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the environment? by Mind Map: the environment?
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the environment?

Topic covering ecosystems and air and atmosphere. 4.10     ecosystems a)   describe some adaptations of living things to factors in their environment b)   describe, using examples of food chains and food webs from Australian ecosystems, how producers, consumers and decomposers are related c)  describe the roles of photosynthesis and respiration in ecosystems d)  discuss some effects of bushfires, drought and flood on Australian ecosystems. 4.9.4    the atmosphere a)   identify gases that comprise the greater percentage of air and explain the difference between Earth’s atmosphere and space b)   describe the importance of atmospheric gases, including ozone and greenhouse gases, to life on Earth

poster depicting the key features of a chosen insect, identifying adaptations

What do ants look like? Size: 1 mm - 50 mm in length. Body: Elongate and constricted at 'waist'. Abdomen swollen, sometimes greatly. One or two knobs at waist. These knobs sometimes are reduced or flattened. Appears hard. Antennae: Thread-like and distinctly elbowed. Segment closest to body much longer (at least five times as long) than any of the remaining segments. Eyes: Range from large and well separated to small. Nocturnal or litter dwelling species may have reduced eyes or no eyes at all. Mouthparts: For chewing or munching. Held in front at rest. Wings Two pairs if present. Only reproductives have wings, which are sometimes lost after mating and before constructing the founder nest. Both pairs membranous, clear and with few veins and cells. At rest wings are held flat to the body and almost entirely overlapping. Limbs: Six slender legs. Abdomen tip: Cerci (tails) absent but some have a prominent stinger.

http://www.australianmuseum.net.au/image/Ant

Key Science Content from syllabus

food chains

4.10     ecosystems b)   describe, using examples of food chains and food webs from Australian ecosystems, how producers, consumers and decomposers are related

food webs

4.10     ecosystems b)   describe, using examples of food chains and food webs from Australian ecosystems, how producers, consumers and decomposers are related

producers

consumers

decomposers

ecosystems

4.10     ecosystems c)  describe the roles of photosynthesis and respiration in ecosystems

photosynthesis

respiration

effects, bushfires, drought, flood

habitat, biotic, abiotic

adaptations

4.10     ecosystems a)   describe some adaptations of living things to factors in their environment

factors causing adaptations, stay alive, surviving in environment, finding food, protect from prey, reproduce, sexual/asexual, newborn survival

atmosphere

4.9.4    the atmosphere a)   identify gases that comprise the greater percentage of air and explain the difference between Earth’s atmosphere and space b)   describe the importance of atmospheric gases, including ozone and greenhouse gases, to life on Earth   Greenhouse effect Investigation http://www.riskassess.com.au/risk_assessment/187453 Background Research (teacher directed): 1. Watch the following Brainpop Video, the login and password are nbcs, nbcs: http://www.brainpop.com/science/earthsystem/earthsatmosphere/ 2. Which gases make up the atmosphere? 3. What is the difference between the atmosphere and space? 4. For each of the following gases identify their importance to life on earth: a. Oxygen (include respiration) b. Nitrogen c. Carbon dioxide (include photosynthesis) d. Methane e. Ozone Equipment for each group 1. Thermometer 2. Temperature probe 3. Cardboard (for box construction) X2 4. Sticky tape 5. Scissors 6. Light source – microscope lamp 7. Stopwatch 8. Coloured cellophane 9. Clear cellophane 10. Paper 11. Aluminum foil 12. Ruler 13. Glad wrap 14. Graph paper Part A Standard method 1. Construct a box without a lid using the template supplied 2. Place the box 20cm distance from a light source 3. Insert a thermometer or temperature probe through the hole, so that it is sitting in the middle of the space in the box 4. Measure the change in temperature when the light is turned on, once a minute for 10 minutes. 5. Repeat the experiment, but cover the open lid with clear cellophone. For the experiment above: Write an aim Write a hypothesis Write a risk assessment Draw an appropriate diagram of your setup List all variables. Distinguish between controlled and uncontrolled variables. Identify the dependent variable Identify the independent variable 9. Identify the “control” 10. Graph your results 11. Analyse your graph for the usefulness of the data. a. Should the readings be more or less frequent? b. Should the readings be taken over a longer/shorter time period? c. Does the information on your graph support your hypothesis? 12. Save this file for your study records. Part B Use the method above as a starting point to investigate a different independent variable: 1. List all the things that could be investigated to see their effect on temperature in a box! 2. Choose one of the things from your list to investigate, using the materials available. 3. Answer all the questions below on your method: Write an aim Write a hypothesis Write a risk assessment Draw an appropriate diagram of your setup Identify the dependent variable Identify the independent variable g. Identify the “control” 4. Write a draft method for your investigation, incorporating any improvement on the standard method. 5. Carry out your investigation 6. Graph your results 7. Write a conclusion that analyses your hypothesis. 8. Identify any changes or improvements you made to your method. 9. Submit this Part B document Cut along the unbroken lines, fold along the dashed lines, and stickytape together.

identify gases

difference between atmosphere and space

importance to life of:, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, ozone

inquiry ideas

what bugs are out there in the bush?

who eats who in the Terrey Hills bush?

what is an ecosystem?

what would happen to the Terrey Hills bush if a flood/bushfire/drought occurred?

if an bug was 100 times bigger could it survive?

what adaptations can i identify in a organism?

Case study of National Park (Smith Creek) Is it the best land use?

Ants: what do thwy tell us about the environment?

why should i care about the environment?

Logistics for learning

summary: the entire unit is based around the collection of insect information from the local bush, the generation of a database of informaiton and the research that supports that.

insect collection

real?, bug killing?, bug storage

digital?

plant collection

data collection on insect

dimensions, height, length, of individual components, weight

Photograph + drawing/diagram

insect identification

how will students record their data?

what will students submit?

food chain examples for their collected bug and plant

database entry for their insect, photo, name, dimensions, data for food chain and food web generation, food, prey, habitat

blog post or audio or photo esay on why should i care about the environment?

food web - poster, diorama,

resources

Streamwatch water bug kit - http://www.streamwatch.org.au/cms/resources/manual_pdfs/BugGuide.pdf

Field guide to Victorian fauna http://itunes.apple.com/au/app/field-guide-to-victorian-fauna/id423945031?mt=8

http://museumvictoria.com.au/bioinformatics/

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Bugwise

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Uploads/Documents/9382/The%20Invertebrate%20Collection%20Manual.pdf

Lessons

Lesson 1: go bush collect photo's and specimens

Lesson 2: review collection allocate individual organisms

to students  - on eplant and one bug each

lesson 3: research on individual organisms to complete database

lesson 4: back to the bush for more research, observation of habitat

lesson 5: update moodle database, prepare food chain examples for organisms, role of photosynthesis and respiration

lesson 6: use database to prepare food web, identify adaptations on organisms

Lesson 7: What are the effects of bushfire, drought and flood on an ecosystem

Lesson 8: Continue food web presentation. Consider effect of bushfire, drought and flood on your food web.

Lesson 9: Work on presentation: why should i care about the environment?

Lesson 10: spare lesson to finalise work for submission

Lesson Resources

Lesson 1: field data collection tool

Spend time within the ecosystem recording observations of the abiotic and biotic factors that influence the ecosystem. Observe any evidence of human impact on the ecosystem. A map of the study area.

lesson 2: database activity in moodle

Lesson 3: access to identification resources

lesson 4: field data collection tool

lesson 5: what is a food chain? Include a template for food chains?

lesson 6: what is a food web? What are adaptations? include template for food webs?

Lesson 7: scaffold for effects on ecosystems

Lesson 8: continues from lesson 6 and 7

Lesson 9: needs stimulus and scaffold

Key Skills from Syllabus

4.13 clarifies the purpose of an investigation and, with guidance, produces a plan to investigate a problem 4.14 follows a sequence of instructions to undertake a first-hand investigation 4.15 uses given criteria to gather first-hand data 4.16 accesses information from identified secondary sources 4.17 evaluates the relevance of data and information 4.18 with guidance, presents information to an audience to achieve a particular purpose 4.19 draws conclusions based on information available

data collection

first hand, observation, Measurement

secondhand

data analysis

Reporting of findings

inquiry driven lessons?

lesson 1: What bugs are out there?

lesson 2: what bugs did i bring back?

lesson 3: how can i organize all this information?

lesson4: what more can i learn?

Lesson 5: where does the energy from the sun go?

lesson 6: how do these bugs and plants interact? how can i show all these interactions?

lesson 7: are floods, droughts and bushfires all bad for the ecosystem?

lesson 8: how do i make my food web really communicate scientific information?

Lesson 9: why should i care about the environment?

Open Ended Investigation on Greenhouse effect

Greenhouse effect Investigation http://www.riskassess.com.au/risk_assessment/187453 Background Research (teacher directed): 1. Watch the following Brainpop Video, the login and password are nbcs, nbcs: http://www.brainpop.com/science/earthsystem/earthsatmosphere/ 2. Which gases make up the atmosphere? 3. What is the difference between the atmosphere and space? 4. For each of the following gases identify their importance to life on earth: a. Oxygen (include respiration) b. Nitrogen c. Carbon dioxide (include photosynthesis) d. Methane e. Ozone Equipment for each group 1. Thermometer 2. Temperature probe 3. Cardboard (for box construction) X2 4. Sticky tape 5. Scissors 6. Light source – microscope lamp 7. Stopwatch 8. Coloured cellophane 9. Clear cellophane 10. Paper 11. Aluminum foil 12. Ruler 13. Glad wrap 14. Graph paper Part A Standard method 1. Construct a box without a lid using the template supplied 2. Place the box 20cm distance from a light source 3. Insert a thermometer or temperature probe through the hole, so that it is sitting in the middle of the space in the box 4. Measure the change in temperature when the light is turned on, once a minute for 10 minutes. 5. Repeat the experiment, but cover the open lid with clear cellophone. For the experiment above: Write an aim Write a hypothesis Write a risk assessment Draw an appropriate diagram of your setup List all variables. Distinguish between controlled and uncontrolled variables. Identify the dependent variable Identify the independent variable 9. Identify the “control” 10. Graph your results 11. Analyse your graph for the usefulness of the data. a. Should the readings be more or less frequent? b. Should the readings be taken over a longer/shorter time period? c. Does the information on your graph support your hypothesis? 12. Save this file for your study records. Part B Use the method above as a starting point to investigate a different independent variable: 1. List all the things that could be investigated to see their effect on temperature in a box! 2. Choose one of the things from your list to investigate, using the materials available. 3. Answer all the questions below on your method: Write an aim Write a hypothesis Write a risk assessment Draw an appropriate diagram of your setup Identify the dependent variable Identify the independent variable g. Identify the “control” 4. Write a draft method for your investigation, incorporating any improvement on the standard method. 5. Carry out your investigation 6. Graph your results 7. Write a conclusion that analyses your hypothesis. 8. Identify any changes or improvements you made to your method. 9. Submit this Part B document Cut along the unbroken lines, fold along the dashed lines, and stickytape together.