At a time of constrained resources – where should the research priorities of the CAL community be...

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At a time of constrained resources – where should the research priorities of the CAL community be if we want to promote social justice? Collaborative knowledge creation at CAL11 by Mind Map: At a time of constrained resources – where should the research priorities of the CAL community be if we want to promote social     justice?             Collaborative knowledge creation at CAL11

1. Increasing exposure to different political systems and the ways in which they operate

2. Supporting the case for women using ICTs

3. Reducing the digital divide

4. The commercialism of learning artefacts

5. Impacting on the indigenous culture

6. Digital safety issues

7. Rural and urban challenges

8. Improving job opportunities

9. Changing pedagogies and/or reinforcing information transmission

10. What are the CAL community priorities?

10.1. Privacy

10.2. New ways about valuing things

10.3. Futures for teacher education

10.4. Fragmentation of Education Technologies

10.5. methods and methodology

10.6. Play programming

10.7. Rethinking the digital divide

10.8. The fragmentation of the research community

10.8.1. People and projects are in silos.

10.9. Social and political issues

10.10. New node

11. Which projects take account of constrained resources?

12. Who is working in the field at CAL11?

12.1. Ros Sutherland

12.2. Keri Facer

12.3. Lindsey Grant

12.4. Bozena Mannova

12.5. Jolly Rubagiza

12.6. Alphonse Uworwabayeho

12.7. Christine Plesh

13. Dear knowledge creators, feel free to add and move nodes as the debate progresses

14. New research tools

14.1. Using collaborative concept mapping as a means of involving teachers as co-researchers Preston/Leask/Pachler

14.2. Group discussion on methodologies recorded by Professot Loveless, University of Brighton

15. Key points

15.1. The researcher may not agree wih the priorities of a 'disadvantaged community'

15.1.1. Ros Sutherland

15.2. We should be teaching about programming as much as about application

15.2.1. Reference George Auckland

15.2.1.1. Some discussion about this on the ITTE Mailing list (see http://itte.org.uk/) and of course CAS is addressing this in more specific ways (see http://www.computingatschool.org.uk/)

15.2.2. Group discussion recorded by Anne Jones: Open University

15.3. we should be obsessed with curriculum content especially creationism for 10 year olds- we can teach evolution to 10 year olds using a computer

15.3.1. Richard Noss

15.3.1.1. Presumably this means we should NOT be obsessed with creationism, but instead with evolution?

15.4. We should be more politically aware as a community

15.4.1. Neil Selwyn

15.4.1.1. Just read Net Delusion: that's a good start

15.5. We need to join up with other disciplines in order to ask the right research questions about the impact on young people of digital technologies

15.5.1. Jean Underwood

15.6. Communities do not like to be called disadvantaged

15.6.1. Ros Sutherland

15.7. Technology can open up new kinds of knowledge that cannot be developed in any other way....

15.8. Do we focus on classrooms or class; education or social sciences- or both?

15.9. What are the implicit assumptions we are making about our resesearch?

16. 'Google Days' for learners in the community - no teachers, but vygotskian groups working on own projects (using new microbroadcasting technologies to distribute content at neighbourhood level).

16.1. I like the notion of neighbourhood level learning. We are learning more about the issues of social bonding in online contexts - that strong ties are embedded in RL not in VL, so combining RL and VL through neighbourhoods seems an interesting strategy to get the best of both sources of knowledge and action.

17. Debate speakers

17.1. Charles Crook

17.1.1. A narrative of hope:

17.2. Neil Selwyn

17.2.1. People in CAL do get 'social justice' but this does not come out in the research narrative which has a very instrumentsalist approach.