(July 24)  Mark 14:12-31

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(July 24)  Mark 14:12-31 by Mind Map: (July 24)  Mark 14:12-31

1. #2 - He Makes Provision For Them

1.1. Another Markan Sandwhich

1.1.1. Abandonment (vs 17-21)

1.1.2. Abandonment (26-31)

1.1.3. Lords Supper

1.2. The reinterpreation of the passover

1.2.1. Summary

1.2.1.1. Jesus is reunderstandign the passover, an understanding that stands against and independent of the temple, which he has just challenged (ch 11-12) and predicted the end of (13)

1.2.2. My body

1.2.2.1. summary

1.2.2.1.1. The head of a family took bread eaten at every meal, lifted it up, and said, “Praise be Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe, who causes bread to come forth from the earth.” After the Amen response, the bread was broken and distributed, mediating the blessing to each one who ate. The same was true over the wine (see m. Ber. 6: 1 on the blessing over “the fruit of the vine”). Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 526). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.2.2.1.2. Jeremias puts it this way: When at the daily meal the paterfamilias recites the blessing over the bread... and breaks it and hands a piece to each member to eat, the meaning of the action tion is that each of the members is made a recipient of the blessing by this eating; ing; the common "Amen" and the common eating of the bread of benediction tion unite the members into a table fellowship. The same is true of the "cup of blessing" which is the cup of wine over which grace has been spoken, when it is in circulation among the members: drinking from it mediates a share in the blessing.s7 Ben Witherington III. The Gospel of Mark: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary (Kindle Locations 5617-5621). Kindle Edition.

1.2.2.1.3. So the presider would get up, and he would bless the various elements (the bread, the herbs, the lamb), and he would say, “This is the bread of our affliction, which our fathers ate in the wilderness.” So he’s explaining the meaning of this great deliverance through the elements of the food. Imagine the astonishment of the disciples when Jesus gets up (he’s the presider at this Passover), and he begins to bless the elements, and he begins to explain the symbolism of the elements, but he begins to talk about something different. He shows them the bread and says, “… this is my body.” What does that mean? “This is the bread of my affliction, this is the bread of my suffering, because I’m going to lead the ultimate exodus and bring you the ultimate deliverance from bondage.” Do you know what he’s saying, when he says, “This is my body. This is my blood”? Here’s what he’s saying. He says, “Just as once this meal was observed the night before God redeemed Israel from slavery to Pharaoh, through Moses, tonight we eat it before the night in which God is going to redeem from sin, death, and evil itself the world through me. This is not just a salvation from social and economic bondage, as bad as that was, through Moses. This is salvation from death and sin and evil itself through me.” Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.2.2.2. v22

1.2.2.2.1. bread

1.2.2.3. v23

1.2.2.3.1. Mark is the only Gospel writer who adds, "and they all drank from it." 25 The "all" echoes throughout the remainder of the chapter, recalling both the grace of Jesus and the failure of the disciples: they "all drank" (v. 23), they "all [swear allegiance to Jesus]" (v. 31); but they "all fall away" (v. 27), and they "all fled" (v. 50). The original Last Supper is attended by traitors (v. 18) and cowards (v. 50); it a table not of merit but of grace! Edwards Jr., James R.. The Gospel according to Mark (The Pillar New Testament Commentary (PNTC)) (Kindle Locations 7601-7604). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

1.2.2.4. Jesus presides over the feast

1.2.2.4.1. summary

1.2.3. My blood

1.2.3.1. summary

1.2.3.1.1. The second element was the wine. The cup went around four times to represent the four promises God made to the children of Israel before he took them out. In Exodus 6, he says these four great promises. He says, “I will bring you out. I will rid you of your bondage. I will pay your redemption price, and I will take you away to be my people.” Every time the cup, the wine, goes around, it was to commemorate those four promises. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.2.3.1.2. No. What does God say? God says to the Israelites, “I want every family among you to kill a lamb and put blood on the doorposts to show you have sacrificed a lamb.” Why? Do you know what that means? It’s fascinating. It fascinates me. God did not send his angel down just to smite the bad people. He wasn’t smiting a particular race. He wasn’t smiting a particular religion. What God was doing was he was saying, “I’m going to send my sword of judgment down there, and the sword of judgment will fall on all people who are …” What? “All people who deserve judgment, and everybody deserves judgment. This sword is going to come down on everybody unless provision is made.” You’ll see that. “The good people and the bad people, the people with the right religion and the people with the ‘wrong’ religion.” Why? God is no respecter of persons. The God of the Hebrew Scriptures is not the vindictive person he’s often depicted as. He’s not just saying, “I’m going to lift up the people of the race I like and put down the people of the race I don’t like.” Oh no. God says, “I can spring you because what I can do is I can actually send down the sword of judgment into a group of people, but that means everybody in that land will be subject to judgment unless some provision is made for your sins, so kill a lamb, put the blood on the door, take shelter under the blood of the lamb, and the angel of death will pass over that place.” That’s the reason why every year in the Passover you have the bread, you have the cup, and you have the lamb. Here’s Jesus, and he’s doing the Passover. That night … You read these words. He said, “Here’s the bread. This is my body. Here’s the cup. This is the blood of the covenant. Now let’s go.” You are so used to this, especially if you’ve come to church in the past. You’re so used to those words you don’t realize how the disciples would’ve been thunderstruck by them, in two ways. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.2.3.1.3. the head of the household hold rose again from his reclining position and exhorted those present to "Speak praises to our God, to whom belongs what we have eaten," to which those present replied, "Praised be our God for the food we have eaten." With his right hand he then took the third cup of red wine mixed with water, and with his eyes on the cup pronounced the prayer of thanksgiving on behalf of all, with the concluding words: "May the All-merciful One make us worthy of the days of the Messiah and of the life of the world to come. He brings the salvation of his king. He shows covenant-faithfulness to his Anointed, to David and to his seed forever. He makes peace in his heavenly places. May he secure peace for us and for all Israel. And say you, Amen." William L. Lane. The Gospel of Mark (Kindle Locations 5311-5316). Kindle Edition.

1.2.3.1.4. subsittute

1.2.3.2. v24

1.2.3.2.1. one cup.

1.2.3.2.2. blood

1.2.3.2.3. covenant

1.2.3.2.4. many

1.2.3.2.5. Jesus predicts their betrayal and uses language that has driven others away

1.2.3.2.6. for many

1.3. SUBSTITUTION!!!!

1.3.1. ILL: She needed a hug!!! nurse

1.3.1.1. Thats us!

1.4. Application

1.4.1. Jesus invites us to the Supper

1.4.1.1. Jesus does the guiding

1.4.1.1.1. Jews reckoned the new day beginning at sunset, and "evening" signaled 15 Nisan, the time for the Passover meal. The holiest festival of the Jewish year, Passover commemorated the deliverance from Egypt when the angel of death "passed over" the firstborn in Jewish homes with lambs' blood on the door frames (Exodus 12). As the eldest male interpreted the feast, accents fell on remembering their past deliverance from Egypt and on anticipating the future redemption of the Messiah. According to the Mishnah tractate Pesahim 10, a Passover liturgy consisted of the recitation of the Hallel Psalms (Psalms 113– 18). The actual meal was divided into four parts, each concluding with the drinking of a cup of wine. A blessing was first pronounced by the family head over the gathering. Then, in response to a child's question, "' Why is this night different from other nights?'" the father recounted the deliverance from Egypt according to Deut 26: 5-9. Third, the father pronounced a benediction over the various foods that symbolized the bitter captivity in Egypt and both the hardships and blessings of the Exodus: unleavened bread, bitter herbs, greens, stewed fruit, and roast lamb. Family and guests were then invited to partake of the meal. Near midnight the feast concluded with the singing of Psalms 116– 18 and the drinking of the fourth cup of wine. Edwards Jr., James R.. The Gospel according to Mark (The Pillar New Testament Commentary (PNTC)) (Kindle Locations 7533-7542). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

1.4.1.2. This was a fmaily meal

1.4.2. Future drink

1.4.2.1. summary

1.4.2.2. v25

1.4.2.3. The cup from which Jesus abstained was the fourth, which ordinarily concluded the Passover fellowship.," The significance of this can be appreciated from the fact that the four cups of wine were interpreted in terms of the four-fold promise of redemption set forth in Exod. 6:6-7: "I will bring you out ... I will rid you of their bondage ... I will redeem you ... I will take you for my people and I will be your God" (TJ Pesachim chim X. 37b). Jesus had used the third cup, associated with the promise of redemption, to refer to his atoning death on behalf of the elect community. munity. The cup which he refused was the cup of consummation, associated ciated with the promise that God will take his people to be with him. This is the cup which Jesus will drink with his own in the messianic banquet which inaugurates the saving age to come. The cup of redemption tion (verse 24), strengthened by the vow of abstinence (verse 25), constitutes stitutes the solemn pledge that the fourth cup will be extended and the unfinished meal completed in the consummation, when Messiah eats with redeemed sinners in the Kingdom of God (cf. Lk. 14:15; Rev. 3:20f.; 19:6-9). William L. Lane. The Gospel of Mark (Kindle Locations 5338-5345). Kindle Edition.

1.5. Jesus is the feast

1.5.1. Bread

1.5.1.1. A rememberance to the agony of the jews. It was to be a part of that. To feel that. To put your feet, your soul, your heart in that place. We suffered there. That was not just our ancestors but they through lineage was us. It was bitter!

1.5.1.2. ILL: Bread a few weeks ago. Bitter. my fault. but in some sense real

1.6. Lords Supper

1.6.1. 1 Cor 5:7

1.6.2. participate

1.6.2.1. You shall tell your son on that day, ‘It is because of what the LORD did for me when I came out of Egyp The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2001). (Ex 13:8). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

1.6.2.2. Hunter points out that “remembering” in the biblical idiom “is not to entertain a pallid idea of a past event in one’s mind, but to make the event present again so that it controls the will and becomes potent in our lives for good or ill.” 26 Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 534). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.6.2.3. The Lord’s Supper works for good. It reminds us who we are, what our story is, what our values are, and who claims us as his own. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 534). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.6.2.4. We look back to Jesus’ Last Supper and experience the beginning of the new covenant with God. We experience Jesus’ death for us and the power of our sins being forgiven in the present. We look forward to the future celebration in God’s kingdom, when all will acknowledge Jesus as Lord. When Jesus distributes the wine to his disciples, he solemnly assures that he will be vindicated by God and will drink it anew in the kingdom of God. His words contain an implicit promise that those “who shared His table in the time of His obscurity, would also share it in the time of His glory.” 27 Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 534). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.6.3. communion

1.6.3.1. Hunter points out that “remembering” in the biblical idiom “is not to entertain a pallid idea of a past event in one’s mind, but to make the event present again so that it controls the will and becomes potent in our lives for good or ill.” 26 Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 534). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.6.3.2. Engages all 5 sesnse - see, hear, taste, smell and touch

1.6.3.3. It also binds the past, present, and future together. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 534). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.7. by faith

1.7.1. One does not become a beneficiary of Jesus’ redemptive death through participation in any rite. Did Judas partake of the bread and drink the cup? If he did, it had no salvific effect (Acts 1: 25). Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 534). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2. #3 - He Overcomes Them

2.1. Does it work?

2.2. What good is Jesus? He too has failed has he not?

2.2.1. Opening Thought

2.2.1.1. World leaders death vs Jesus death

2.2.1.2. Who looks at Jesus and says - That's the one i want? Who says that's the path for me?

2.2.1.2.1. Especially true in our climate, is it not? We all want leaders that are successful, measured triumph, we can see and give us the promise to be great like them. We all jump on that wagon right?

2.2.1.3. But what if you are following a leader and that's what you thought he'd be like but it turned out wrong? Opposite? You jump ship?

2.2.2. Here is why?  The importance of his death.

2.2.3. One of the thigns this passage challenges us on is why would anyone NOT abondon christ?

2.2.3.1. Or put this way - why would anyone want Jesus?

2.2.4. So many stories of lives changed!

2.2.5. Peter .... life changed!

2.3. What does this mean for the failure of my faith?

2.3.1. Mark 14:27–28 (ESV) — 27 And Jesus said to them, “You will all fall away, for it is written, ‘I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered.’ 28 But after I am raised up, I will go before you to Galilee.”

2.4. Jesus work - resurrection

2.4.1. LUke - I pray for you

2.4.1.1. Luke 22:31–34 (ESV) — 31 “Simon, Simon, behold, Satan demanded to have you, that he might sift you like wheat, 32 but I have prayed for you that your faith may not fail. And when you have turned again, strengthen your brothers.” 33 Peter said to him, “Lord, I am ready to go with you both to prison and to death.” 34 Jesus said, “I tell you, Peter, the rooster will not crow this day, until you deny three times that you know me.”

2.5. Jesus firmly believed that his death was not a stroke of fate but that its purpose lay deep within the providence of God. He viewed this death as a representative death for the many. It was something that they were unable to supply for themselves but which he supplies for them, standing alone in the breach. He views his death positively, as part of his vocation, and connects it closely with the kingdom of God, which brings salvation to humans. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 533). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.6. Substitution and the wonder of it!

2.7. Heed his call of love!

2.7.1. Why did he say this?

2.7.2. He loves us to enable us

3. CONCLUSION

3.1. At some piont you will fail!!! What is your hope?

3.1.1. Marks audience and Nero - persecution. Death of Paul and Peter.

3.1.1.1. The abandonment

3.1.1.2. early church

3.1.1.3. debate

3.1.1.4. penance

3.1.1.5. LISTEN - penance has been made! Will you believe him?

3.2. LISTEN TO THE LIFE OF JUDAS

3.2.1. Mark 14:21 (ESV) — 21 For the Son of Man goes as it is written of him, but woe to that man by whom the Son of Man is betrayed! It would have been better for that man if he had not been born.”

3.3. Repent

3.3.1. Judas is given a chance here

3.3.2. His life is wasted!

3.3.3. LISTEN!

3.4. Receive

3.4.1. vs 22 - recieve the bread

3.4.1.1. it's not just I died for you. It's take it! receive it. appropriate it.

3.4.2. Drink the cup

3.5. misc

3.5.1. The work of Jesus prior!!!

3.5.1.1. he father runs across the grass. He runs across the field. He cuts maybe across. He jumps on his son, grabs ahold of him, and hugs him and kisses him before he even says a word of repentance. In other words, the father doesn’t say, “If you repent, I will kiss you.” Oh, no. The father kisses him so it is easy to repent. That’s the way it is here. Jesus says, “I will come to you in love so you can turn back.” The love of Jesus Christ is always prior. He does not sit back and say, “You Judases. You Peters. You come to me, and then maybe I’ll reach out to you.” He says, “No, no, no. I reach out to you, and that’s the only reason you’ll ever be able to come back to me.” Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

3.5.1.2. He does the same thing with Judas. You say, “Where is that?” It’s not quite as clear, but in the book of Matthew … One of the most astounding verses to me is in the book of Matthew 26:50, when it talks about this very incident of betrayal. The one thing Matthew tells us Jesus said that Luke leaves out is when Judas came up, yes, Jesus says, “Judas, do you betray me with a kiss?” He also said, “Friend, do what you came to do.” Friend. Friend! Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

3.5.1.2.1. One of the greatest sermons I’ve ever read is out of print. It’s very old. It’s a sermon written by M’Cheyne, a Scottish Presbyterian minister, years ago on John 13, and the name of it is called Melting the Betrayer. He points out if you read everything Jesus does in John 13, why does he keep saying, “Somebody will betray me”? Why doesn’t he say, “You”? He says, “Somebody will betray me.” Why, when Judas actually comes up, does he say, “Judas, do you betray me with a kiss?” What kind of question is that? That’s not a question for information for Jesus. That’s a counseling question. In Jesus Christ Superstar, the rock opera, there’s one place where Jesus says, “You Judas! You liar!” You never see Jesus talking like this to Judas. Never! He calls him, “Friend,” and he asks him a question. He says, “Do you betray me with a kiss?” That’s not trying to get information to Jesus. It’s trying to get information to Judas. He’s trying to say, “Judas, do you know what you’re doing? Do you see? Do you realize with a kiss you betray the Son of Man?” He’s reaching out even to Judas. He’s reaching out. He doesn’t say, “Well, maybe when they repent, I might show them love.” Oh, no. The love comes and enables the repentance. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

3.5.1.3. Will he have you? The only reason your heart is melting is because the blowtorch of his love is on it. He doesn’t say, “If you come to me, then I’ll kiss you.” He’s kissing you now, or you wouldn’t even be thinking about it. He reaches out. He says, “Friend.” He doesn’t say, “Simon.” Remember, he says, “Simon, Simon …” Remember, in the Hebrew, in the old Semitic, the way in which you expressed intensity of emotion and love was not just to say, “Simon.” Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

3.5.2. The work of Jesus

3.5.2.1. I downloaded the latest The Lord of the Rings movie trailer. There’s an interesting place. The hero of The Lord of the Rings is a little hobbit named Frodo. He’s played by Elijah Wood in the movie coming up. He’s a little guy. Right? There’s one place in the trailer where the great elf queen Galadriel, played by Cate Blanchett by the way, looks down at him and says something that’s not in The Lord of the Rings book. Tolkien did not write it. She looks down and says, “Even the smallest person can change the course of the future.” That’s very 1960s. That’s very, “Do you know what? It doesn’t matter who you are, but if you try hard enough, you may not have any legs, you may not have any feet, but you can run the New York Marathon. If you really try hard enough …” It’s very 60s. “Anybody can do anything they want.” I’m sure Tolkien would never have said that. I don’t think he would’ve said it. It doesn’t mean I’m not going to look forward to the movie. I just don’t think he would’ve said that. Here’s what he would have her saying, not, “Even the smallest person can change the course of the future.” Tolkien was a Christian. Tolkien was soaked in the gospel, and it actually comes out in the book, because what she would’ve said is, “Only the smallest person can change the course of the future.” Tolkien sets up his book so the only person who can actually overcome the evil force that’s threatening the whole world is not a great person, not a big person, not a powerful person, but a little person, a weak person, a person who is going to be overlooked, because he understood the gospel, that the way up now is down. The way to gain power is to give away power. The way to rule is to serve. The way to change the world, the way to change civilization is the way Jesus did, which is give yourself completely to serve other people, even though you may get it in the neck. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

4. misc

4.1. ILLUSTERATIONS

4.2. Passover

4.2.1. The celebration of appointed times reminded Israel of its inheritance. Passover commemorated the liberation of the nation from Egypt, when God sent a plague that took the lives of the Egyptians’ firstborn. The Israelites were spared by dabbing their doorways with the blood of a slaughtered lamb. Many in Jesus’ day saw this first deliverance as the model for their final liberation. Pilgrims came to commemorate this event filled with hopes and expectations that the Messiah would eventually come to deliver Israel from foreign oppression and economic misery during the night of Passover. 2 Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 514). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.2.2. It was a particularly nervous time for the high priests and their police force since the chance for an outbreak of riots increased dramatically during this time. The Roman governor usually moved to Jerusalem from his headquarters in Caesarea on the Mediterranean coast to monitor the volatile mobs of fervent pilgrims. The slightest provocation could set them off, and Josephus duly records the disturbances that broke out during a Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 514). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.2.2.1. Mark 14:2–3 (ESV) — 2 for they said, “Not during the feast, lest there be an uproar from the people.” 3 And while he was at Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he was reclining at table, a woman came with an alabaster flask of ointment of pure nard, very costly, and she broke the flask and poured it over his head.

4.2.3. On the eve of Passover, 14 Nisan, work normally ceased at noon and the ritual slaughter of the Passover lambs began around 3: 00 P.M. as the heads of the household brought their animals the temple (see Jub. 49: 10– 12). The priests sprinkled the blood against the base of the altar and offered the fat on the altar. The only stipulation was that the lamb had to be eaten in Jerusalem, whose borders were expanded to accommodate the crowds. Worshipers returned to their homes or wherever they could find a nook or a cranny to spit the lamb on a stick for the late evening meal. This took place in the evening (after sunset) on 15 Nisan, strictly speaking, the first day of Unleavened Bread. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 524). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.2.4. THE PASSOVER WAS not intended to be a gratifying memento of God’s past deliverance of Israel. The celebration was meant to place each generation in touch with that event and make it a present reality. It celebrates what “the Lord did for me” (cf. Ex. 13: 8– 9). Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 534). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.2.5. Passover

4.3. blog

4.3.1. Don't run from the doctrines of grace

4.3.1.1. The elect - God works not casually but directly towards

4.3.1.2. The many - God works for the many by pouring out his life. This is the work of definite atonement.

4.3.1.2.1. Sometimes when you go to the doctor, you get  prescription that is generic. Some medicine work that way. But that's not how medicine works. The doctor checks you out, finds out your problem and gives you something for it specifically. And ex. throid - for you, your measure.

4.3.1.2.2. So Christ comes to "pay a ransom for many"

4.3.1.2.3. And now, blood poured out for many

4.3.1.2.4. Jesus firmly believed that his death was not a stroke of fate but that its purpose lay deep within the providence of God. He viewed this death as a representative death for the many. It was something that they were unable to supply for themselves but which he supplies for them, standing alone in the breach. He views his death positively, as part of his vocation, and connects it closely with the kingdom of God, which brings salvation to humans. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 533). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

5. INTRODUCTION

5.1. ILL: Who is Judas

5.1.1. Images pick him out

5.1.2. Summary: Traits

5.1.2.1. In the shadow

5.1.2.2. Beady eyes

5.1.2.3. By himself

5.1.2.4. No halo

5.1.2.5. NOt looking at Christ

5.1.3. if only it was that easy, right?

5.2. The complexity of Mark

5.2.1. Last week so easy, clarity in good guy bad guy

5.2.1.1. We like that. We can easily pick. No problem

5.2.2. But this week not so easy

5.2.2.1. Is it I?

5.2.2.2. All will forsake me

5.3. This is what we are confronted with

5.3.1. That we are no so much Judas. But we are

6. communion

6.1. Calvins quote

6.2. Participate

7. CONNECTION

7.1. Connection to text

7.2. Title

7.2.1. What Does Jesus Do With Our Failures?

8. #1 - He's Honest About Them

8.1. Note what he does

8.1.1. Jesus brings forth teh question they were not going to ask - IS IT I?

8.1.1.1. Note the inclusive language

8.1.1.2. Note the invitation

8.1.1.2.1. Setting the scene

8.1.1.3. Note the occasion - family

8.1.1.4. The universal rejection of Christ

8.1.1.4.1. Is it i?

8.1.1.4.2. Artistic paintings

8.1.1.4.3. One of you will betray me (v17-21)

8.1.1.4.4. v21

8.1.1.4.5. But here this chapter is difficult, because who will abandon christ is all

8.1.2. Truth about Judas (vs 20 & 21)

8.1.3. Treachurious because even the best might fall

8.1.3.1. Peter

8.1.3.2. Note Mark 8 -

8.1.3.3. He's the leader to marks audiene

8.1.3.3.1. early church

8.1.3.3.2. bishop in Rome

8.1.3.3.3. gave his life

8.1.3.4. Note his confidence

8.1.3.4.1. v 29

8.1.3.4.2. his judgement on others

8.1.3.4.3. his separation

8.1.3.5. The betrayal of Peter

8.1.3.5.1. And what is more, the leader of the church (likely at Marks time) - and if mark is to christians in Rome, especially important as Peter likely lead that congregation for a time Exposit v26-31

8.1.3.5.2. All of you will betray me (v26-31)

8.1.3.6. But note the totality of his abandonment (30)

8.1.3.6.1. Not just scatter, but deny

8.1.3.6.2. 3 times - not moments of weakness, but decisive disassociatation

8.2. Application

8.2.1. Some of the deepest changes in our lives is when we see our lives as it is!

8.2.2. Is God showing your your life?

8.3. Transition

8.3.1. Not automatic. Seeing sin does not heal us. Does not change us. It might actually destroy us in despair.

8.3.2. Judas!

8.3.2.1. Misses it here

8.3.2.2. Later will see it and run and hang himself

8.3.3. Peter

8.3.3.1. He will weep!

8.3.3.2. But he will run to christ

8.3.4. Why? What good is Jesus with our failures?