America's Participation in WWII

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America's Participation in WWII by Mind Map: America's Participation in WWII

1. Students will learn about the different regimes that were taking over Europe (in Italy, the Soviet Union, Germany and Japan) and about American’s involvement in the war before the attack on Pearl Harbor by doing completing a timeline and writing a paragraph.

1.1. Formative: At the end of the close reading and after they complete their timeline students will respond to a question in 1-2 paragraphs (Question: Before the attack on Pearl Harbor there was lots of turmoil happening around the world. Briefly explain what was happening in countries like Italy, Russia, Germany and Japan before the attack. Also, do you think that Presidents Roosevelt’s decision to help China contributed to the attack on Pearl Harbor? Explain why or why not.)

1.1.1. Students will remain Students will remain engaged during the lesson by following along with the teacher as the explains headings, subheading and bold face words.

1.1.2. Students will then engage in a Jigsaw reading comprehension activity in which they will work win groups in order to complete a reading and answer their assigned questions.

1.1.3. Students will then participate in a discussion. Once all groups are done identifying the main ideas to their assigned sections, students will be randomly selected to share their answers (main ideas) with the rest of the class (all students will have to share during the class discussion). While one student is sharing, the rest of the class will be filling in their timeline and making sure that they add the main ideas for each section of the reading.

1.1.4. Teacher will explain to students what the reading will be about and why it is important for them to know this information. After the teacher has explained this, she will instruct all students to open their textbooks and turn to pg. 529. The entire class will follow along as the teacher reads all the headings and sub headings in the reading as well as when the teacher explain the definitions of the bold face words in the text. Teacher will then use the Jigsaw reading comprehension strategy in order to ensure that all the students remain engaged during the completion of the reading

2. Special Fighting Forces

2.1. Students will learn about the Tuskegee Airmen, the 442nd Regimental Combat team and the Navajo Code talkers by listening to a lecture, completing guided notes and answering a Ticket out the Door question.

2.1.1. Formative: At the end of the lesson students will answer the Ticket Out The Door question which will evaluate their understanding of the days lesson. Question: Write one significant contribution that each special fighting force (Tuskegee Airmen, 442nd Regimental Combat team, and Navajo Code talkers) made during the war. Analyze why the men in these special fighting forces choose to become involved in the war?

2.1.1.1. Teacher: will present a lecture about the Tuskegee Airmen, the 442nd Regimental Combat team and the Navajo Code talkers. The lecture will give students historical information about the treatment of African Americans, Japanese- Americans and Navajos before the war as well as inform them about all the events that these special fighting partook in before, during and after the war

2.1.1.2. Students: will remain engaged during the lesson by completing a guided notes worksheets that will be distributed to them at the beginning of class.

2.1.1.3. Students: will engage in a table group discussion in order to answer the "Food for Though" questions that will be posed to them through out the power point lecture.

3. Changes in Europe and American Isolationism

4. Japanese Internment

4.1. Students will learn what life was like in a Japanese internment camp by analyze primary source documents about Japanese interment in the United States and by answering questions about the primary sources. Students will then demonstrate their understanding of Japanese internment by writing a 2 paragraph response to a formative assessment question

4.1.1. Formative: • At the end of the photograph/document analysis, students will write a two paragraph analysis about these sources. (Question: In the first paragraph of your document analysis you will compare and contrast the different sources. (What do these document have in common? How are these documents different from each other?). In the second paragraph of your document analysis explain what YOU think life in an internment camp was really like (make sure to use quotes from the text to support your claim).

4.1.1.1. Teacher will provide students with a primary source analysis worksheet (blank) which students will complete independently. The worksheet asks students to analyze/read various primary source photographs and documents and then answer questions about those primary sources. Additionally, once they have completed the primary source analysis worksheet students will have time to share their answers with a partner and with the class in order to prepare for their formative assessment.

4.1.1.2. Students will remain engaged during the lesson by analyzing the primary source documents on their worksheet and answering the accompanying questions (the worksheet will be distributed at the beginning of class). The worksheet is divided into 3 sections for each section students will have to analyze/read the primary sources that have been provided, answer the questions that accompany the primary source.

4.1.1.3. Once students are done analyzing their primary source and answering the accompanying questions they will then share their answers with their elbow partner (the person sitting next to them)

4.1.1.4. Once students are done comparing/sharing their answers with their elbow partner students will participate in a class discussion which will be led by the teacher.

5. U.S. and Allied Strategies

5.1. Students will understand U.S./Allied wartime strategies. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the various wartime strategies that the U.S. and the Allies used in order to succeed in World War II through the use of a simulation.

5.1.1. Formative: The teacher will use the simulation activity to understand whether students understand the material that is being taught to them. In addition to the simulation activity, students will have their progress monitored through the discussions that they had during the activity and at the end of the class (lesson closure). In listening to the student’s discussion and answers, the instructor can understand what needs to be retaught or revisited for increased understanding. Summative: In order to ensure that students have a complete grasp on the days lesson the teacher will ask questions that all students will have to answer orally during the discussion at the end. Additionally, the teacher will give students a grade for their paragraphs that they wrote through out the activity (grades will not be based on whether students choose the correct strategy, it will instead be based on the rational/evidence they used to justify their answer)

5.1.1.1. Teacher provide each group four folders labeled: “Decision 1”, “Decision 2”, “Decision 3” and “Decision 4.” Each folder will contain 4 documents: an informational reading, a map, proposed strategies document and a lined piece of paper in which students will write their one paragraph response.

5.1.1.2. The lesson will close with a classroom discussion that the teacher will lead. The teacher will ask students to discuss what strategy they choose for decision 1, decision 2, decision 3 and decision 4. If all students agree on the same strategy the teacher will explain why that particular strategy was the best. If students did not agree on the same strategy then the teacher will ask questions about why certain people choose a particular strategy, what are the benefits to the strategy and what are the draw backs.

5.1.1.3. In groups of four, students will take on the roles of U.S. military analysts to provide recommendations on four key military decisions. Before making a decision, students will gather background information by reading an informational worksheet, examining a map and evaluating proposed military strategies. Once they have discussed with their groups what the best military strategy is, they will work together to write a one-paragraph response explaining the relational behind the strategy that they choose.

5.1.1.4. Students will participate in a classroom discussion in which they will discuss and debate which is the best strategy to use for every decision that they were presented with.

6. Dropping of the Atomic Bombs

6.1. Students will analyze whether the droppings of the atomic bombs on Nagasaki and Hiroshima were justified by analyzing primary and secondary sources in a Thiinking Hat Activity, participating in a TV Show Chat discussion and by completing a formative assessment.

6.1.1. Formative: As students are working in their groups the teacher will be walking around the classroom listening to their conversations and asking them questions. By asking students questions the teacher will give students an opportunity for deeper thinking and provides teachers with significant insight into the degree and depth of student understanding. Questions of this nature engage students in classroom dialogue that expands student learning. Additionally, students will complete their “Atomic Bomb” worksheet in which they will write arguments for and against (with evidence) the dropping of the atomic bombs.

6.1.1.1. Before the students arrive, the teacher will have set up a gallery of photographs around the class these photographs will consists of American soldiers dying at the hands of the Japanese, crimes that the Japanese committed during the war, scientists working on the Manhattan Project, images of the atomic bombs, atomic bomb victims (both dead and alive) and images of the Allies celebrating the end of the war.

6.1.1.2. Teacher will then divide the class in two-halves, distribute the discussion question worksheet and as well as primary and secondary source material. The teacher will then give each student a colored bookmark and explain how the Thinking Hat Activity will be conducted.

6.1.1.3. Teacher will lead a class discussion (called TV Chat Show) in which she will guide students through the discussion questions.

6.1.1.4. Students will participate in a gallery walk in which they will get to see photographs of American soldiers dying at the hands of the Japanese, crimes that the Japanese committed during the war, scientists working on the Manhattan Project, images of the atomic bombs, atomic bomb victims (both dead and alive) and images of the Allies celebrating the end of the war.

6.1.1.5. Students will participate in a Thinking Hat Activiy in which they will eachl be assigned a bookmark of a different color and be asked to analyze primary and secondary source documents in order to answer the discussion questions with their groups.

6.1.1.6. Students will participate in a TV Chat Show discussion in which they will answer the discussion questions with evidence from the text. The audience (the other groups) will have an opportunity to ask questions during this portion of the activity

6.1.2. Summative: Students will write a two-paragraph (5-7 sentences) response to the question (“Should have the United States dropped the atomic bombs on Nagasaki and Hiroshima? Use evidence to support your answer.”) The student’s grade on the paragraph response will not be based on whether they choose a specific position; instead their grade will be based on how many pieces of historical information and evidence that they have used to support their position.