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Designing Your Life by Mind Map: Designing Your Life
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Designing Your Life

The course incorporates an introduction to design thinking, which we then apply via a framework that organizes the content elements of the course.  The framework addresses the integration of work and worldview, the realities of engaging the workplace, and practices that support vocation formation throughout your life. The course deals with issues ranging from how to find andexperience meaning-making in work to how to network and get an interview. The course will include seminar-style discussions, role-playing, short writing assignments, guest speakers, and individual mentoring and coaching. Small group dialogue will be held in regular section groups which will form during the first week and will meet during class time.  The capstone assignment is the creation of an “Odyssey Years Plan” focusing on taking action in the 3-5 years following your Stanford graduation. All content copywrite Designing Your Life

The Class

How's it Going - Life Design Assessment

Taking Stock in 4 Areas, Health, Mind, Body, Spirit, Work, Getting paid or not, Doesn't matter, Play, Any activity that brings you joy, Love, We know what it is & it flows in many directions

The Assessment & The HWPL Dashboard

Activities, 1. Write a few sentences about how it’s going in each of the four areas., 2. Mark where you are (0 to Full) on each gauge., 3. Ask yourself if there’s a design problem you’d like to tackle in any of these areas., 4. Now ask yourself if your “problem” is a gravity problem.”

What is Your Quest?

“ship) trying to figure out what to do next. It’s as if life were this great big DIY project, but only a select few actually got the instruction manual. This is not designing your life. This is obsessing about your life. We’re here to change that. And the questions we’re ultimately asking are the same ones the Greeks started asking in the fifth century b.c. and we’ve all been asking ever since: What is the good life? How do you define it? How do you live it? Throughout the ages, people have been asking the same questions: Why am I here? What am I doing? Why does it matter? What is my purpose? What’s the point of it all?” Excerpt From: Bill Burnett & Dave Evans. “Designing Your Life.” iBooks. https://itun.es/us/FAiAbb.l

The Classic Questions of the Ages, Why am I here?, What am I doing?, Why does it matter?, What is my purpose?, What’s the point of it all?

Building Your Compass, Workview, What is work for you?, Why do you do it?, Lifeview, What gives life meaning?, What makes your life worthwhile or valuable?, Two Views, The views don't have to imitate others, Finding your own authenticity, Finding coherency

Activities, Workview Reflection, Address these questions:, Why work?, What is work for?, What does work mean?, How does work relate to the individual, others, society?, What defines good or worthwhile work?, What does money have to do with it?, What do experience, growth, and fulfillment have to do with it?”, Lifeview Reflection, Address these questions:, Why are we here?, What is the meaning or purpose of life?, What is the relationship between the individual and others?, Where do family, country, and the rest of the world fit in?, What is good, and what is evil?, Is there a higher power, God, or something transcendent, and if so, what impact does this have on your life?, What is the role of joy, sorrow, justice, injustice, love, peace, and strife in life?”, The Venn Coherency Connection Between Workview & Lifeview, What is common between the your Workview & Lifeview?, Activity, a. Where do your views on work and life complement one another?, b. Where do they clash?, c. Does one drive the other? How?

True North on the Compass, Re-Calibrate when necessary when veering off course

Wayfinding, Engagement, Flow is Total Engagement, Flow is Play in Your Dashboard, A state of being where time stands still, Origin, When you are in FLOW you are:, Experiencing complete involvement in the activity., Feeling a sense of ecstasy or euphoria., Having great inner clarity—knowing just what to do and how to do it., Being totally calm and at peace., Feeling as if time were standing still—or disappearing in an instant., Energy, Brain Energy, Physical Energy, Finding the Purpose, The Good Time Journal, Written Tracking, Activity Log (where I record where I’m engaged and energized), Draw gauges if you want, Drill down to the particulars of the day, For 3 Weeks, Reflections (where I discover what I am learning), “Noticing trends, insights, surprises—anything that is a clue to what does and doesn’t work for you.”, Reflect Each Week, AEIOU, Activities, What were you actually doing?, Environments, How did the environment make you feel?, Interactions, Were you interacting with machines or humans?, Objects, What were the objects - computers, tools, paper and pencil?, Users, Who else was there?, A Sample, A Sample, Use this as a driver to discover, Work is Fun, When you are actually leaning into your strengths and are deeply engaged and energized by what you’re doing., Crafting the Good from the Bad & funneling your life into the Good Aspects, Getting Unstuck, Mindmapping, "Need we say more?", Pose a Large Question, “How do you think social innovation can be a part of our college, and where would we start?”

Odyssey Plans, 3 Alternatives to What You Have Planned, For the next 5 years of your life, Life #1, What your actual plan is to do, Each must include a timeline, A title for each in a six word headline, Questions that this alternative is asking., A Performance Gauge, Performance Gauge, Resources, “Do you have the objective resources—time, money, skill, contacts—you need to pull off your plan?”, Likeability, “(Are you hot or cold or warm about your plan?)”, Confidence, “(Are you feeling full of confidence, or pretty uncertain about pulling this off?)”, Coherence, “(Does the plan make sense within itself? And is it consistent with you, your Workview, and your Lifeview?), Considerations, “Geography—where will you live?, ° What experience/learning will you gain?, ° What are the impacts/results of choosing this alternative?, ° What will life look like? What particular role, industry, or company do you see yourself in?, Samples, Sample #1, Sample #2, Sample #3, Blank page, Life #2, What you would do if #1 was gone, Each must include a timeline, A title for each in a six word headline, Questions that this alternative is asking., A Performance Gauge, Performance Gauge, Resources, “Do you have the objective resources—time, money, skill, contacts—you need to pull off your plan?”, Likeability, “(Are you hot or cold or warm about your plan?)”, Confidence, “(Are you feeling full of confidence, or pretty uncertain about pulling this off?)”, Coherence, “(Does the plan make sense within itself? And is it consistent with you, your Workview, and your Lifeview?), Considerations, “Geography—where will you live?, ° What experience/learning will you gain?, ° What are the impacts/results of choosing this alternative?, ° What will life look like? What particular role, industry, or company do you see yourself in?, Samples, Sample #1, Sample #2, Sample #3, Blank page, Life #3, The thing you would do if money were no object, Each must include a timeline, A title for each in a six word headline, Questions that this alternative is asking., A Performance Gauge, Performance Gauge, Resources, “Do you have the objective resources—time, money, skill, contacts—you need to pull off your plan?”, Likeability, “(Are you hot or cold or warm about your plan?)”, Confidence, “(Are you feeling full of confidence, or pretty uncertain about pulling this off?)”, Coherence, “(Does the plan make sense within itself? And is it consistent with you, your Workview, and your Lifeview?), Considerations, “Geography—where will you live?, ° What experience/learning will you gain?, ° What are the impacts/results of choosing this alternative?, ° What will life look like? What particular role, industry, or company do you see yourself in?, Samples, Sample #1, Sample #2, Sample #3, Blank page, A Performance Gauge, Performance Gauge, Resources, “Do you have the objective resources—time, money, skill, contacts—you need to pull off your plan?”, Likeability, “(Are you hot or cold or warm about your plan?)”, Confidence, “(Are you feeling full of confidence, or pretty uncertain about pulling this off?)”, Coherence, “(Does the plan make sense within itself? And is it consistent with you, your Workview, and your Lifeview?), Considerations, “Geography—where will you live?, ° What experience/learning will you gain?, ° What are the impacts/results of choosing this alternative?, ° What will life look like? What particular role, industry, or company do you see yourself in?, Samples, Sample #1, Sample #2, Sample #3, Blank page, Start with multiple plans in parallel, Most likely not to be influenced or only committed to one plan., Odyssey Plans are Sketches of Possibilities, Odyssey Plans sometimes unveil dreams or rekindle forgotten dreams, Prototyping, “When you are trying to solve a problem, any problem, you typically start with what you know about the problem: you start with the data. You need enough data so that you can understand what causes what, and what is likely to happen when something else happens.”, “Prototypes should be designed to ask a question and get some data about something that you’re interested in., "Good prototypes isolate one aspect of a problem and design an experience that allows you to “try out” some version of a potentially interesting future.”, “The simplest and easiest form of prototyping is a conversation”, Life Design Interview, Brainstorming, “A method of generating ideas that relied on two rules: generating a large quantity of ideas without concern for quality, and deferring judgment so that participants would not censor ideas.", 4 Steps, Framing a Good Question, Warming Up, The Brainstorm Itself, 1. Go for quantity, not quality., 2. Defer judgment and do not censor ideas., 3. Build off the ideas of others., 4. Encourage wild ideas., Naming and Framing the Outcomes

Choosing Happiness, The Life Design Choosing Process, Gather and Create Options, Narrow Down the List, Choose Discerningly, Let Go & Move On, Letting Go by Grabbing On, Failure Immunity, There is no such thing, No one is immune to failure, “Dysfunctional Belief: We judge our life by the outcome., Reframe: Life is a process, not an outcome.”, Being & Doing, “Dysfunctional Belief: Life is a finite game, with winners and losers., Reframe: Life is an infinite game, with no winners or losers.”, “Winning and Losing and Winning”, Failure Reframe Exercise, 1. Log your failures., 2. Categorize your failures., 3. Identify growth insights., Categorize Your Failures, Screw-Ups, Weaknesses, Growth Opportunities, Identify Growth Insights, Chart, Don’t Fight Reality, Life Designers don't fight reality, Building a Team, Dysfunctional Belief: It’s my life, I have to design it myself., Reframe: You live and design your life in collaboration with others., “When you design your life, you are engaging in an act of co-creation.”, Identifying Your Team, Supporters, Players, Intimates, The Team, Team Roles & Rules, 1. Respectful, 2. Confidential, 3. Participative (no holding back), 4. Generative (constructive, not skeptical or judging), Calling All Mentors, Counsel and Advice, Discernment, “The Long View and the Local View”, Beyond Team to Community, Kindred Purpose, Meets Regularly, Shared Ground, To Know & Be Known, Activity, Building a Team, 1. Make a list of three to five people who might be a part of your Life Design Team. Think of your supporters, your intimates, your mentors or possible mentors. Ideally, these will be three to five people also actively engaged in designing their lives., 2. Make sure everyone has a copy of the book (or buy books for everyone), so all the members of your team understand how life design works and have reviewed the team roles and rules., 3. Agree to meet regularly and actively to co-create a well-designed life as a community.”

Conclusion, A Well Designed Life, “Dysfunctional Belief: I finished designing my life; the hard work is done, and everything will be great., Reframe: You never finish designing your life—life is a joyous and never-ending design project of building your way forward.”, “Balance happens over time., "Life design happens over time.”, 5 Principles, Curious, “What would someone who’s interested in this want to know?, How does it work?, Why do they do it that way?, How did they used to do it?, What do experts in this field argue about and why?, What’s the most interesting thing going on here?, What don’t I get about what’s happening here?, How could I find out?”, Try Stuff, “How can we try this before the day is out?, What would we like to know more about?, What can I do that will answer that?, What sorts of things are actionable, and if we tried them, what might we learn?”, Reframe Problems, “What perspective do I actually have?, Where am I now coming from?, What other perspectives could other people have? Name them, and then describe the problem from their perspective, not yours.”, Awareness of the Process, “What are all the steps behind you and in front of you that you can imagine?, Is what’s on your mind actually germane to the step you’re on now?, Are you on the right step, or are you ahead of or behind yourself?, What happens if you don’t think more than one step ahead?, What’s the worst thing that can happen? How likely is it to happen, and what would you do if it did?, What’s the best thing that can happen?”, Ask for Help, “Build a team., Create a community., Who are all the different groups and constituencies involved in what you’re working on? Are you connected to and in conversation with all of them? If not—get going., Keep an ask-for-help journal in which you jot down the questions you want help on, and keep it handy. Each week, identify some people who can help you with some of the journal entries and reach out to them. Journal answers and results from your helpers., Find a mentor., Call your mother (she’d love it—you know she would).”, Just Two More Things, Your Compass, When we talk to our students two, three, five, or more years after they’ve graduated and left our class, they say that their compass is one of the exercises they keep coming back to., “They determine if you’re living a coherent life in which you’ve got who you are, what you believe, and what you’re doing in adequate alignment.”, Your Practices, “Life design is ultimately a way of life that will transform how you look at your life and how you live your life. The end result of a well-designed life is a life well lived., "And, really, is there anything more we could hope for?”

Related Items

Standards

Actual Class at Stanford.

Media

NYT Article

Fast Company Article

Good Time Journal Template

Personal Mindmap Template Plus

Designing Your Life Worksheets

Discussion Questions

Questions #1

“1.   Did you perform all the exercises in the book? Which ones did you find most thought provoking?

2.   In the introduction, the authors point out that only 27 percent of college graduates have a career related to their majors. What did you think when you read that statistic? Are you among the 27 percent?

3.   The concept of “reframing”—pivoting your perspective to address a perceived problem—plays an important role in this book. What experiences have you had with reframing, either in your career or in your personal life?

4.   When discussing the role of a designer, the authors say, “Designers don’t think their way forward. Designers build their way forward” (this page). Until you read this book, had you been mostly thinking or mostly building?”

“5.   On this page, the authors write, “Designing something changes the future that is possible.” What does this mean to you?

6.   Which was a greater challenge while building your compass: describing your Workview or describing your Lifeview?

7.   The authors say that the process of reconciling Workview and Lifeview often leads to the biggest “aha” moments (this page). What became clear to you?

8.   Have you ever experienced “flow,” the feeling of complete engage-ment? If so, when?

9.   On this page, the authors write, “There is no one idea for your life. There are many lives you could live happily and productively.” Have you ever thought this way before? How many lives did you imagine for yourself while reading this book? What was the most surprising connection you made in your mind map?”

Questions #2

“10. When you created your Odyssey Plans, which one set your heart to racing? Was it a new discovery for you?

11. Are you discussing this book with your Life Design Team? If you haven’t assembled one yet, what’s stopping you?

12. Chapter 6 is devoted to prototyping: asking questions, uncovering hidden biases, iterating rapidly, and creating momentum. Were you familiar with this concept before reading the book? What aspects of your life have you prototyped?

13. Did you hold a brainstorming session? What was your most successful question? How many ideas did you generate?

14. What is the difference between pursuing a job and pursuing an offer? In your own life, which do you generally do?

“15. On this page, the authors talk about “pursuing latent wonderfulness.” How would you define that concept?

16. What did you learn from the jam study described on this page?

17. The notion of failure as a useful thing comes up frequently in the book, and particular in. In your own life, how have you “failed forward”?

18. Until now, have you received more advice (when someone is telling you what they think) when making a decision, or more counsel (when someone is trying to help you figure out what you think)? Which has proved more helpful?

19. What was your biggest revelation from this book?

20. If the authors were in this room right now and asked you, “How’s it going?” how would you respond?”

Brene Brown Ted Talk

Brene Brown: The Power of Vulnerability

Numb, We are numb, We can't selectively numb areas of our life without taking out everything else as well., Joy & Everything Else is Numbed too

Children, Hardwired for struggle, Worthy of love & belonging, Resilient, Be authentic with children, They will appreciate it

We Pretend, What we do doesn't affect others

Authentic & Real, Bringing out the honest

Let ourselves be seen, Love with everything, Practice gratitude & joy, Believe that we are "enough"