My Foundation of Education

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My Foundation of Education af Mind Map: My Foundation of Education

1. Curriculum and Pedagogy

1.1. Developmentalist Curriculum

1.1.1. 1. Student-centered

1.1.2. 2. Curricula developmentally related

1.1.3. 3. John Dewey

1.2. Transformative Tradition

1.2.1. 4. Active student participation

1.2.2. 5. Student growth

1.2.3. 6. Less authoritarian

1.2.4. 7. Invisible pedagogy

2. Schools as Organizations

2.1. Local and State Steakholders

2.1.1. 1. Jeff Sessions (R)

2.1.2. 2. Richard Shelby (R)

2.1.3. 3. Mo Brooks (R)

2.1.4. 4. Dr Tommy Bice

2.1.5. 5. Dr Cynthia McCarty

2.1.6. 6. Dr Ed Nichols

2.1.7. 7. Karen Duke

2.1.8. 8. Joe Propst

2.1.9. 9. Michele King

2.1.10. 10. Dwight Jett, Jr

2.1.11. 11. Donnie Lane

2.2. Structure

2.2.1. 12. President of the United States of America

2.2.2. 13. United States Department of Education

2.2.3. 14. State Senators

2.2.4. 15. House of Representatives

2.2.5. 16. State Superintendent

2.2.6. 17. Representative(s) on State School Board

2.2.7. 18. Local Superintendent

2.2.8. 19. Local School Board

2.2.9. 20. Principal

2.2.10. 21. Teacher

2.2.11. 22. Student

2.3. Nature of Teaching and Professionalization

2.3.1. 23. Role Switching

2.3.2. 24. Routine Schedule

2.3.3. 25. Creativity

2.3.4. 26. Rewarding

2.3.5. 27. Interdependence

2.3.6. 28. TEP Reform

2.3.7. 29. School-based Management

3. Politics of Education

3.1. Liberal Perspective

3.1.1. 1. Equality of opportunity and "quality with equality"

3.1.2. 2. Socializing

3.1.3. 3. Cultural diversity

3.1.4. 4. Development of student "self"

3.1.4.1. Interests

3.1.4.2. Talents

3.1.4.3. Creativity

3.1.4.4. Unique identity

3.1.5. 5. Teacher empowerment

3.2. Progressivism

3.2.1. 5. Shaping our changing future society

3.2.2. 6. Reaching individual potential

4. Equality of Opportunity

4.1. Educational Achievement and Attainment of Women

4.1.1. 1. Higher Graduation Rate

4.1.2. 2. High Reading Proficiency

4.1.3. 3. High Writing Proficiency

4.1.4. 4. High Enrollment in Post-Secondary Institutions

4.2. School and Race/SES

4.2.1. 5. Geoffrey Borman

4.2.2. 6. Maritza Dowling

4.2.3. 7. Student Achievement Outcomes

4.2.3.1. Adversely Affected by:

4.2.3.1.1. High Poverty Schools

4.2.3.1.2. Segregated Schools

4.2.3.2. Integrated Classes Outweigh:

4.2.3.2.1. Individual's Race

4.2.3.2.2. Individual's SES

5. Educational Inequality

5.1. Victim Blaming

5.1.1. 1. Baratz & Baratz

5.1.2. 2. Dougherty & Hammack

5.1.3. 3. Ryan

5.1.4. 4. Racist

5.1.5. 5. Teacher Insignificant

5.1.6. 6. Parental Blame

5.2. School-centered Explanations

5.2.1. 7. Curriculum Tracking

5.2.1.1. Affects elementary through graduation

5.2.2. 8. Teacher Expectations

5.2.2.1. Self-fulfilling Prophecy

6. History of U.S. Education

6.1. Common School Movement

6.1.1. 1. Horace Mann

6.1.2. 2. Normal School

6.1.2.1. Teacher training school

6.1.2.2. Raise teacher salaries

6.1.3. 3. Public elementary schools

6.1.3.1. Common School

6.1.3.2. Social mobility

6.1.4. 4. Taxpayer funding

6.1.5. 5. Mandatory student attendance

6.2. Democratic-Liberal Historical Interpretation

6.2.1. 6. Lawrence A. Cremin

6.2.2. 7. Expansion of educational opportunities

6.2.3. 8. Balance of equally important ideals of equality and excellence

7. Sociological Perspectives

7.1. Symbolic Interactionism

7.1.1. 1. George Herbert Mead

7.1.2. 2. Herbert Blumer

7.1.3. 3. Charles Cooley

7.1.4. 4. Socialization

7.1.5. 5. Three symbolic interaction tenants

7.1.5.1. Action based on meaning

7.1.5.2. Different meaning based on social interactions

7.1.5.3. Meanings can change

7.1.6. 6. Individualized perspective

7.1.7. 7. I versus Me

7.1.7.1. I - not socially concerned

7.1.7.2. Me - socially aware

7.1.7.2.1. Looking-glass Self

7.1.8. 8. Self-fulfilling prophecy

7.1.9. 9. Schooling Knowledge and Attituides

7.1.9.1. Effective Schools Research

7.1.9.2. Greater knowledge and social participation

7.1.9.3. Greater sense of well-being and self-esteem

7.1.10. 10. Employment

7.1.10.1. Gatekeepers

7.1.10.2. Demand for higher levels of education

8. Philosophy of Education

8.1. Pragmatism

8.1.1. Notions

8.1.1.1. 1. Progressive education

8.1.1.2. 2. Embryonic community

8.1.1.2.1. Experiential

8.1.1.2.2. Traditional

8.1.2. Key scholars

8.1.2.1. 3. John Dewey (1859 - 1952)

8.1.2.2. 4. Frances Bacon (1561 - 1626)

8.1.3. Educational goal

8.1.3.1. 5. Dialectic of Freedom

8.1.3.1.1. Needs of society

8.1.3.1.2. Needs of student

8.1.3.2. 6. Democratic society

8.1.4. Role of teacher

8.1.4.1. 7. Facilitator

8.1.4.1.1. Encourage

8.1.4.1.2. Question

8.1.4.1.3. Suggest

8.1.4.1.4. Implement

8.1.5. Method of Intruction

8.1.5.1. 8. Problem-solving method

8.1.5.2. 9. Project method

8.1.6. Curriculum

8.1.6.1. 10. Expanding environments

8.1.6.1.1. Start with problem

8.1.6.1.2. Work from known to unknown

9. Educational Reform

9.1. Goals 2000

9.1.1. 1. Bill Clinton

9.1.2. 2. Equity issues addressed

9.1.3. 3. Systemic reform

9.1.4. 4. Equality of learning opportunity

9.1.5. 5. High school graduation requirements

9.1.6. 6. Direct Government Student Loans