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SustainAbilityJune 2011 by Mind Map: SustainAbilityJune 2011
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SustainAbilityJune 2011

Event Organization

Brian Hughes

Jeff Smith

Crystal Froese

crystal@cfroese.com (250) 490-6586

Nikos Theodosakis

Lori Grant

Hugh McClennan Tina Baird Alison Markin

Public Relations & Marketing

Social Media Campaign

Create you tube presence

TEDx Events Facebook

Twitter feed throughout event

Press Releases

f) Issuing a Press Release All press releases should be submitted, in advance, to Laura Galloway, who handles TED's media relations, for final review and approval. Releases should be sent at least two weeks before your event -- earlier if possible. Please allow 48 hours for release turnaround and approval.   Your email to Laura Galloway should include: The date on which the release will be sent The method by which the release will be sent (formal service, e.g. PR Newswire, or your own media list)   Quotes: Due to the large number of events, TED does not provide quotes for individual press releases.   Writing the release Your press release must include the following paragraph, amended to fit your specific event:     In the spirit of "ideas worth spreading," TED has created TEDx. TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. Our event is called TEDx[name], where x = independently organized TED event. At TEDx[name], TEDTalks video and live speakers will combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events, including ours, are self-organized. Your press release must also include the following text:   About TED TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. Started as a four-day conference in California 25 years ago, TED has grown to support those world-changing ideas with multiple initiatives. The annual TED Conference invites the world's leading thinkers and doers to speak for 18 minutes. Their talks are then made available, free, at TED.com. TED speakers have included Bill Gates, Al Gore, Jane Goodall, Elizabeth Gilbert, Sir Richard Branson, Nandan Nilekani,Philippe Starck, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Isabel Allende and UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown. The annual TED Conference takes place in Long Beach, California, with simulcast in Palm Springs; TEDGlobal is held each year in Oxford, UK. TED's media initiatives include TED.com, where new TEDTalks are posted daily, and the Open Translation Project, which provides subtitles and interactive transcripts as well as the ability for any TEDTalk to be translated by volunteers worldwide. TED has established the annual TED Prize, where exceptional individuals with a wish to change the world are given the opportunity to put their wishes into action; TEDx, which offers individuals or groups a way to host local, self-organized events around the world, and the TEDFellows program, helping world-changing innovators from around the globe to become part of the TED community and, with its help, amplify the impact of their remarkable projects and activities. Follow TED on Twitter at twitter.com/TEDTalks, or on Facebook at facebook.com/TED. TEDGlobal 2010, "And Now the Good News," will be held July 13-16, 2010, in Oxford, UK. TED2011, "The Rediscovery of Wonder," will be held February 28-March 4, 2011, in Long Beach, California, with the TEDActive simulcast in Palm Springs, California. What to include in your press release: Your event's name -- e.g. TEDxAustin, TEDxDubai Location -- be specific Date and time Whether your event is public or private. (If public, how can people participate?) List of speakers Theme Website and/or social media pages, e.g. Twitter account Live webcast URL Your contact information

Logo Creator

TEDxSpeaker Selection

Economic Sustainability

Bill Rees - UBC Prof. School of Community & Regional Planning.

Mark Holland - Principal HB Lanarc Consultants,

Lorne Whitehead - UBC Prof. Leader of Education Innovation

Brenda Martens - Founder and Principal of Recollective

Sandra Oldfield Tinhorn Creek Winery

Alan Ilicic

Douglas MacLeod

Social Sustainabilty

Hugh McClennan How Laughter Sustains the Soul

Jeanette Armstrong, The En'owkin Way

John Ralston Saul, Sustainabilty of Canadian Culture

Ajahn Sona, Living a zero footprint life

Merle Kindred 778 476 1319 India Sustainability Project, Global Trends in Sustainability

Stephen Joyce

Centre of Excellence

Andrew Hay OC on the CoE

Robert Parlane, RIBA MRAIC LEEDap CEI Architecture Planning Interiors

Other Ideas

Musicians

Kristi Richards

Speaker Prep etc.

Preparing Speaker, Speakers Kit TEDxMcGill

The Perils of Power Point

Sustainability in Education

Sustainable Learning - Nikos Theodosakis

Sunddip Nahal on Sustainability and Education, www.generationed.ca

Environmental Sustainability

Vancouver blogger and Twitterer Raul Pacheco

Jan Voz

Emily C

Robert MacDonald

IDEAS FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR SPEAKERS

Marconi Pereira to tedx_licensees show details 5:58 AM (1 hour ago) It depends on your lineup and the sessions/subjects of your event. If your event is all-day long, it would be nice to let the TEDTalk opening the last session. I would also recommend to follow TED's advice on that subject: TED Program Structure Suggestions: - Think big: Encourage your speakers to connect their work and thinking to big topics -- the universe, the future, global ideas... - Start strong: You'll want to open people's minds right from the start -- so be sure your event has a very strong opening. - Mix it up: Break up your program with thrilling demonstrations and moving performances. Throw in a few shorter talks or counterpoints. - End with emotion: Save the most emotionally gripping speakers and TEDTalks for the end. This is when your attendees are most open to being moved. It will leave them with a feeling that will stay with them -- perhaps motivate them into action. Cheers, Marconi TEDxRiodeJaneiro - Show quoted text - Reply Forward Invite Marconi Pereira to chat Reply Marconi Pereira to tedx_licensees show details 6:08 AM (1 hour ago) Sorry, I forgot to suggest some TEDTalks: - Jill Bolte Taylor (stroke of insight) - Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (creativity, fulfillment and flow) - Sugata Mitra (child-driven education) - Denis Dutton (a Darwinian theory of beauty) - David Gallo (underwater astonishments) - Diana Laufenberg (learning from mistakes) - Benjamin Zander (music and passion) - Barry Schwartz (the paradox of choice) - Sir Ken Robinson (do schools kill creativity)

Online Organization

Website

  Content   Your site should include information about your live speakers, background on the theme you chose, a description of your venue, as well as the basics, such as the date and location of your event and information about TEDx and TED. Introduce your users to TED by embedding TEDTalks on your site. You may not display any content associated with:   Weapons manufacturers Ammunition companies Cigarette companies Online gambling organizations Sex-related businesses Other conferences or seminars   Homepage   Your site's homepage must include the following:   Your TEDx logo. Every instance of your TEDx logo should link to http://www.ted.com/tedx A visible link, on your event's homepage, to the TEDx program (http://www.ted.com/tedx) Language that describes TEDx: What is TEDx? In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TED has created a program called TEDx. TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. Our event is called TEDx[name], where x = independently organized TED event. At our TEDx[name] event, TEDTalks video and live speakers will combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events, including ours, are self-organized.   Text in the footer that states "This independent TEDx event is operated under license from TED."   About page   Your site must have an "About" page which includes the following language, in this order:   About TEDx, x = independently organized event   In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.) About TED   TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. Started as a four-day conference in California 25 years ago, TED has grown to support those world-changing ideas with multiple initiatives. The annual TED Conference invites the world's leading thinkers and doers to speak for 18 minutes. Their talks are then made available, free, at TED.com. TED speakers have included Bill Gates, Al Gore, Jane Goodall, Elizabeth Gilbert, Sir Richard Branson, Nandan Nilekani,Philippe Starck, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Isabel Allende and UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown. The annual TED Conference takes place in Long Beach, California, with simulcast in Palm Springs; TEDGlobal is held each year in Oxford, UK. TED's media initiatives include TED.com, where new TEDTalks are posted daily, and the Open Translation Project, which provides subtitles and interactive transcripts as well as the ability for any TEDTalk to be translated by volunteers worldwide. TED has established the annual TED Prize, where exceptional individuals with a wish to change the world are given the opportunity to put their wishes into action; TEDx, which offers individuals or groups a way to host local, self-organized events around the world, and the TEDFellows program, helping world-changing innovators from around the globe to become part of the TED community and, with its help, amplify the impact of their remarkable projects and activities.   Follow TED on Twitter at twitter.com/TEDTalks, or on Facebook at facebook.com/TED.   TEDGlobal 2010, "And Now the Good News," will be held July 13-16, 2010, in Oxford, UK. TED2011, "The Rediscovery of Wonder," will be held February 28-March 4, 2011, in Long Beach, California, with the TEDActive simulcast in Palm Springs, California.   Image use   You may not use the TED logo or TED conference images on your website, or any other promotional materials. You may only use TEDx logos and images. For promotional images -- such as shots of TEDx speakers on stage -- search Flickr for images from other TEDx events. Reach out to the organizers and obtain permission before you display their images.   Sponsors   Sponsor logos or names may not appear on your site's homepage (TED may make an exception in certain cases; email us). Instead, create a separate page dedicated to your sponsors, and link to the page from your site's global navigation bar. Anywhere it appears, the sponsor's logo must be smaller than the TEDx logo.  

Social Media

d) Using Social Media Social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter provide a venue for conversation before and after your event. Your attendees will appreciate having an official space to share ideas and connect with one other. These sites are powerful promotional tools -- we recommend you use them.   Creating a Facebook Page   We suggest you set up a Facebook Page (as opposed to a Group). Why? When a user joins a Facebook Page, the Facebook system sends a notification to all of his or her friends' news feeds.   What to include on your Facebook Page:   Your event's logo -- which must remain legible and proportionate when it is resized "About TEDx" and "About TED" descriptions (find them on our creating a website guide) placed under the "Info" tab in the "Basic info" section Links to http://www.ted.com/tedx and http://www.ted.com under the "Websites" tab   How to engage your Facebook Page fans   Ask for suggestions Announce speakers as you confirm them Post photos: venue shots, speakers Post information about yourself: why you became involved with TEDx Highlight other TEDx events Post daily TEDTalks videos Share a TED Blog post Ask them about their favorite TEDTalks   Share what you're doing with the larger TED community by posting on the official TED Facebook Page.   Using a Twitter account   Register a Twitter username that corresponds exactly to the name of your event (e.g.TEDxTokyo) Use your event's official logo as your Twitter profile picture Tweet everything: planning meetings, speaker announcements, logistics notes Start conversations with other Twitterers (e.g. TEDChris)  

Filming and Sound

Technical Director

Audio Engineer, Presenter Wireless Lavalier/Headpiece, Stage Microphone, Live Music Mics & Line outputs, Output from Presenter Laptops

Video Supervisor Mike Minnions Okanagan College, 5 HD Camera Operators, Assistants, Live Switcher

Web Streaming

Photography, http://tedx.posterous.com/how-to-get-great-photos-of-your-tedx-event

Possible Audio/Video Support, Services, Suppliers, Partners

Skaha Sound (Audio)

SHAW Cable (Live Switching, MultiCams)

CATO Kelowna - volunteers, equipment

How to film a TED Talk

Sponsorships

The Sponsor Search Important to discuss, here, how to actually go out and search for sponsors. Not every company is a good match for a TEDx event. Some are extremely eager, some need a bit of work before they crack. The important thing here is to discuss what tools we can deliver to you, the organizers, to help you in your search for local sponsors. I'd like to work on a database of "pre-approved" sponsors, in a number of categories. Not a marketplace, necessarily, but a section listing past sponsors, to help you get an idea of the type of company we typically approach.   Important points to hit: Pre-approved sponsor list Sponsors you can't approach, for whatever reason Guidelines on sponsorship Discussion--re: sponsorship, why would an organization do such a thing? What's in it for them?   I think it's going to be important to reference a sample budget, at this point. By look at your budget and identifying areas where sponsorship might help, you can structure your search much more effectively.   In-Kind vs Cash What are the different tacks to take with in-kind sponsors, vs cash sponsors? What sort of sponsors might give product, what sort might give cash? How do you help sponsors feel appreciated? etc.     ----------------- (and here's the source thinking for my buildout above. Feel free to comment, or add to this, if there's something else you want me to post! Just make sure to put your name down, so I can give credit where credit is due.)   Brainstorming (lifecycle of a deal): How to start the search--who might one look for? Why would a company want to sponsor TED? What can we offer, and what can we definitely NOT offer Sponsorship levels Making first contact: Sample Outreach letter Sample one-sheet to send along Sample sponsorship deck link to TEDx video, embedded on TED site Meeting with sponsors--how to act, what to bring, what to expect Sample presentation for sponsors If we want to go into detail, we can talk about how to tweak, using powerpoint or keynote, how to set up monitors, etc--maybe keep some links with good information on these fronts, whatever the community wants. Presenting tips What can we offer to sponsors? What is a definite NO for sponsorship offering?  

Build sponsors benefit package

possible sponsors construction company of college?

Connect with Airlines

Connect with local Hotels

List of Sponsors

On Board, Theo's Restaurant - To Host Dinner for Speakers & Event Organizers

To be Contacted, Structurelam ( Nikos), TBD, ORIC, Community Futures

Approaching Sponsors

Overview and Details

SustainAbility

Event Schedule

Opening Ceremony

behind the scenes @ TEDxUBC

Speakers topics/category

Event Countdown

Brainstorm wish list

Tmobile dance doing it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQ3d3KigPQM how to do it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVFNM8f9WnI&feature=related

Connect with Airlines

advertise the event at night using lighting on side of building

Critical Path

create org committee

set meeting dates

create budget

budget template

TEDXMcGill sample budget

detemine speakers

create program

build sponsors package

build PR promo campaign

Venue

Set Design

Stage, Toula Theodosakis, How to design Stage

Special Exhibits

For large events, consider designating areas outside the main auditorium for art, science exhibits, hands-on experiences and overflow seating. TEDx Lab: An area for attendees to try out new software, gadgets, technologies and products Bloggers' Alley: Consider setting up a dedicated bloggers' area outside the auditorium, with desks and power outlets (laptops inside the auditorium can be a distraction) Simulcast Lounge: If you anticipate a large crowd, set up viewing monitors outside the main auditorium

Audience Curation

Ideas

1

Innovation Lounges

I think that the definition of an innovation lounge is like what TED organizes during their conferences : a lounge space with live streaming of the conference and booths of different companies who demo their technology. show details Nov 4 (3 days ago) Correct -- but to be clear these are NOT trade show booths for sponsors, but creative spaces where truly innovative products are demo'd.

What is TEDx

held at the Centre of Excellence Okanagan College Penticton Campus take a tour by clicking link

How to run a successful TEDx (this is a must read from TEDxSanDiego)

In the spirit of sharing, here are a few of my thoughts on why the day was so successful, from my perspective as director of the show. I hope they help you in planning for your TEDx: We treated TEDxSanDiego as a show, not an event. It became apparent early on that our TEDx was going to grow beyond just a few people getting together to watch a speaker or two. Our curator and co-founders put together a fantastic vision for the day, and I was lucky enough to execute that. Once we saw how big it was, there was a conscious decision to treat this as a show, not just an event, and that came through in the production quality and execution. We used confidence monitors, had countdown clocks, put together a production staff that included a show director, tech director, stage manager, presentation manager, etc. Also, having worked on the Oscars and Emmys, I know a good show is a well-timed show, which brings me to... Create - and follow - a show rundown. In the beginning, the curator and co-founders created an spectacular agenda for the day. When I came on board about 10 weeks before the show, I took that outline and flowed it into a minute by minute rundown (based on a format used in my TV and sports days). Not only did we start on time, but we were actually running 5 minutes ahead at a few points. Our breaks started and ended right on time, and the show itself ended exactly when it was supposed to. It's because we had everything scheduled to the minute. Each line on our rundown includes segment time, cumulative time, activity, speaker, script, PA activities, and audio/visual notes. (I posted the template here if you would like to use it.) Create a single point of contact for the show schedule. The key to the rundown working: 1 person owns it. (Ideally, whoever's calling the show.) Any updates go through said owner, which cuts down on churn and dramatically decreases the chances of anything getting lost. Another key? Lock it down at 5 p.m. the day before rehearsal. Tell folks if they have any updates after that point, they must print them out and bring you a copy. This is good for 2 reasons: 1., you get to go to bed at a decent hour (instead of people emailing you at 3 a.m. to say, "Please update to include my changes.") and 2. ensures no one shows up at rehearsal and says, "Oh, well I sent that to you." Have a tech rehearsal. The day before the show, we had a full cue to cue tech rehearsal. We started off with our tech load in, then marked all our speaker spots on stage, followed by our emcees running their lines. Speakers began showing up in the afternoon, some running their full talk, others just clicking through and getting a feel for the stage and the venue. Get the speakers on the same stage...er, page. At the end of tech rehearsal, we had a formal Speaker Orientation, and went over a couple of high-level points. The biggest was timing. The best advice (which came courtesy of our Tech Director) was this: "Hey guys, the best reason to stay on time and respect the countdown clock? That's the only way you'll get on potentially TED.com - they don't post talks that go over." (Whether or not that's true...it proved to be motivation enough: only 1 out of 22 went over.) We also showed them what a proper emcee to speaker (and vice versa) handoff looked like: emcee stands center stage and waits for speaker to get all the way to them before shaking hands and walking offstage. Same for when the speaker's done talking: wait in the middle of the stage for the emcee. It not only cements connection, but it's good for the audience to see that handoff. Now about speaker timing... Have a plan for speakers who go over their time. Finally, we showed with the speakers how we were going to handle it if they went over their allotted time. I stood on stage acting as the speaker, and the emcee did her part. We told them at 0:30 over, the emcee walks onto the stage and stands down stage left (to give them a peripheral visual cue). At 1:00, the emcee walks toward them and kindly says something witty, such as, "We could listen to you all day..." All the speakers agreed it was a fair, elegant solution and it worked out well for us. Stay on time. When I say we had things timed down to the second, I wasn't kidding. The beauty of having a timed rundown was we always knew where we stood. If things were running a minute behind, I could easily have the emcee cut out a follow-up question. If we had a little extra time, we started the breaks a little early, giving folks more time to mingle and connect. Use the pre-recorded TED talks to come out of break. This one was key. Knowing we had a big venue, I didn't want there to be too much shuffling of folks getting back into their seats while the speakers were talking. So we gave a 5 minute VO warning over the PA system (accompanied by the onscreen PowerPoint counting down from 5 minutes left until 1 minute left). Then we came out of the break with the emcee introducing a pre-recorded TED talk. That worked out well, because by the time the speaker hit the stage everyone was comfortably seated, relaxed, focused, and ready to listen. And speaking of the required 25% TED talks... Be choiceful in your TED talks. As for the order of pre-recorded TED talks, we showed the longest TED talk (18 min.) early in the day, and they got shorter as the day (and people's attention spans) went on. So it was 18 min. > 9 min. > 9 min. > 6 min. Also, if you do follow our Break > TED talk > Speaker format, be aware of which talk you show after lunch -- people are going to be in a food coma, so I recommend showing a funny/inspirational one. Our two 9 minute talks were Annie Lennox and Adora Svitak; Annie's talk is heavy and not a great post-lunch talk. We ran Adora Svitak's talk, and it worked like a charm. Annie's talk was after the first afternoon break, and worked well. Sebastian Wernicke's talk was after the last break, and got everyone in a great mood for the last part of the day. Your show's only as good as the team that works on it. Lucky for us, we had a fantastic team. From the founders (we referred to them as Executive Producers, even if they followed the more PC TED terms of curator :) all the time) to the show day staff, each and every person was committed and passionate. We were very lucky in that we also had the privilege of working with the Sharp Healthcare event experience team. They helped elevate us from a good show to a great one. (And their answer to every question was, "Yes." Finally, don't just take our word for it. Here's the Twitter stream (hashtag #TEDxSD), which  has a lot of beautiful, positive commentary: http://twitter.com/search?q=%23TEDxSD Of all the shows I've worked on, and events I've produced, TEDxSanDiego is by far my favorite. If I may...my two favorite quotes about the day, from the speakers: "This feels like a real, actual TED show." - Overheard backstage after the first break "I've never seen a show run so tightly on time. Kudos. I'd work with you again in a heartbeat." - Tom Yelllin, former ABC News and biz partner of Peter Jennings I adore each and every person who I had the luck of working with on TEDxSanDiego, and miss them already. I woke up the next day with a smile on my face, and almost a week later, it's still there. Never underestimate the power of a small group of people with a big vision. That's all I've got for now. If you have any questions, comments, or sarcastic remarks, please don't hesitate to contact me. :) Cheers, Kara DeFrias, M.Ed. TEDxSanDiego Show Director c 858.603.3625 events  | c 215.262.1111 personal | t @californiakara w http://www.californiakara.com | http://www.linkedin.com/in/defrias  

TEDx Documents

TEDx Toolkit

TEDx Sponsorship Guideline

TEDx Branding Guidelines

TEDx Basic Guidelines

How to give the "Perfect TED Talk"