consolidation in last 80 years

6.1.1.1. more effecient

6.1.1.2. cost effective

6.2. Segregation in Schools

6.2.1. de facto

6.3. Culture of Schools

6.3.1. definite population

6.3.2. defined political structure

6.3.3. network of social relationships

7. 9. Explanations of Educational Inequality

7.1. Functionalist

7.1.1. "just society"

7.1.2. school will produce unequal results because of individual differences

7.2. Conflict

7.2.1. schooling reproduces instead of eliminates inequality

7.3. Interactionalist

7.3.1. we must understand how people interact on a daily basis

7.4. Student Centered Explinations

7.4.1. Genetic Theory

7.4.2. Cultural Deprivation Theory

7.4.3. Cultural Difference Theory

7.5. School Centered Explinations

7.5.1. financing

7.5.2. climate

7.5.3. pedagogic practices

7.5.4. effective vs. ineffective

7.5.4.1. Effective schools have high expectations, strong leadership, accountability for all, time on task, and flexibility.

8. 7. The Transmission of Knowledge

8.1. History and Philosophy of Curriculum

8.1.1. social effeciency

8.1.2. developmentalist curriculum

8.1.3. romantic progressivism

8.1.4. social meliorist curriculum

8.2. Politics of Curriculum

8.3. Sociology of Curriculum

8.3.1. what is taught

8.3.2. why is it taught

8.3.3. Modern Functionalist Theory

8.4. Pedagogic Practices

8.4.1. How curriculum is taught

8.4.1.1. What are appropriate teaching practices?

8.4.2. Different views/philosophies

9. 8. Equality of Opportunity

9.1. Society is Stratified

9.1.1. class, race, gender

9.2. Calculating Outcomes

9.3. School Differences

9.3.1. The Coleman Study

9.4. Attainment and Achievement

9.5. School Segregation

9.5.1. inequality

9.5.1.1. mobility or reproduction?

10. 10. Educcation Reform and School Improvement

10.1. Effective Teachers

10.2. Educational Reform

10.2.1. Two Waves:

10.2.1.1. 1. State level - focused on accountability and achievement issues.

10.2.1.2. 2. Decentralized - targeted structure and processes of schools.

10.3. Federal Involvement

10.3.1. Goals 2000

10.3.2. NCLB

10.3.3. Race to the Top

10.4. School-Based Reforms

10.4.1. School Choice

10.4.2. Charter Schools

10.4.3. Tuition Vouchers

10.5. Teacher Quality and the Effective School Movement