American Independence

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American Independence by Mind Map: American Independence

1. Acts Against Authority

1.1. In England

1.1.1. English Bill of Rights

1.1.2. The Magna Carta

1.1.3. The Glorious Revolution

1.2. In America

1.2.1. Non-Importation Agreements

1.2.2. Sons of Liberty

1.2.3. Boston Tea Party

1.2.4. Declaration of Rights and Grievances

1.2.5. Gaspee Affair

1.2.6. Declaration of Independence

2. Self Government

2.1. Mayflower Compact

2.2. House of Burgesses

2.3. The General Court

2.4. Fundamental Orders of Connecticut

2.5. Town Meetings

2.6. Committees of Correspondence

2.7. First Continental Congress

2.8. Second Continental Congress

3. New Ideas

3.1. Enlightenment

3.1.1. Rationalism

3.1.2. New Philosophies

3.1.2.1. Freedom of Speech

3.1.2.2. Checks and Balances

3.1.2.3. Social Contracts

3.1.2.4. Separation of Powers

3.1.2.4.1. The Judicial Branch

3.1.2.4.2. The Executive Branch

3.1.2.4.3. The Legislative Branch

3.1.2.5. g

3.1.3. Enlightenment Thinkers/Philosophers

3.1.3.1. Thomas Hobbes

3.1.3.2. Jean-Jacques Rousseau

3.1.3.3. Baron de Montesquieu

3.1.3.4. Voltaire

3.1.3.5. Thomas Paine

3.1.3.5.1. Common sense

3.1.3.6. John Locke

3.1.3.6.1. Natural Rights

3.2. The First Great Awakening

3.2.1. Individualism

3.2.2. Pietism

3.2.3. Religious Diversity

3.2.4. Revivals

3.2.4.1. Jonathan Edwards

3.2.4.2. George Whitefield

4. British Offenses

4.1. Policies

4.1.1. Stamp Act

4.1.1.1. George Grenville

4.1.2. Townshend Acts

4.1.3. Declaratory Acts

4.1.4. Writ of Assistance

4.1.5. Tea Act

4.1.6. Currency Act

4.1.7. Coercive Acts

4.1.8. Mercantilism

4.1.9. Proclamation of 1763

4.1.10. Quartering Act

4.2. Other

4.2.1. French and Indian War

4.2.2. Salutatory Neglect

4.2.3. Vice-Admiralty Court in Halifax

4.2.4. Boston Massacre

4.2.5. Siege of Boston

5. American Responses

5.1. Stamp Act Congress

5.2. Sons of Liberty

5.2.1. Boston Tea Party

5.3. Declaration of Rights and Grievances

5.4. Non-Importation Agreements

5.5. Revenue Act

5.6. Continental Association

5.7. Gaspee Affair

5.8. Olive Branch Petition

5.9. Suffolk Resolves

5.10. Battle of Lexington and Concord

6. The Constitution of the United States

6.1. Men Involved

6.1.1. John Adams

6.1.2. George Washington

6.1.2.1. First President

6.1.3. Rodger Sherman

6.1.4. Benjamin Franklin

6.1.5. James Madison

6.1.6. Alexander Hamilton

6.1.6.1. Federalist

6.1.7. Thomas Jefferson

6.1.7.1. Antifederalist

6.2. Ideas Used to Build Government

6.2.1. Republic

6.2.2. Mobocracy

6.2.2.1. Government lead by the masses themselves

6.2.3. Representative Democracy

6.2.3.1. Government led by representatives of the masses

6.2.4. Popular Sovereignty

6.2.5. Abolition

6.2.5.1. Virginia’s Declaration of Rights

6.2.6. Individual Rights

6.2.6.1. Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom

6.3. Leading Up to and After...

6.3.1. Articles of Confederation

6.3.1.1. Revised due to Shay's Rebellion

6.3.2. The Constitutional Convention

6.3.2.1. Virginia Plan

6.3.2.2. New Jersey Plan

6.3.2.3. The Connecticut Plan

6.3.2.4. The Great Compromise

6.3.2.4.1. Bicameral Legislature

6.3.2.5. Issues and Solution

6.3.2.5.1. Slavery and its affect on the Census

6.3.2.5.2. The Three-Fifths Compromise

6.3.3. Ratification

6.3.4. The Federalist Papers

6.3.4.1. The Bill of Rights

6.3.5. The Land Ordinance of 1785

6.3.6. The Northwest Ordinance

6.3.6.1. New Territory Allowed for New States to be Added