Colour Space & White Balance

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
Rocket clouds
Colour Space & White Balance by Mind Map: Colour Space & White Balance

1. White Balance Photoshoot Settings

1.1. FSTOP / F5.6

1.2. Preset and custom white balance

1.3. Shutter speed / 1/13

1.4. ISO / 400

2. Colour Space Bit Depth

2.1. Bit Calculations

2.2. Bit Depth Explination

2.3. The number of colours which can be stored within each pixel.

2.4. The most commonly used bit depths are 1-bit, 4-bit, 8-bit and 24-bit and by using the 2n formula the number of colours for each level of bit depth can be calculated.

3. White Balance Photo examples

3.1. AWB - N/A

3.1.1. Daylight - 5200K

3.1.1.1. Shade - 7000K

3.1.1.1.1. Clarity - 6000K

3.2. Kelvin colour scale

4. What is colour space?

4.1. The colour space is used to represent what a device and human can perceive.

4.2. A colour space is a specific range of colours also known as a gamut.

4.3. RGB, AdobeRGB, ProPhoto, CMYK & L*a*b* are all types of colour spaces. RGB is the simplest, AdobeRGB is used for editing. ProPhoto is the largest and used for more high quality images, CMYK is for printing and L*a*b* is the space that can perceive all colours.

5. Custom White Balance: Photos

5.1. yellow

5.1.1. yellow photo

5.2. grey- blue

5.2.1. grey-blue photo

5.3. orange

5.3.1. orange photo

5.4. blue

5.4.1. blue photo

6. What is logo-rhythmic and linear?

6.1. Change in the colour value should remain constant and produce the same change.

6.2. Change in the settings should not remain constant and not produce the same change.

7. What other ways can you deal with white balance other than the camera’s automatic settings?

7.1. You can also adjust white balance manually by setting a white object as a reference point. This is used to help guide the camera on how white other objects would look in a particular shot, so it will use this colour setting until the next white balance is performed. It is useful to manually adjust the WB when taking a picture to compensate for the changing light conditions that will happen during the day.

7.2. Camera Settings

8. What is white balance?

8.1. White Balance

8.2. Why is white balance important?

8.2.1. Our eyes are very good at judging what is white under different light sources but digital cameras can often have great difficulty with auto white balance (AWB) so they can sometimes create unsightly blue, orange, or even green colour casts. Therefore white balance is important as it can help get rid of these colour casts, making the image look more natural and creating an overall better finish.

8.2.2. White balance (WB) is the process of removing unrealistic colour casts, so that objects which appear white in person are rendered white in your photo. Put simply White Balance is the process used in order to get the same white in the photo compared to what you had seen in real life when the picture was taken.

8.3. What is the unit of measurement for colour temperature?

8.3.1. Colour temperature is usually expressed in Kelvin (K), a unit of measurement for temperature based on the Kelvin scale. We measure the hue (colour shade) of the light as a temperature thanks to British physicist William Kelvin. William Kelvin heated a block of carbon which glowed in the heat, producing a range of different colours at different temperatures. The arrangement of colours is due to the fact that when the block of carbon was heated at a low temperature, it glowed a dim red. As the temperature increased the colour changed according to the chart below.

8.3.1.1. Colour Temperature diagrams

8.4. How might you use neutral reference to set a custom white balance?

8.4.1. The neutral reference that photographers most commonly use to set a common white balance is a white/grey/ white and grey card. The card is designed to help photographers adjust their exposure and white balance settings consistently by providing a reliable reference point. This reference point will set a white balance point for a particular image set in order to get an accurate, realistic custom white balance.

8.4.2. Neutral reference to set custom white balance

8.5. To measure your reference point, place the card in the area or scene in which you intend to take a photograph with the grey side facing toward the camera. For the most accurate results, place the card directly where your subject might stand or rest so that it reflects the light source. Most high end cameras have a setting that allows you to set your White Balance to match the closest lighting type. Afterwards you just take the picture and the camera will adjust the white balance according to the card. This gives you the correct colours for your picture.

9. What is colour temperature?

9.1. How might choosing the white balance and/or specific colour temperatures affect the emotional impact of an image?

9.1.1. Movies have long been using color grading to add emotional effects to certain scenes.  Horror movies sometimes apply blue casts to create a “chilling” effect. Likewise, films that involve the grittier aspects of reality, desolation, or dystopian themes are frequently desaturated and washed out, removing most of the bright colors we associate with joy and life.

9.1.1.1. Yellow Yellow is, psychologically, the happiest color. It’s also the loudest, and is associated with extroversion. It’s the color of the sun, so naturally, it’s used by people who want to be seen.

9.1.1.2. Red Red is the most visceral colour, seeing as how it’s literally the colour of viscera, and the one that perhaps draws the strongest physical reaction from us. It is the colour of life, of blood, and warmth. It’s also the colour of violence, of romance, and of dominance, and our minds are hard wired to associate it with those things

9.1.1.3. Blue Blue is the ultimate "cool" color. Dark and medium shades are considered calming, where its lighter shades are often chilly or icy. It can be used to create a feeling of sadness and aloofness, or of relaxation and quiet reflection.

9.2. What is the unit of measurement for colour temperature?

9.2.1. Colour temperature is usually expressed in Kelvin (K), a unit of measurement for temperature based on the Kelvin scale. We measure the hue (colour shade) of the light as a temperature thanks to British physicist William Kelvin. William Kelvin heated a block of carbon which glowed in the heat, producing a range of different colours at different temperatures. The arrangement of colours is due to the fact

9.3. Colour temperature is typically recorded in kelvin, the unit of absolute temperature. Cool colours like blue and white generally have colour temperatures over 7000K, while warmer colours like red and orange lie around the 2000K mark.

9.3.1. What is colour temperature?