Foundations of Education

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
Rocket clouds
Foundations of Education by Mind Map: Foundations of Education

1. Politics of Education (Chapter 2)

1.1. 1. LIBERALS

1.2. 2. John Dewey

1.3. 3. Role of the School

1.4. 4. The liberals perspective of educational problems.

1.5. 5. Liberals views on Educational Policy and Reform

1.6. 6. PROGRESSIVISM

2. History of U.S. Education (Chapter 3)

2.1. 1. Reform Movement

2.1.1. 2. Horace Mann

2.2. 3. Opposition to Public Education

2.3. INFLUENTIAL REFORM MOVEMENT

2.4. 4. Education for Women

2.5. 5. Education for African-Americans

2.6. 6. Historical interpretation of U.S. Education (The Democratic-Liberal School)

3. Sociological Perspective (Chapter 4)

3.1. THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVE

3.2. 1. Functional Theories

3.3. 2. Conflict Theories

3.4. 3. Interactional Theories

3.5. EFFECTS OF SCHOOL ON INDIVIDUALS

3.6. 4. Knowledge and Attitudes

3.7. 5. Employment

3.8. 6. Education and Mobility

4. Philosophy of Education (Chapter 5)

4.1. PRAGMATISM

4.2. 1. Generic Notions

4.3. 2. Key Researchers

4.3.1. George Sanders Peirce and William James

4.3.2. Francis Bacon

4.3.3. John Locke

4.3.4. Jean-Jacques Rousseau

4.3.5. John Dewey

4.4. 3. Goals of Education

4.5. 4. Role of the Teacher

4.6. 5. The Method of Instruction

4.7. 6. Curriculum

5. Schools are Organizations (Chapter 6)

5.1. Stakeholders

5.1.1. 1. Senators

5.1.1.1. 2. House of Reprresentative

5.1.1.2. 3.State Superintendent

5.1.1.3. 4. Representative on State School Board

5.1.1.4. 5. Local School Superintendent

5.1.1.5. 6. Comparison of another Country's education system

6. Curriculum and Pedagogy (Chapter 7)

6.1. HISTORICAL CURRICULUM

6.1.1. Developmentalist Curriculum

6.1.1.1. 1. This is related to the needs and interest of the student rather than the need of society.

6.1.1.2. 2. Stress the importance of being flexible in what is being taught and how it is being taught

6.1.1.3. 3. Romantic Progressivism

6.2. SOCIAL CURRICULUM

6.2.1. Functionalist

6.2.1.1. 4. School Curriculum

6.2.1.2. 5. Role of the Curriculum

6.2.1.3. 6.  Emile Durkheim

6.2.1.4. 7. Values for a Modern Soceity

7. Equality of Opportunity (Chapter 8)

7.1. AFRICAN AMERICANS

7.1.1. 1. Abbott v. Burke

7.1.2. 2. Attainment

7.1.3. 3. Drop-out rate for African Americans

7.2. COLEMAN STUDY

7.2.1. 1. Round 1 of the Coleman Study (1966)

7.2.2. 2. Round 2 of the Coleman Study (1982)

7.2.3. 3. Round 3 of the Coleman Study

8. Educational Inequality (Chapter 9)

8.1. SOCIOLOGICAL EXPLANATION OF UNEQUAL ACHIEVEMENT

8.1.1. Genetic Differences

8.1.1.1. 1. Limited Views

8.1.1.2. 2. Mental Illness

8.1.1.3. 3. Arthur Jensen

8.1.2. School Centered Explanation

8.1.2.1. 1. School Financing

8.1.2.2. 2. Gender and Schooling

8.1.2.3. 3. Between-School Differences: Curriculum and Pedagogic Practices

9. Educational Reform

9.1. School-to-Work Program

9.1.1. 1. School Based Learning

9.1.2. 2. Work-Based Learning

9.1.3. 3. Connecting Activities

9.2. Community Reform

9.2.1. 4. Full Service

9.2.2. 5. Newark's Broader Bolder Approach

9.2.3. 6. Canada's Harlem Children's Zone