Create your own awesome maps

Even on the go

with our free apps for iPhone, iPad and Android

Get Started

Already have an account?
Log In

Hāmākua CDP by Mind Map: Hāmākua CDP
0.0 stars - reviews range from 0 to 5

Hāmākua CDP

Vision Values

VALUES

COMMUNITY/OHANA (community, aloha, education, ohana, heritage, cultural and ethnic diversity)

AINA (natural  beauty,  viewplanes,   natural  resources,  shoreline,  weather,  open  space,  environmental   quality)

COUNTRY/RURAL  LIFESTYLE  (rural/small  town,  agriculture,   peace  and  quiet,  lifestyle,  no  traffic,  controlled  development,   sports  and  outdoor  recreation)

Goals (key issues & priorities)

LOCAL ECONOMY (economically and environmentally sustainable agriculture, local business, jobs, retail, services, dining, renewable energy, housing)

RECREATION (parks & gathering spaces, facilities, programs, youth recreation, outdoor recreation)

EDUCATION (improved schools, quality education, adult/vocational/higher education)

HEALTH CARE (hospital/clinic, elderly care, more medical professionals, social services)

AINA (natural resources, land use, public access, environmental quality, natural beauty, sustainability)

PUBLIC SERVICES (transportation, roadways, mass transit, public utilities, protective services)

SWOT Analysis (Asset Mapping)

Assets

Challenges

Missed Linkages

Aggregators—clusters of farms (encourage diversity of small farms for resiliency and expanded opportunities—“thousand points of green”), 1. Affordable, flexible access to land, 2. Centralized washing, storage, packaging, distribution, 3. Coordinated crop selection and marketing—master farmer, cooperative or other collaborative business structure (e.g., 501(c)(6)), 4. Affordable access to water and energy, 5. Technical support, as required, 6. Access to mini-loans, as required

Strategies (Program Framework)

Strategy Icons Key

Notes from June 9-10 Meeting

Roy's Pre-Meeting Integrated Strategies

Mauna Kea Watershed Management Plan

Where do we want to be 20 years from now?

Environmental Health

Ag Productivity

Economic Condition

Heritage/Scenic-Preservation, interpretation

Sense of Ownership, Building on Assets/Identity and community capacity

Directed/balanced growth

Transportation

Open space network

Self-sufficiency/rural lifestyle

Education, health, recreation, housing

Environmental Health

Objective: Disaster resilience., 1. Encourage post-&-pier retrofits (see enhanced CERT), 2. Enhanced CERT, 1. Basic role and responsibilities to assist first responders, 2. Directory of resources and needs (Lorraine—Pepe‘ekeō model), 3. Retrofit—education; technical assistance; bulk material purchasing; coordinated communal construction, 4. Shelter—evacuation assistance; manpower assistance at shelter

Economic Development

Right Food

Complete Communities, Cornerstones of Community, Food, Knowledge, Knowledge Sharing, Knowledge Development, Visitors, Land water issues, How do you encourage clusters of farmers, Are there opportunities to slow down traffic, Network of support, Exchanges, Facilities, Encourage the siting of farm locations to improve interaction, Look for synergies, i.e. anerobic digesters, Energy, Wellness, Health, Entrepreneurial Economy, How do you support, Issues of capacity, Technical support, Technical training, ID of opportunities, Partnerships, i.e. farmers and ranchers, Lightning rod opportunities, get critical mass for funding and marketing, Rural Innovations Network, Asset Building, Support up's and down's, Credit Unions that provide support, HDRC and R&D can place a critical role, Need to know what's on the ground, Map of farms and resources, Existing nodes and networks, Resource: Ho'owaiwai Hawai'i Island: Building Genuine Wealth: Hawai'i Dept of R&D, May 2011, Financial Assets - income, savings and investments in form of bills, coins, EBTs, shares, bonds, and business equity, Human (intellectual) Assets - gifts, skills, knowledge, and capabilities of local residents, Built (physical) Assets - infrastructure, housing, goods, and materials, Social Assets - networks, groups, and institutions, Ecological Assets - ecosystem services and resources - foundation for all life, Mushroom Circle Metaphor: Hidden in the soil is a huge network of threadlike mycelia, Examples elsewhere so do not need to reinvent the wheel, Identify the right people to develop network, ex of Hāmākua Harvest, Learning and exchanging, People connect to solutions, Rural areas have unique opportunity to innovate and preserve sustainability components that get lost with urbanizing, Connections to, Hilo, P-Bark, ASNAP, University, Private Partners, How Sustainability aspect happens, Asset mapping, Jeff's work on Food and Agriculture, Jane: have done mapping, Capacity building assessment, HHCDC could play this role of capacity building, Submit application for funding - Island Innovation Fund, Use this a way to organize, Slow movement, slow food

Build the frame, Auth of planning, Auth of county, Vision Values, Broader implications of a broader approach, Values based, Beyond the CDP, Specific action projects vetted through community, Link to other agency resources and programs like Health and Wellness, What are the benefits and negatives of this project, What the CDP should do, Brad on steering committee: essence of transition, Ag at foundation, Potential of growth and transitions

Objective: Diverse, appropriately-scaled economic base to supplement and complement agriculture, Town revitalization plans + infrastructure financing (e.g., innovative financing for water and wastewater to enable the planned growth, Heritage Corridor and Hubs and Links map, Designation as Scenic Byway (Heritage Corridor Plan), Create the “story”, Regional brand—distinguish and synergize diverse elements of economy, Health & wellness—fresh; encourage natural farming/organic; nutritional completeness (food pyramid), Quality control—alternative food safety standards, Environmentally responsible, Tradition—part of the “story”, Slow food, slow travel, slow lifestyle

Objective: Appropriate eco-tourism—regional brand certification (pre-approval to show community support when applying for permit); permit criteria, Mitigated environmental impact (e.g., no impact to natural beauty sites), Mitigated community impact (e.g., traffic, noise impacts), Employment/education opportunities to residents

Objective: Communication—wireless coverage

Community

Objective: Affordable housing. Range of housing choices for existing residents and labor force., 1. Homeownership, 1. Fee simple (market appreciation)., 1. First-time buyer programs, 1. County program for buyer preparation—financial planning, credit cleanup, equity buildup, 2. Hula Mae financing, 2. Supply—inclusionary + incentives (subdivision), 1. Expandable starter homes, 2. Cottage cluster model, 2. Land trust (perpetual affordability). Dedicate remaining assets of Hāmākua Housing Corporation to land trust and rentals., 2. Rental, 1. Rental subsidy—check w/ OHCD that no impediments, 2. Employer assistance programs—helping employers find housing for workers; employers helping employees with rental assistance (e.g., guarantee to landlords), 3. County landlord property tax credits

Objective: Elderly support. Age in place, 1. Activities (e.g., day care)—resource for menial jobs, volunteer roles, education, guides, 2. Meals, 3. Home healthcare, 4. Transportation, 5. Financial planning and assistance, 6. Housing—range of choices, 1. Licensed homes, 2. Long-term care institutions—assisted living to skilled nursing

Objective: Disaster resilience., 1. Encourage post-&-pier retrofits (see enhanced CERT), 2. Enhanced CERT, 1. Basic role and responsibilities to assist first responders, 2. Directory of resources and needs (Lorraine—Pepe‘ekeō model), 3. Retrofit—education; technical assistance; bulk material purchasing; coordinated communal construction, 4. Shelter—evacuation assistance; manpower assistance at shelter

Objective: Community-supported public facilities. In lieu of the community having to wait indefinitely for fixes and desired programs:, 1. County parks. There are three levels of community involvement to upgrade the facility and participate in programs:, 1. Exclusive community control and capital improvements with no county assistance—lease, 2. Non-exclusive community control and county-approved capital improvements; county assistance with maintenance or other negotiated arrangements—partnership agreement, 3. County control; community assistance with maintenance including capital improvements—Friends of the Park program, 2. Joint use of schools. Encourage give (mentorship, kupuna) and take, 1. Continuing education (after-school programs), 2. Community center functions (e.g., meetings, socials), 3. Recreation facilities (e.g., fields, gyms), 4. School-community gardens

Objective: Affordable housing. Range of housing choices for existing residents and labor force., 1. Homeownership, 1. Fee simple (market appreciation)., 1. First-time buyer programs, 1. County program for buyer preparation—financial planning, credit cleanup, equity buildup, 2. Hula Mae financing, 2. Supply—inclusionary + incentives (subdivision), 1. Expandable starter homes, 2. Cottage cluster model, 2. Land trust (perpetual affordability). Dedicate remaining assets of Hāmākua Housing Corporation to land trust and rentals., 2. Rental, 1. Rental subsidy—check w/ OHCD that no impediments, 2. Employer assistance programs—helping employers find housing for workers; employers helping employees with rental assistance (e.g., guarantee to landlords), 3. County landlord property tax credits

Objective: Access to primary healthcare., 1. Hāmākua medical clinic support, 2. Mobile clinics (e.g., dental)

Objective: Preserve the “story”, 1. Heritage corridor linkages, 2. Waipi‘o Valley wahi pana, 3. Plantation camp farmer’s market

Objective: Communication—wireless coverage

Watershed Mngt

Tie in with Mauna Kea Watershed Alliance, Management Goal 1: Protect ground and surface water resources., Objective 1A: Protect, enhance, and monitor high-yield watershed areas to maintain water quantity and quality., Objective 1B: Support appropriate water development to meet the needs of future water demand., Management Goal 2: Protect and enhance native terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and their biodiversity and species., Objective 2A: Maintain and/or restore native forest cover., Objective 2B: Protect and recover rare species. Objective 2C: Protect and enhance riparian buffers to protect stream corridors., Management Goal 3: Manage non-native plant and animal species within appropriate areas to reduce the impacts to native ecosystems and species., Objective 3A: Strategically manage feral ungulate damage in high priority native ecosystems and watersheds while providing for increased hunting opportunities in designated areas., Objective 3B: Strategically manage other pest species that threaten native ecosystems., Objective 3C: Strategically control invasive plants to protect high quality native ecosystems and endangered species. Objective 3D: Control priority invasive aquatic species in windward streams on Mauna Kea., Management Goal 4: Prevent and minimize wildfires on Mauna Kea., Objective 4A: Install on-the-ground fuel management measures intended to reduce the number and/or severity of fires., Objective 4B: Reduce fuel loads in fire-prone areas, ensuring compatibility with other habitat and watershed protection goals., Objective 4C: Develop water sources for fire-fighting purposes in fire-prone areas., Objective 4D: Coordinate pre-suppression planning and fire response protocols among landowners., Objective 4E: Promote effective communication and public safety during extreme fire weather and during fire-response events., Objective 4F: Manage access to fire-prone areas during extreme fire danger weather., Objective 4G: Promote post-fire assessment and restoration of burned areas., Management Goal 5: Promote and encourage economic sustainability in balance with habitat and watershed protection goals., Objective 5A: Encourage permitted ecotourism, well-managed wilderness experiences, and other forms of managed access, as appropriate and permissible, on public and private lands. Objective, 5B: Manage future development to ensure it will not have a detrimental impact on the ecosystems of Mauna Kea., Objective 5C: Support sustainable uses of the land in balance with habitat and watershed protection goals., Management Goal 6: Manage human activities in the watershed to promote recreational and subsistence opportunities that are compatible with habitat and watershed protection goals., Objective 6A: Create and encourage safe and appropriate patterns of access for hiking and recreation on public lands., Objective 6B: Continue support of hunting on appropriate lands, where compatible with watershed protection goals and applicable laws., Objective 6C: Maintain and secure Keanakolu-Mānā Road and Mauna Kea Summit Access Road to facilitate managed access., Management Goal 7: Protect the cultural landscape and historical resources of Mauna Kea., Objective 7A: Ensure that archaeological and other cultural sites within the MKWA area are identified and protected., Objective 7B: Provide opportunities for cultural practices that are compatible with habitat and watershed protection goals., Objective 7C: Promote awareness of Mauna Kea as an important cultural resource., Management Goal 8: Enhance community awareness and support of watershed values, resources, and management activities on Mauna Kea., Objective 8A: Develop and implement education and outreach programs for community members, landowners, and other stakeholders., Objective 8B: Provide on-the-ground service learning opportunities for school children and community members., Management Goal 9: Promote and facilitate research opportunities that will enhance the management of Mauna Kea’s resources., Objective 9A: Monitor long-term trends in watershed health and water quality., Objective 9B: Assess the success of management actions to accomplish habitat and watershed management goals and provide direction for future actions., Objective 9C: Support research to help guide new and innovative uses of the land that will sustain economic activities while protecting habitat and watershed values., Management Goal 10: Provide effective administrative coordination, infrastructure, and enforcement., Objective 10A: Promote and support the enforcement of existing laws and rules to ensure public safety and prevent unregulated and illegal land and resource uses., Objective 10B: Provide and maintain the appropriate infrastructure and administration to allow for effective watershed management and coordination of activities between Mauna Kea Watershed Alliance members.

Objective: To live in harmony with the land, Watershed health, Management measures, Permanent BMPs as part of town/villages and working lands—facilitated NPDES and conservation plans if locating in proper areas, Regional brand certification—require compliance with management measures to qualify for regional branding, Monitoring and adaptive management—HHCDC role as community partner w/ DOH

Additional Brainstorming During June 9 Meeting, Image, brand, and vision outputs on natural resources touch on everything we do., Translate into ecosystem services, Other simultaneous efforts, EPA and Department of Health, Development of Watershed plans, One produced several years ago for Hilo Bay, Allows for development of Watershed plans, Would the county want to apply for additional money for watershed plans, If want EPA 319 funding for implementation of Management Measures, If part of the CDP would have more teeth, Relation to other issues, Connections to Econ Development, Access, Carbon Credits, Inventory and assessment, Silva-pastoral management, Trees with stock grazing underneath, Best practices tied to land use, Conservation Resource Plans, Limited number of Conservation Resource Plans so good to determine where to target, Invasive species, Fire Ant, Pig, Coqui, Disincentives, Myconia, Win-wins, Look at native forest areas and whether already projected, How much overlap with soil conservation? Agricultural issues?, If want to apply for EPA funding, need to comply with watershed strategies, Often people lacking to implement components

Agriculture

Classification system, General Plan, State Prime Land, LSB B Lands

Agricultural irrigation systems—incentive support to farm clusters + IAL, 1. Community Facility Districts (CFD) or Improvement Districts (ID)—USDA Rural Development loan/grant programs 2. CIP priorities—leverage CDIP funds as matching funds for CFD/ID to attain debt:value requirements

Objectives: Viable agriculture for food, rural character, bioenergy, Food, Aggregators—clusters of farms (encourage diversity of small farms for resiliency and expanded opportunities—“thousand points of green”), 1. Affordable, flexible access to land, 2. Centralized washing, storage, packaging, distribution, 3. Coordinated crop selection and marketing—master farmer, cooperative or other collaborative business structure (e.g., 501(c)(6)), 4. Affordable access to water and energy, 5. Technical support, as required, 6. Access to mini-loans, as required, Market diversity based on quality levels, Export: Best, consistent quality; food safety standards, Local markets: Good quality; health standards, Farmers markets & roadside stands (manned, consignment (manned by another), unmanned (honor system): off-grade and surplus; larger backyard farmers; facilitated Special Permit, Grass-fed beef—more profit to raise and slaughter locally than shipping to mainland, Affordable irrigation, Finish pasture in vicinity of slaughterhouse, Industrial zoning for slaughterhouse/energy, Ag Processing, Synergistic coupling with anaerobic energy production, Replicate AceNet, Facility, Technical support, Financing, Marketing, High-end niche—export, Packaged food—state + procurement, Ag tourism—supplement income; market promotion, Along Heritage Corridor, 2. Regional Brand certification to meet standards—facilitated Plan Approval or Special Permit, Education—connection to soil and food, interest and inspiration to farm, appreciation of fresh food (compared to fast food), sustainable labor source, want and able to stay, Backyard self-sufficiency [part of rural character, Chickens policy (e.g., no roosters, confinement, odor control), Sharing knowledge—growing (e.g., natural farming, aquaponics), preserving, cooking, Timber—distinguish fast-growing (clear-cutting; energy, lumber) vs. hardwoods (craft); use of vast acreage in excess of food requirements; land banking land source should food needs require more land; energy source (electricity or fuel); carbon sequestration positioned for trading; open space, Sustainable management and harvesting (watershed management measures), Part of restoration options as silvo-pastoral practices, Location controls—viewplanes; wildfire buffer, Highway pullouts for trucks

Water

Objective: County water systems, 1. Allocation policies support growth policies—encourage infill; discourage sprawl, 2. Source capacity consistent with growth boundary

Objective: Agricultural irrigation systems—incentive support to farm clusters + IAL, 1. Community Facility Districts (CFD) or Improvement Districts (ID)—USDA Rural Development loan/grant programs, 2. CIP priorities—leverage CDIP funds as matching funds for CFD/ID to attain debt:value requirements

Land Use and Transportation

How do we prevent sprawl going into non-prime agricultural lands, Example of non-prime land, Land sold into 20-40 acre lots, Discourage further changes in zoning, Don't allow further subdivisions, Homesteads - created before statehood, to get people on the land, homesteads, need to be better understood and regulated, example of loophole, old flume going through the acreage, because no easement able to subdivide with flume as line to divide into 3 lots, another example of sugar plantation where they tried to argue that the small lots, some don't have good roads, roads in limbo, data questionable, anybody can buy them, Hakalau, has water main, is this part of the affordable housing policy?, Change GP designation of 20 acre or greater ag land, must get approved by State Land Commission, Conversion to Rural at the edge of a village, Would help with these small towns with edge room but not much infill develop, Jason found less than 20K RS within town., Public Access, Dividing into 3 different maps, Community Management Map, Fishing and hunting areas that require some sort of agreement with private owner, Organization that could help foster these agreements, HHCDC, Sub-regional levels, Day to day mngt of who gets access would control this, Respect the landowners, with the privilegecomes accountability and responsibility, Mechanism to carry insurance, Smart card system with cellular phone access, slide the smart card, Problem right now is that everyone is anonymous, Create template for what it would look like, Develop pilot example, Publically known access spots, If it appeared in tourist literature or website, okay, Need to check back with the community, however, includes scenic corridors, Untitled, Community Desired Assess Points - Map with, things that would not show up on a public map but would be could for the planning department aware, KayKayPoMao (sp??) Fishing Association, Have been trying to set up a management system with Fishing community and homeowners, Been encountering problems of enforcement for some time, Would be good to arrive with a pilot project to show how community management public access might be possible, Bob: education/culture based approaches possible, community managed system, master non-profit to manage groups, As soon as you charge money, need to figure out insurance, County is unwilling to do it, But need to community managed, Have it in the library but people would need to go to the library to see it, When you collect the information, public needs to know the process, Unfettered access for 120 years, 1994 all changed with change of sugar plantation shift, Vehicular and pedestrian access, Test of acceptability, Economic Development

Objective: To live in harmony with the land, Land Use context, Areas to protect—manage, Areas to restore—incentives for multi-use, Growth areas—range of choices, Compact towns/villages, Industrial—redevelop selected former mill sites leveraging brownfield grants; establish a theme/vision for each site to compatibly integrate with surroundings, Rural, Edge transect of towns/villages, Homesteads, Countryside—control through county water allocation policies?, Areas for working lands, Prime food production potential lands—IAL, Existing pasture, timber, and other ag (e.g., ornamentals) lands, Hazard-susceptible areas (overlay? i.e., governed by underlying use designation with special construction requirements), Coastal bluff, Tsunami, Flood, Earthquake liquification soils

Objective: Roads, 1. Roads-in-limbo, 1. Gates—no physical problems except for gates, 2. Non-existent—paper road, 3. mis-located—exists but outside legal right-of-way, 4. Maintenance—not in County budget/list to maintain, 2. Bridge maintenance (non-highway) and hardening (highway), 3. Highway pullouts? (LOS trigger; pre-identified locations and concept)

Objective: Bus, 1. Commuter—route network connected to town/village park & rides, 2. Regional paratransit (on-demand) shuttle system

Sustainability

Objective: To live in harmony with the land, Land Use context, Areas to protect—manage, Areas to restore—incentives for multi-use, Growth areas—range of choices, Compact towns/villages, Industrial—redevelop selected former mill sites leveraging brownfield grants; establish a theme/vision for each site to compatibly integrate with surroundings, Rural, Edge transect of towns/villages, Homesteads, Countryside—control through county water allocation policies?, Areas for working lands, Prime food production potential lands—IAL, Existing pasture, timber, and other ag (e.g., ornamentals) lands, Hazard-susceptible areas (overlay? i.e., governed by underlying use designation with special construction requirements), Coastal bluff, Tsunami, Flood, Earthquake liquification soils, Watershed health, Management measures, Permanent BMPs as part of town/villages and working lands—facilitated NPDES and conservation plans if locating in proper areas, Regional brand certification—require compliance with management measures to qualify for regional branding, Monitoring and adaptive management—HHCDC role as community partner w/ DOH

Objective: Solid waste, 1. zero waste for organics; used for compost, feed, and/or energy to reduce ag input costs (PBARC plan);, 2. reuse and recycle—Laupahoehoe Transfer Station as model

Objective: Energy—renewable sources + decentralized network

Public Access

Objective: Expanded responsible access for outdoor activities (e.g., fishing, hunting, hiking, surfing), 1. Community-managed public access, 1. Nonprofit manager, 1. One-point accountability, 2. Carries insurance, 3. Educates and controls who accesses, 4. Manages access control system, 2. Agreement between landowner and nonprofit, 1. Public land—stewardship agreement, 2. Private land—access agreement, 3. Identified person who accesses, 1. High-tech—smart card, 2. Low-tech—token + manual counter, 2. Hunting/hiking to public forest reserves, 1. Continuous access from highway to trailhead, 2. Proper trailhead signage to know start of trail and parking

Build an image/campaign

Regional Brand

Relationship of brand to CDP, Richard Haw: Papaya processing guy doing alot of work, Check List for How to do it, Use brand to get into local markets, He tells his farmers how much to grow, Aggregatorconcept:, Check list, growing, Picking, washing, shipping, Utilize kitchens, Hubs and links map, Ag Coop, Value added, Higher end markets, How to promote the ag processing, example of slaughterhouse and anaerobic digesters, promoting synergies

Relationship to existing "brands"

How to qualify to use brand

Foster cooperation rather than compete

Images are self-fulfilling process, Images of Hāmākua, Waterfalls, Green open spaces, Small town settings, When it comes to ag: Not just Hāmākua, South Hilo is bulk of agriculture, Needs to be Hilo-Hāmākua, Water experiences, Access to the waterfall, Acceptable to the community, Tourism can = treading on sacred land, Tourism, Marketing for visitors needs to resonate with identity of area, Sacred places

Plan represents the system

ID gaps

Creating networks

Possible Themes

Green coast (spin-off of last big idea: Gold Coast)

Slow Food/Local Food

Capacity Building

Establish a usable decision making framework

Why a DM Framework?, Educational: better understanding of issues, Growth is happening, Antigrowth sentiment leads to antiplanning, but not planning is a strategy with undesirable consequences for all, Need framework to begin to have conversation, Most of the growth so far has been happening in ag land where sugar was, How we frame growth, very sensitive issue in Hāmākua, This presentation critical for conversation, How planning will help protect core community values, How strategies impact those values, Example Scenarios, Baseline, existing, Jeff Melrose with Planning Agency working with University of Hawaii, Grant from R&D, trends, Trend, Directed

Data

Indicators, linked to vision/values, Map it, Filter it, Evaluate it

Models, CommunityViz Analysis, Buildout, Variable for this analysis, Density, Minimum bldg separation (based on min width of sideyard), Placement: currently on a grid, random, and along a road), Efficiency, Suitability, Measure factors affecting suitability, Distance to Coastline, Distance to towns, How about distance to the highway?, Weight factors, Can use keypad polling for weighting, Can use experts, Factor together for score from 0-100, Timescope, 1.67% compounded annually, Time horizon 2035, Used spreadsheet on population projections, 2000 starting point?, Indicators, Think about uber indicators like Salmon count in PNW, Think about quality of life indicators and then potential proxies, Small town feel?, Number of stars can see on a clear night, HCDP Vision Statement Report, LOCAL  ECONOMY (economically  and  environmentally  sustainable   agriculture,  local  business,  jobs,  retail,  services,  dining,  renewable   energy,  housing)  , RECREATION  (parks  and  gathering  spaces,  facilities,  programs,   youth  recreation,  outdoor  recreation), EDUCATION  (improved  schools,  quality  education,   adult/vocational/higher  education), HEALTH  CARE  (hospital/clinic,  elderly  care,  more  medical   professionals,  social  services), AINA (natural  resources,  land  use,  public  access,  environmental   quality,  natural  beauty,  sustainability), PUBLIC  SERVICES  (transportation,  roadways,  mass  transit,   public  utilities,  protective  services), DHHL impact on area, Department of Hawaiian Homelands, Exempt from zoning, Plans for housing large, 20 acre lots, We have no say in what they do, Population projections should exclude them, Katie:Add infrastructure to determine where growth goes, Conclusion: Shrink to reasonable size the LUPEG designations, Decision Making Optimizer, Housing, Transportation, Economy, With older demographic important consideration, If trying to balance out demographics, Concept of aging and place

User Experience, Agency Decision Making, Design lab, Visualization, Indicators Dashboard, Online Communications, Face-to-face interactions, Stakeholder and public input, Design lab, Visualization, Indicators Dashboard, Online Communications, Face-to-face interactions

Iterative - Integratative - Value Added System

Technology Audit

Tool Acquisition

Tool Integration

Interagency coordination

Public and Stakeholder Involvement

Training

Implementation

Policy Making

Leverage land use mechanisms, identify necessary changes to General Plan, if any

Resource Expenditure

Resources to get things done

Restrictions on how money spent

Pilot Projects, Aggregators

Full scale programs

Partnerships and networking

Convening

CDP Process

Talk Story - Vision and Values

Form Steering Committee

Sub-regional workshops

Charrette

Toolkit development

Scenario development

Integrated Strategies (from Roy's pre-mtg doc)

Economy, Land Use, Environment—the regional framework

Objectives: Viable agriculture for food, rural character, bioenergy, Food, Aggregators—clusters of farms (encourage diversity of small farms for resiliency and expanded opportunities—“thousand points of green”), 1. Affordable, flexible access to land, 2. Centralized washing, storage, packaging, distribution, 3. Coordinated crop selection and marketing—master farmer, cooperative or other collaborative business structure (e.g., 501(c)(6)), 4. Affordable access to water and energy, 5. Technical support, as required, 6. Access to mini-loans, as required, Market diversity based on quality levels, Export: Best, consistent quality; food safety standards, Local markets: Good quality; health standards, Farmers markets & roadside stands (manned, consignment (manned by another), unmanned (honor system): off-grade and surplus; larger backyard farmers; facilitated Special Permit, Grass-fed beef—more profit to raise and slaughter locally than shipping to mainland, Affordable irrigation, Finish pasture in vicinity of slaughterhouse, Industrial zoning for slaughterhouse/energy, Ag Processing, Synergistic coupling with anaerobic energy production, Replicate AceNet, Facility, Technical support, Financing, Marketing, High-end niche—export, Packaged food—state + procurement, Ag tourism—supplement income; market promotion, Along Heritage Corridor, 2. Regional Brand certification to meet standards—facilitated Plan Approval or Special Permit, Education—connection to soil and food, interest and inspiration to farm, appreciation of fresh food (compared to fast food), sustainable labor source, want and able to stay, Backyard self-sufficiency [part of rural character, Chickens policy (e.g., no roosters, confinement, odor control), Sharing knowledge—growing (e.g., natural farming, aquaponics), preserving, cooking, Timber—distinguish fast-growing (clear-cutting; energy, lumber) vs. hardwoods (craft); use of vast acreage in excess of food requirements; land banking land source should food needs require more land; energy source (electricity or fuel); carbon sequestration positioned for trading; open space, Sustainable management and harvesting (watershed management measures), Part of restoration options as silvo-pastoral practices, Location controls—viewplanes; wildfire buffer, Highway pullouts for trucks

Objective: To live in harmony with the land, Land Use context, Areas to protect—manage, Areas to restore—incentives for multi-use, Growth areas—range of choices, Compact towns/villages, Industrial—redevelop selected former mill sites leveraging brownfield grants; establish a theme/vision for each site to compatibly integrate with surroundings, Rural, Edge transect of towns/villages, Homesteads, Countryside—control through county water allocation policies?, Areas for working lands, Prime food production potential lands—IAL, Existing pasture, timber, and other ag (e.g., ornamentals) lands, Hazard-susceptible areas (overlay? i.e., governed by underlying use designation with special construction requirements), Coastal bluff, Tsunami, Flood, Earthquake liquification soils, Watershed health, Management measures, Permanent BMPs as part of town/villages and working lands—facilitated NPDES and conservation plans if locating in proper areas, Regional brand certification—require compliance with management measures to qualify for regional branding, Monitoring and adaptive management—HHCDC role as community partner w/ DOH

Objective: Appropriate eco-tourism—regional brand certification (pre-approval to show community support when applying for permit); permit criteria, Mitigated environmental impact (e.g., no impact to natural beauty sites), Mitigated community impact (e.g., traffic, noise impacts), Employment/education opportunities to residents

Objective: Diverse, appropriately-scaled economic base to supplement and complement agriculture, Town revitalization plans + infrastructure financing (e.g., innovative financing for water and wastewater to enable the planned growth, Heritage Corridor and Hubs and Links map, Designation as Scenic Byway (Heritage Corridor Plan), Create the “story”, Regional brand—distinguish and synergize diverse elements of economy, Health & wellness—fresh; encourage natural farming/organic; nutritional completeness (food pyramid), Quality control—alternative food safety standards, Environmentally responsible, Tradition—part of the “story”, Slow food, slow travel, slow lifestyle

Community—strengthening the sense of community and preserving a rural lifestyle

Objective: Access to primary healthcare., 1. Hāmākua medical clinic support, 2. Mobile clinics (e.g., dental)

Objective: Expanded responsible access for outdoor activities (e.g., fishing, hunting, hiking, surfing), 1. Community-managed public access, 1. Nonprofit manager, 1. One-point accountability, 2. Carries insurance, 3. Educates and controls who accesses, 4. Manages access control system, 2. Agreement between landowner and nonprofit, 1. Public land—stewardship agreement, 2. Private land—access agreement, 3. Identified person who accesses, 1. High-tech—smart card, 2. Low-tech—token + manual counter, 2. Hunting/hiking to public forest reserves, 1. Continuous access from highway to trailhead, 2. Proper trailhead signage to know start of trail and parking

Objective: Community-supported public facilities. In lieu of the community having to wait indefinitely for fixes and desired programs:, 1. County parks. There are three levels of community involvement to upgrade the facility and participate in programs:, 1. Exclusive community control and capital improvements with no county assistance—lease, 2. Non-exclusive community control and county-approved capital improvements; county assistance with maintenance or other negotiated arrangements—partnership agreement, 3. County control; community assistance with maintenance including capital improvements—Friends of the Park program, 2. Joint use of schools. Encourage give (mentorship, kupuna) and take, 1. Continuing education (after-school programs), 2. Community center functions (e.g., meetings, socials), 3. Recreation facilities (e.g., fields, gyms), 4. School-community gardens

Objective: Affordable housing. Range of housing choices for existing residents and labor force., 1. Homeownership, 1. Fee simple (market appreciation)., 1. First-time buyer programs, 1. County program for buyer preparation—financial planning, credit cleanup, equity buildup, 2. Hula Mae financing, 2. Supply—inclusionary + incentives (subdivision), 1. Expandable starter homes, 2. Cottage cluster model, 2. Land trust (perpetual affordability). Dedicate remaining assets of Hāmākua Housing Corporation to land trust and rentals., 2. Rental, 1. Rental subsidy—check w/ OHCD that no impediments, 2. Employer assistance programs—helping employers find housing for workers; employers helping employees with rental assistance (e.g., guarantee to landlords), 3. County landlord property tax credits

Objective: Elderly support. Age in place, 1. Activities (e.g., day care)—resource for menial jobs, volunteer roles, education, guides, 2. Meals, 3. Home healthcare, 4. Transportation, 5. Financial planning and assistance, 6. Housing—range of choices, 1. Licensed homes, 2. Long-term care institutions—assisted living to skilled nursing

Objective: Disaster resilience., 1. Encourage post-&-pier retrofits (see enhanced CERT), 2. Enhanced CERT, 1. Basic role and responsibilities to assist first responders, 2. Directory of resources and needs (Lorraine—Pepe‘ekeō model), 3. Retrofit—education; technical assistance; bulk material purchasing; coordinated communal construction, 4. Shelter—evacuation assistance; manpower assistance at shelter

Objective: Preserve the “story”, 1. Heritage corridor linkages, 2. Waipi‘o Valley wahi pana, 3. Plantation camp farmer’s market

Infrastructure—priorities and financing alternatives

Objective: Solid waste, 1. zero waste for organics; used for compost, feed, and/or energy to reduce ag input costs (PBARC plan);, 2. reuse and recycle—Laupahoehoe Transfer Station as model

Objective: Roads, 1. Roads-in-limbo, 1. Gates—no physical problems except for gates, 2. Non-existent—paper road, 3. mis-located—exists but outside legal right-of-way, 4. Maintenance—not in County budget/list to maintain, 2. Bridge maintenance (non-highway) and hardening (highway), 3. Highway pullouts? (LOS trigger; pre-identified locations and concept)

Objective: Bus, 1. Commuter—route network connected to town/village park & rides, 2. Regional paratransit (on-demand) shuttle system

Objective: County water systems, 1. Allocation policies support growth policies—encourage infill; discourage sprawl, 2. Source capacity consistent with growth boundary

Objective: Agricultural irrigation systems—incentive support to farm clusters + IAL, 1. Community Facility Districts (CFD) or Improvement Districts (ID)—USDA Rural Development loan/grant programs, 2. CIP priorities—leverage CDIP funds as matching funds for CFD/ID to attain debt:value requirements

Objective: County CIP—Laupahoehoe Boat Ramp

Objective: Energy—renewable sources + decentralized network

Objective: Communication—wireless coverage

Draft Strategies and Recommendations

Strategies Matrix

Ecosystem Based Management Integration

Link to Mauna Kea Watershed Plan

Regional Workshop

Imaging and branding

Online resources

Plan Adoption