Physics (Quarter 2)

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Physics (Quarter 2) by Mind Map: Physics (Quarter 2)

1. Friction

1.1. the resistance that one surface or object encounters when moving over another.

1.2. F = Mn

1.2.1. Friction = (coefficient of friction)(normal force)

1.3. Friction

2. Resultants

2.1. The resultant is the vector sum of two or more vectors. It is the result of adding two or more vectors together.

2.2. Tail-to-Head method

2.2.1. More than 2 vectors

2.2.2. end of arrow-end of arrow

2.3. Parallelogram method

2.3.1. 2 vectors

2.3.2. end to end/ head to head

2.3.3. draw a parallelogram and connect the corners. Measure angle and length

3. Speed & Velocity

3.1. Speed and Velocity are very similar but speed is scalar and velocity is a vector

3.1.1. Velocity has a direction and a magnitude

3.1.2. Speed has only magnitude

3.2. Speed is to Velocity as Distance is to Displacement

4. Tension

4.1. Stretching Force

4.1.1. The tension force is the force that is transmitted through a string, rope, cable or wire when it is pulled tight by forces acting from opposite ends.

4.1.2. The tension force is directed along the length of the wire and pulls equally on the objects on the opposite ends of the wire.

4.2. Tension

5. Net Force

5.1. The combination of all forces acting on an object

5.2. The net force on an object changes its motion

5.3. Net Force

6. Force

7. Vector & Scalar

7.1. A vector is an arrow that represents the magnitude and direction of a quantity.

7.1.1. Magnitude = amount/length

7.1.2. To be a vector it must have both magnitude and direction.

7.1.3. Spacial Direction

7.1.4. Location doesn't matter with vectors

7.1.5. Examples of Vectors

7.1.5.1. Gravity

7.1.5.2. Force

7.1.5.3. Acceleration

7.1.5.4. Friction

7.1.5.5. (Magnetic) Fields

7.1.5.6. Displacement

7.1.5.7. Velocity

7.2. Scalar

7.2.1. a scalar quantity is a quantity that has magnitude only, but no direction

7.2.2. Examples of Scalars

7.2.2.1. Money

7.2.2.2. Food

7.2.2.3. Volume

7.2.2.4. Mass

7.2.2.5. Time

7.2.2.6. Counted Things

7.2.2.7. Energy

7.2.2.8. Temperature

7.2.2.9. Distance

7.2.2.10. Speed

7.3. Vector & Scalar

7.3.1. A vector is an arrow that represents the magnitude and direction of a quantity.

7.3.1.1. Magnitude = amount/length

7.3.1.2. To be a vector it must have both magnitude and direction.

7.3.1.3. Spacial Direction

7.3.1.4. Location doesn't matter with vectors

7.3.1.5. Examples of Vectors

7.3.1.5.1. Gravity

7.3.1.5.2. Force

7.3.1.5.3. Acceleration

7.3.1.5.4. Friction

7.3.1.5.5. (Magnetic) Fields

7.3.1.5.6. Displacement

7.3.1.5.7. Velocity

7.3.2. Scalar

7.3.2.1. a scalar quantity is a quantity that has magnitude only, but no direction

7.3.2.2. Examples of Scalars

7.3.2.2.1. Money

7.3.2.2.2. Food

7.3.2.2.3. Volume

7.3.2.2.4. Mass

7.3.2.2.5. Time

7.3.2.2.6. Counted Things

7.3.2.2.7. Energy

7.3.2.2.8. Temperature

7.3.2.2.9. Distance

7.3.2.2.10. Speed

8. Diagrams

8.1. Force Identification Diagram

8.2. A diagram showing all the forces acting on an object, the force's direction and its magnitude.

8.3. It is a simplification of the picture/problem that shows just the forces

8.4. Force Identification Diagram

8.5. Free Body Diagram

8.6. Free-body diagrams are diagrams used to show the relative magnitude and direction of all forces acting upon an object in a given situation.

8.7. Free Body Diagram

9. Force

9.1. Push/Pull

9.1.1. A force of some kind is always required to change the state of motion of an object.

9.2. Mass

9.2.1. Amount of stuff/matter in an object

9.3. Volume

9.3.1. How much space an object takes up

9.4. Density

9.4.1. Amount of mass in the volume of an object

9.4.2. Mass / Volume

9.5. Gravity

9.5.1. Pull of gravity on mass

10. Equilibrium

10.1. A state wherein no physical changes occur; it is a state of steadiness

10.2. Sum of F = 0

10.3. Dynamic Equilibrium

10.3.1. Constant Motion (no acceleration/deceleration)

10.4. Static Equilibrium

10.4.1. Not moving - no forces acting on it.

10.5. Greek Sigma "The sum of"

11. Torque

11.1. Twisting/Rotating Force

11.1.1. Torque is a measure of how much a force acting on an object causes that object to rotate.

11.1.2. Force X Distance

11.1.3. Tnet

11.2. Torque

12. Electrical

12.1. Electro-Motive-Force

12.1.1. Force that moves/pushes electrons

12.1.2. Vnet = IR

12.1.2.1. Volts = Resistance (ohm) Current (amps)

12.1.3. Watts = Power

12.1.4. Battery

12.1.5. Resistor

12.1.6. Switch

13. Science

13.1. Science is the process of observation to answer questions.

13.1.1. Study

13.1.2. Knowledge

13.1.3. Theories

13.1.4. Hypothesis

13.1.5. Experiment

13.1.6. Hypothesis

13.1.6.1. Theory

13.1.6.1.1. Cannot be proven WRONG

13.1.6.2. Law/Fact

13.1.6.2.1. are changeable

13.2. Scientific Method

13.2.1. Hypothesis

13.2.2. Experiment & Observe

13.2.2.1. 5 senses

13.2.3. Review

13.2.4. Conclude

13.3. Technology = Science

13.3.1. Technology amplifies senses

13.4. Art, Science & Religion set us apart from animals

13.5. Science = How

13.6. Science does not = Why

13.7. Religion = Why

13.8. Religion does not = How

14. Aristotle

14.1. Observations > Think > conclusion

14.2. Brilliant guy, but didn't do science

15. Newton's 1st Law

15.1. Newton's First Law states that an object will remain at rest or in uniform motion in a straight line unless acted upon by an external force.

15.1.1. "Law of Inertia"

15.1.2. Inertia

15.1.2.1. "object's laziness"

15.1.2.2. Object's ability to resist changes in its motion

15.2. Objects at rest stay at rest

15.3. Objects in motion stay in motion at a constant velocity

15.4. Unless acted upon by an outside force

15.5. Motion

15.5.1. Natural Motion

15.5.2. Natural motion

15.5.2.1. Earth, Water, Air, Fire & Aether

15.5.2.2. The vertical motion an object will do to get back to its "layer

15.5.2.3. No Force Required

15.5.3. Violent

15.5.3.1. Motion that removes an object from where it is "comfortable"

15.5.3.2. Force is required

15.5.4. Being at rest is ideal

16. Universe Models & Gallileo

16.1. Thinkers

16.1.1. Aristotle

16.1.2. Ptolemy

16.1.3. Geocentric - "Earth-Centered"

16.2. Scientists

16.2.1. Copernicus

16.2.2. Galileo

16.2.3. Heliocentric - "Sun-Centered"

16.3. Galileo

16.3.1. Proved the heliocentric model correct

16.3.2. Wrote, "Dialogue concerning the 2 chief world systems."

16.3.3. 1564-1642

16.3.4. Proved objects fall at the same rate

16.3.5. "Father of Modern Science"