Vernacular Architecture of Asia: What is it? How does it work? What can we do for it?

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Vernacular Architecture of Asia: What is it? How does it work? What can we do for it? by Mind Map: Vernacular Architecture of Asia: What is it? How does it work? What can we do for it?

1. How can we face changing?

2. V and Modern

3. What is the Value?

4. The Concept of Time/Media in VA

5. Level of Meaning (Value)

5.1. Low Level

5.2. Middle Level

5.3. High Level

5.4. Indigenous Issue

5.5. Non-space

5.6. Relations between 1 2 3

6. 1. VA as a Continuing Process

6.1. Changing & Adaptation

6.1.1. Response towards Environmental Limits

6.1.2. Authenticity

6.2. Traditional Expertise Engagement

6.2.1. Localized Craftmanship

6.3. Space & Time

6.4. Original: Particular Time, Location & Group of People

7. 2. People, Culture

7.1. Relationship & Media

7.2. Three Levels of Meaning

7.2.1. Low: Everyday need & Instrumental/functional

7.2.2. Middle: Community & Identity & Power, Status, Wealth

7.2.3. High: Cosmos, World, Philosophy, Human - Nature

7.3. Boundry or Relations of Levels Meaning

7.3.1. Changing - Transformation - Vanish

7.3.2. Time

7.3.3. Human Engagement

7.4. Indentity

7.5. T. S. Eliot

7.5.1. Tradition cannot be inherited, and if you want it, you must obtain it by great labour

8. Short Terms

8.1. VA: Vernacular Architecture

8.2. V: Vernacular

9. 3. Climate

9.1. VA as Response & Relfection

9.1.1. Basic Need (Shelter)

9.1.2. Typology in Cifferent Regions

9.1.3. Materiality

9.1.4. Cultural Context

9.1.5. Geographic Conditions

9.1.6. Sharing Forms

9.1.6.1. Japanese Shoji - Paper Windows

9.1.6.1.1. Recycles - Conserve - Relation with Nature

10. 4. Materials, Construction

10.1. Cultural

10.1.1. Globalization - Regionalism

10.1.2. Scales of Design

10.2. Spiritual

10.2.1. Belief of Nature - Communication - Transmigration

10.3. Materiality

10.3.1. Natural or Manufactured? (production process or chemical process)

10.3.2. Bricks - Manufactured

11. 5. V Landscapes

11.1. Public - Private (Property)

11.2. Urban - Rural (Context)

11.3. Sense of Place (Intellectual Meaning & Quality)

11.4. Man-made - Natural

11.4.1. Criteria & Transformation (existence)

11.4.2. Natural elements to Farmland or Garden (Non-professional Transformation)

11.4.3. Unit: Single - Group - Community - Society

11.5. Fengshui

11.5.1. Concept of Site Planning, Orientation and Scale

11.6. Time - Space

12. 6. Rural V

12.1. Why do we study Rural V?

12.1.1. Origin

12.2. Vernacular Setting and Its Relationship with Nature

12.3. Ideas for Urban Environment

12.4. Conservation of Traditions

12.4.1. Time

12.4.2. Returned Generations

12.5. Urbanization Forces and Changing

12.5.1. Better Life - Modern Life

12.5.2. Rapid Change - Population

12.5.3. Source of Wealth and Trigger

12.6. Context in Different Countries

12.7. self-conscious or un-

12.7.1. Christopher Alexander (1965) and Amos Rapaport (1969) argues that vernacular built-form is the most obvious and direct means of expression of a people and its culture, without having to go through a self-conscious process of thinking. C. Norberg-Schulz (1975) thinks otherwise. Is the vernacular process a self-conscious or an unself-conscious one?

13. 7. Urban V

13.1. Difference Between Urban & Rural

13.1.1. What is city?

13.2. Colonialism

13.2.1. Culture - Economy & Politics

13.2.2. Building Typology - Localization

13.2.2.1. Materials

13.2.2.2. Climate

13.2.3. Identity

13.2.3.1. Changing - History & Future

13.2.4. Hong Kong Context

13.2.5. Other Asian Country

13.3. Urbanization - Transformation

13.3.1. Rapic Process & Adaptation

13.3.2. Migration from Rural to Urban

13.4. Concentration of Population - Sources

13.4.1. Advantages

13.4.2. Disadbantages

13.5. Communication Way Comparing in Village - Community Life to Numbers

13.6. Trourists

13.6.1. Contributions & Forces

13.6.2. Shop Houses

13.7. City as a Cultural Milieu

13.7.1. Hierachy System

13.7.2. The Reflection of Cultural Diversity

13.7.2.1. People

13.7.3. Three Levels of Meaning

13.7.3.1. The expression of Meaning

13.7.4. Multiple Layers of Culture

13.7.4.1. Representation

13.7.5. Tangible & Intangible

13.7.6. Urban Deversity

14. 8. Informal Settlements

14.1. Formal & Informal

14.1.1. Process - Individual Choice/Development

14.1.2. Desire and Status

14.2. Informal Settlement

14.2.1. Informal Materials

14.2.2. Reason: War, Migration, Rapid Economy Develpment

14.2.3. Life Styles

14.2.4. Social Concerns

14.2.5. Piecemeal Fashion

14.2.6. Problem: Infrastructure, Safety, Health, Education, Property

14.2.7. Community - Business - Respect

14.2.8. Ownership Issue: Renting

14.2.9. Regulation and Legal Control

14.3. Location

14.3.1. Village

14.3.2. Urban Outskirt

14.3.3. Urban Village

14.3.4. Street - Deadend

14.3.5. Rooftop

14.3.6. Boat

14.3.7. River

15. 9. Architectural Conservation of Built V Heritage

15.1. Preservation & Conservation

15.1.1. Differences

15.2. Role of Architecture: As Medium

15.3. Activities and Alternative Activites

15.4. Continuity of Story - Sense and Existence of Place

15.5. Heritage/Relic to Live Place - New Community (Regeneration - Reactivate)

15.6. Multiple Disciplinary Engagement - Public Engagement

15.6.1. Hong Kong Context

15.7. Tangible and Intangible Value - Sustainability

15.8. Architectural/Cultural Value & Economical Value

15.9. Level of Meanings

16. 10. The Future of Asia's VA

16.1. Aspects of Sustainability

16.2. Identity: Single - Local - Regional - National

16.3. Cultural Sustainablity

16.4. Tradition (Process - Production)

16.4.1. on-going

16.5. Time - Generations - Understanding

17. HKU ARCH_5107_7161 Vernacular Architecture of Asia

18. Historical View

18.1. What is history?

19. The Meaning of V in Classical Context and Contemporary Context

20. ICOMOS Defination

20.1. http://www.icomos.org/charters/vernacular_e.pdf