Eastern Shore Food System 2030 - Map L

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Eastern Shore Food System 2030 - Map L by Mind Map: Eastern Shore Food System 2030 - Map L

1. Aquaculture producing fish native

2. Will we have a supply given the California drought causes pressure to have local foods regional?

2.1. Yes

2.2. Market is here. Supply is not

2.2.1. Can we entice more people to grow?

2.3. Fresh or products are healthier when handled less

2.3.1. Fact or opinion?

2.4. Midwest and East will produce more veggies

3. New generation of farmers takes over.

3.1. And thrive

3.1.1. Farmer viability used to include government subsidy. Are we subsidizing the smaller farmers by 2030? We might need to change from macro scale corn/soy farm subsidies to also include diverse specialty crops.

3.1.1.1. Risk management shifting to crop insurance for commodities market development, technology needed. For small, diversified farms

3.1.1.1.1. Insurance is insurance it's not the answer. Creating less roadblocks for food distribution and for diversification is needed

3.1.1.1.2. It would be good to find a way to support policies that do more of this

3.1.1.1.3. Generally need to transition from bill grain subsidies to pasture animal and vegetable crop production

3.1.1.2. Some USDA programs are trending this way. Income limitations divergent money to smaller operations

3.1.1.2.1. USDA programs exist to help schools, daycare and eldercare purchase locally

4. The 65 year old farmer will be 80

4.1. Land owners need to be part of solution – lease land to new farmer in exchange for food, knowledge that their land put to good use, and little cash they get from grain

4.2. Changing, but cost of land makes it hard for young farmers to start up

4.2.1. Agree, unless inherit farm, hard to start on shore

5. Need for local markets

5.1. We have mastered markets within 200 miles – from Touchman to New York. New York is identify Delmarva as a future source of its food

5.2. Schools/hospitals/daycare/eldercare

5.2.1. Who helps offset the lower price of foods to these institutions?

5.3. How local is local?

5.3.1. Entire MidAtlantic region

5.4. Do you mean wholesale and retail demand?

5.4.1. More money directly to producers – local markets

5.4.1.1. More of the food money directly to the producer!

5.4.1.2. Producers needed food hub distribution to markets

5.4.1.2.1. What about multiform multi CSA instead of a warehouse?

5.4.1.2.2. Food hubs need Mid Shore aggregation to make logistics financially sustainable

5.4.1.2.3. Agreed – a common point make packing easier – – hence the regional branding which could also help market. Also makes distribution to mid Atlantic easier

5.4.1.3. Mobile food processing facilities

5.4.1.3.1. And mobile veggie vans. Agree great idea

5.4.1.3.2. Nice idea

5.4.1.4. Local restaurants advertise the use local farm products

5.4.2. Wholesale pays less, allows more volume

5.4.2.1. Maybe it's different. Food aggregation options for the different markets are wholesale or retail or more for direct to consumer?

5.4.2.1.1. Yes

5.4.2.1.2. Additional problems with retail as county zoning requirements can be cost prohibitive

5.4.2.1.3. Challenge the retail include complexities of marketplace. Not just production. Help with marketing key.

6. Technology will increase yields and diversity of crops

6.1. Diverse crops are also more marketable. How can we help those new specialty foods begin?

6.1.1. Yes

6.1.2. Educate the public about the nutritional value of fresh, local veggies, fruits, and pastored meat – and their public environmental benefit if sustainably produced

6.2. Alternative uses for livestock, manure and food waste

6.3. Aquaculture/aqua ponies

6.3.1. Can we grow here because we may be underwater?

6.3.1.1. Yes

6.4. Would it be better to focus on nutrients not yield. Hybrid focused on yield, transporting rather than tasting nutrient might not be serving as well

7. Much the same as 2015

8. Labor will challenge increased diversification

8.1. Creators need for more and smaller producers

8.2. FFA programs would help with labor and learning viable agricultural options instead of full-scale cash grain farming

8.2.1. Want to hear more about how we can make this happen

8.2.1.1. Many local Farm Bureaus have made this happen

8.2.2. There are great learning resources – future harvest/CASA annual conference and internships, Pa. Association of Sustainable As. Annual conference

8.2.2.1. There is still a need for workers for produce farms. More than currently are without water and other illegal options

8.3. How about fair market prices of produce and meats to get farmers and labor for fair pay?

8.3.1. A+

9. Eastern shore farmers can be supplier of fresh, diverse products to Mid Atlantic market

9.1. Agree

9.2. Environmentally sustainable produce must be valued – not necessarily organic but better strips around all production area and pasture animals

9.2.1. Where is all this land giving to come from for pasture based in buffer strips? Will that cost farmer or county?

9.3. Based on current farming trends, is there diversity?

9.3.1. Eastern shore has a very diverse agriculture landscape corn, beans, vegetables, Aqua culture

9.3.1.1. Could do a lot more here – land Chester County Pennsylvania a grew model

9.3.1.2. Diverse production to be scaled up to supply and meet consumer/institution/store demand

9.3.1.2.1. We need more year-round growing (hoop house) to support a stable labor force and meet year around demand by buyers

9.3.2. Agreed the diversity of farm products is needed for a balanced nutrition

9.3.2.1. What are we missing, if anything?

9.3.2.1.1. What about heritage crop?

9.3.2.1.2. Water men in this conversation?

9.3.3. Major agriculture production is still cash rain, but diversity to niche markets are occurring

9.3.3.1. Agree

9.3.3.2. Agree

9.3.3.3. School food currently lack local products. Farm, transportation, local jobs

9.3.3.3.1. Parents will need to push school leaders to improve purchasing practices, for more local food

9.3.3.3.2. Agree and to sell to school and institution to know markets (like hospitals) means a lower price. Can the other market consumers pay a higher price help support this?

9.3.3.3.3. School boards need to see their role as anger institutions. RE: food buying power

9.3.3.4. Grain predominates only because of subsidies the market must be permitted to speak

9.3.3.4.1. And soils, climate, market

9.3.3.5. Niche markets are financially viable – how do they get started to attract new younger farmers?

9.3.3.5.1. School garden/agricultural programs

9.3.3.5.2. That is the conundrum!