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MITE6330 Learning Design and Technology by Fung Wing Ho (2009873254) by Mind Map: MITE6330 Learning Design and Technology by Fung Wing Ho (2009873254)
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MITE6330 Learning Design and Technology by Fung Wing Ho (2009873254)

Design of Learning/Instructional Products

Reference: Reiser, R. A. (2001). A history of instructional design and technology: Part i: A history of instructional media. ETR&D, 49(1), 53-64.. Reiser, R. A. (2001). A history of instructional design and technology: Part II: A history of instructional media. ETR&D, 49(2), 57-67. Churchill, D. (2006). Teachers' private theories and their design of technology-based learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 37(4), 559-576. Moallem, M. (1998). An expert techer's thinking and teaching and instructional design models and principles: an ethnographic study. ETR&D, 46(2), 37-64.

Features of Instructional Design

Reiser, R. A. (2001). A history of instructional design and technology: Part i: A history of instructional media. ETR&D, 49(1), 53-64

Learning Technology Products

Product Development Stages

Churchill, D. (2006). Teachers' private theories and their design of technology-based learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 37(4), 559-576.

Project Development Team

Instructional Design Models

References: Mergel, B (1998). Instructional design & learning theories. Available at: http://www.usask.ca/education/coursework/802papers/mergel/brenda.htm Chapter 10 “The events of instruction” from Gagne, R., Briggs, L. J., & Wager, W. W. (1992). Principles of instructional design. Orlando, FL: Harcourt Brace College Publishers. Merrill, M. D., Li, Z., & Jones, M. K. (1990). Second generation instructional design (ID2). Educational Technology, 30(2), 7-14. Available at: http://mdavidmerrill.com/Papers/ID1&ID2.PDF Merrill, M. D., & ID2_Research_Group. (1996). Instructional transaction theory: instructional design based on knowledge objects. Educational Technology, 36(3), 30-37. Available at: http://mdavidmerrill.com/Papers/TxBased_KO.PDF Merrill, M. D. (2002). Knowledge objects and mental models. In D. A. Wiley (Ed.), The Instructional Use of Learning Objects (pp. 261-280). Washington DC: Agency for Instructional Technology & Association for Educational Communications and Technology. Available at: http://mdavidmerrill.com/Papers/KOMentalModels.PDF Cisco. (1999). Cisco Systems reusable information object strategy: definition, creation overview, and guidelines. Cisco Systems, Inc. Available at: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/779/ibs/solutions/.../el_cisco_rio.pdf

Linear Model by Dick & Carey (1990)

Spiral Model by Romiszowski (1981)

Rapid Prototype Model by Tripp & Bichelmeyer (1990)

Oval Model by Kemp (1985)

Top-to-Bottom Model by Braden (1996)

Technology Instructive Models

Technology Constructivist Models

Designing Instruction/Learning Technology Product

References: Mayer, E. R. (2003). The promise of multimedia learning: using the same instructional design methods across different media. Learning & Instruction, 13, 125-139. Van Merrienboer, J. J., Clark, R. E., & de Croock, M. B. (2002). Blueprints for Complex Learning: The 4C/ID-Model. ETR&D, 50(2), 39-64. Schank, C. R., Berman, R. T., & Macpherson, A. K. (1999). Learning by doing. In C.M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-Design Theories and Models: A New Paradigm of Instructional Theory, volume 2 (pp.397-424). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc. Jonassen, D. (1999). Designing constructivist learning environments. In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional Design Theories and Models: A New Paradigm of Instructional Theory, volume 2 (pp. 215—239). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Savery, J. R., & Duffy, T. M. (1995). Problem based learning: an instructional model and its constructivist framework. Educational Technology, 35(5), 31-38 Jonassen, D. (2000). Towards design theory of problem solving. ETR&D, 48(4), 63-85 Grabinger, R. S., & Dunlap, J. C. (1995). Rich environments for active learning: a definition. Association for Learning Technology Journal, 3(2). 5- 34. Available at: http://repository.alt.ac.uk/11/1/CALT_A_00302005_O.pdf

Define a Goal(s)

Conduct Instructional Analysis (Performance, Task, Content Analysis)

Analyze Learners and Context

Writing Performance/ Learning Objectives

Develop Assessment Strategy

Develop Instructional Strategy

Arrange Instructional Events

Events of Instruction (Gagne, Briggs and Wager (1992))

Multimedia Learning

Mayer, E. R. (2003). The promise of multimedia learning: using the same instructional design methods across different media. Learning & Instruction, 13, 125-139.

Instruction Model (4C)

Van Merrienboer, J. J., Clark, R. E., & de Croock, M. B. (2002). Blueprints for Complex Learning: The 4C/ID-Model. ETR&D, 50(2), 39-64. Schank, C. R., Berman, R. T., & Macpherson, A. K. (1999). Learning by doing. In C.M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-Design Theories and Models: A New Paradigm of Instructional Theory, volume 2 (pp.397-424). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc.

Problem-based Learning Design

Savery, J. R., & Duffy, T. M. (1995). Problem based learning: an instructional model and its constructivist framework. Educational Technology, 35(5), 31-3

Development of a Product

References:   Hill, J. R., & Hannafin, M. J. (2001). Teaching and learning in digital environments: the resurgence of resource-based learning. ETR&D, 49(3), 37-52.   Oliver, R., & Herrington, J. (2001). Teaching and learning on-line: a beginner’s guide to e-learning and e-teaching in higher education. Perth, Australia: Edith Cowan University. Available at http://elrond.scam.ecu.edu.au/oliver/2002/TALO2.pdf   Churchill, D. (2006). Student-centered learning design: key components, technology role!and!frameworks!for!integration.!Synergy,!4(1),!18;28.  

Multimedia Learning Theory (Mayer, 2003)

Learning by Doing/ Case-based Reasoning (Schank, Berman & MacPhersoon, 1999)

Kolb Learning Cycle

Dufour's 'Learning by Doing'

Resource-based learning (Churchill, 2006; Oliver & Herrington, 2001; Hill & Hannafin, 2001)

Constructivist Learning Environment (Jonassen, 1999)

Designing for Concept Learning

References: Bonk, C. J., & Cunningham, D. J. (1998). Searching for learner-centered, constructivist, and sociocultural components of collaborative educational learning tools. In C.J. Bonk, & K.S. Kind (Eds.), Electronic collaborators: Learner-centered technologies for literacy, apprenticeship, and discourse, (pp. 25-50). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Available at http://www.publicationshare.com/docs/Bon02.pdf   Jonassen, H. D. (2006). On the role of concepts in learning and instructional design. ETR&D, 54(2), 177-196.   Jonassen, H. D. & Rohrer-Murphy, L. (1999). Activity theory as a framework for designing constructivist learning environment. ERT&D, 47(1), pp. 61-99.

Concepts are mental representations of categories of objects, events, or other entities.

Concepts play essential roles in human reasoning

Implications for conceptual change for concept learning and assessment

Constructivist learning environments (CLE)

Process for designing CLEs

Web 2.0-based Learning Technologies

References: Churchill, D. (2007). Web 2.0 and possibilities for educational applications. Educational Technology, 47(2), 24-29.

What is Web 2.0?

Examples

Designing Learning Technology for Mobile Learning

References: Patten, B., Sánchez, I. A., & Tangney, B. (2006). Designing collaborative, constructionist and contextual applications for handheld devices. Computers & Education, 46(3), 294-308.

Mobile Technogies

Affordances of Mobile Technology for Education

Multimedia Assess Tool

Connectivity Tool

Capture Tool

Analytical Tool

Representational Tool

Access anytime in anywhere

Functional Framework for designing for mobile learning (Byran Pattern, Sa'nchez, & Tangney, 2006)

Intelligent design of the future

My Reflection

The future is a mobile world. It requires appropriate design and technology support in order to fully utilize the advantages of using mobile device for learning. Different approaches have their own different set up and characteristics. I think the most important thing is to fit the design with the actual using environment. It should undergo analysis, designing, testing, reflecting and improving in order to produce a successful and perfect learning design.