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Volunteers with mental health needs by Mind Map: Volunteers with
mental health needs
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Volunteers with mental health needs

Contribution - high interest stakeholders

High influence

Sponsors, Limited involvement of volunteers with mental health needs outside of mental health organisations (See link: page 3), Ensure buy-in from the top down (See link: page 4), Opportunities for service-user involvement - people with first-hand experience of the health and social care system (See link), Setting up special agencies to place people with mental health needs in volunteering roles (See link: page 5), Review the organisation's strategic approach for involving volunteers (see link for purchasing guide), Checklist of questions to consider if the organisation is ready for engaging supported volunteers (See link: page 16)

Blockers, Implications on welfare benefits (See link), View that service-users should not be volunteers within the same organisation (See link: page 4), Also, see link, Locate evidence and benchmark practices where service-users can also be volunteers (See link: page 3), How to draw a clear distinction between service user involvement and volunteering (see response to original post on link), Organisational concerns regarding their 'duty of care' (See link)

Low influence

Beneficiaries, Develop a reciprocal relationship between the volunteer and the organisation they are part of (See link: page 4), Supporting volunteers with mental health needs is beneficial to those providing the support (See link: page 3), Sense of achievement of staff group (See link), Develop peer support schemes (See link : page 2)

Victims, Volunteers experience of discrimination due to mental health problems (See link: page 3), (Also, see link), Regular meetings with knowledgeable supervisors; mentoring a buddy schemes (See link: page 2), Other people's lack of awareness and negative attitudes of mental health issues (see link: page 2), Develop a mental health policy for engaging with volunteers with mental health needs (See link: page 5 and guide: pages 7-9), It is difficult to talk about mental health issues with the staff (See link: page 3), Identify a named member of staff with specialist knowledge of mental health issues (See link), Develop a sense of team (See link: page 3), For example, involve volunteers in peer to peer support, buddying and group supervision sessions (See link), Volunteers with mental health needs working together (See link: 'myth 6')

Contribution - low interest stakeholders

High Influence

Positive influencers, Volunteering for people with mental health problems tends to be within the health and social care sector (See link: page 1), Mental illness affects 25% of the population, providing the opportunity to profile volunteering in a wide range of contexts (See link), Limited evidence of impact of volunteering for people with mental health problems in terms of social inclusion and reducing discrimination (See link: page 6), Measuring the contribution of volunteers with mental health problems (See link: page 6), Profile successes, which in turn can create new opportunities (See link: page 3), Volunteering reduces depression, which is relevant to GPs and the DH/DWP (See link: page 9), Work with funders to establish measures that show the real achievements of volunteers with mental health needs. Also, gather stories of their achievements (See link: page 5 & 18), Work in partnership with community bridge builders and supported volunteering practitioners (See link), (Also, see link: page 26), (Also, see link: page 2), To engage with BAME communities (NB 44% of mental health service users involved in capital Volunteering were from a BAME background (See link: page 13), Mental health issues becoming more common and the costs of associated high sickness absence concerns the DH, the DWP and a number of other stakeholders [both employers and unions] (See link), Volunteering reduces the costs of supporting service-users (See link: page 23), Promote the beneficial therapeutic effects of volunteering to clinicians/support workers etc. (See link: page 4), Engaging volunteers with mental health needs can develop an employer's credibility as an inclusive employer (See link), Few people with mental health problems are encouraged to volunteer by their Job Centre (See link: page 1), Key-workers & support staff to liaise with volunteer-involving organisations (See link: page 3), Also, volunteer-involving organisations to include the volunteer's support staff (See link), People with mental health needs have capacity for empathy, which suits certain volunteering roles (See link), Limited evidence available on barriers to volunteering, the role of Volunteer Centres and the provision of information on volunteering (See link: page 4), Key-workers & support staff to liaise with volunteer-involving organisations (See link: page 3), For national organisations, share successes and lessons learnt (See link: page 26)

Negative influencers, Increased support required by the organisation, which may not be readily available (See link), Take steps to develop staff skills and confidence to work effectively with volunteers (See link: page 2), Explore with prospective volunteers to establish what support is needed (See link), Ensure learning mechanisms are built in where innovation and risk is encouraged (See link: page 11), Referrals being made too early (See link), Develop a positive relationship with agencies referring volunteers to you (See link: page 8), Checklist of questions that form the basis of a discussion with a potential volunteer with additional support needs (See link: page 10)

Low influence

Bystanders, Promote the range of benefits of volunteering to prospective volunteers (See link 2: page 4), benefits can include a positive family life (See link: pages 5 and 8), Insufficient choice of volunteering opportunities (See link: page 2), Work in partnership with 'bridge-building' organisations, to develop new and innovative volunteering opportunities (See link: page 2), Research local needs before seeking to engage volunteers (See link: page 4)

Commitment

Achievement

Develop activities that increase with responsibilities over time (See link)

Develop rewarding volunteering opportunities (See link: page 2)

Provide volunteers with the chance to try something new (See link: page 4)

The desire to use volunteering as a stepping-stone to employment is undermined if paid employments has contributed to mental health difficulties in the past (See link: page 3), Identify success stories where volunteering has been a stepping stone to rewarding employment (See link: page 3), Build links with employment and training providers (See link)

Status/Influence

The organisation did not really need them (See link: page 3)

A long wait (e.g. CRB checks etc.) can make people feel unwanted and rejected (See link), Keep in touch with people waiting to start volunteering (See link)

Social/affiliation

Volunteering can reduce a sense of isolation (See link), (Also, see link: page 1)

Safety

Afraid of starting something new (See link: page 2), Consult current volunteers about any changes that may affect them (See link: page 3), Break down volunteer assignments into smallest task 'pieces' (See Link), Run pre-volunteering training courses (See link)

Dilemma of whether to disclose mental health diagnosis/problems for fear of being discriminated against (See link: page 5), Discuss and agree the extent of disclosure with prospective volunteers (See link), A list of reasons for and against disclosure (See link pages 5-6), Reasons for: Can better tailor a volunteering role. An opportunity to describe a need in a positive way. Volunteers will be more trusted. Reduces stress for volunteers. Raises potential health and safety issues. Can change an organisation's perspective., Reasons against: Managers may have preconceived ideas. Volunteers 'having a bad day', can be mistakenly attributed to their support needs. Others may treat the person differently inappropriately. Volunteers overlooked for responsible roles. Uncomfortable to a volunteer to discuss with a stranger. Volunteer may feel labelled., Ensure volunteers understand why you want the information (See link: page 7), Clarify consent and 'need to know' access on application forms and interviews (See link: page 7, Explain a commitment to equal opportunities on volunteer adverts (See link: page 7)

The side effects of medication (See link: page 2)

Previous 'bad experiences' - stigma around mental health (See link), Prospective volunteers to speak to other volunteers (See link: page 3), Organise tasters to volunteering opportunities (See link: page 4)

Concerns around being able to maintain regular attendance (See link: page 25), Encourage trial volunteering periods (See link)

Practicality

Unsure how their benefits might be affected (See link: page 2), Provide access to information around benefits (See link)

Expenses not provided (See link: page 5), Arrange for payment of expenses and make it uncomplicated to claim these (See link: page 2)

Could not afford to volunteer (See link: page 2)

Lack of time to volunteer (See link: page 2)

The need to provide references and work history on application forms (See link: page 2)

Competence

Skills

Organisational, The need to provide references and work history on application forms (See link: page 2), Guidance for discussing mental health in interviewing and recruitment (See link: pdf pages 5-7), Recruitment methods (restricted to posters etc.) are insufficient (See link: page 5), Development of tailored recruitment strategy that includes several recruitment methods (See link: pages 2 & 6), Involve volunteers in the creation of volunteer adverts (See link), A mismatch between volunteering opportunities offered and the volunteers skills and interests (see link: page 2), Establish abilities, goals and work-styles of each volunteer and match with assignments (See link), Develop activities that increase with responsibilities over time (See link), Develop volunteering opportunities around the individual's needs and interests (See link: page 4), Checklist of things to consider to when seeking to match a volunteer with a role (See link: pages 19-20), Volunteers experience of discrimination due to mental health problems (See link: page 3), Ensure support is consistently available and provided flexibly (See link: page 4), Summary guidance for monitoring volunteers with mental health needs (See link: pdf pages 8-9), Ensure current staff and volunteers have an awareness of mental health (See link), Insufficient information provided about volunteering opportunities (See link: page 2), (Also see link: page 59), Run pre-volunteering training courses (See link), Voluntary work not very well organised (See link: page 3), Adopt good practices for involving volunteers with mental health needs. (For checklist see link), (Also, see link), Ensure the volunteering experience is evaluated and a complaints procedure is in place (See link: page 22), Limited skills & resources to access and place volunteers (See link), Summary guidance for placing volunteers with mental health needs (See link: pdf page 7), Checklist for recruiting and placing volunteers with additional support needs (See link: pages 13-15)

Individual

Knowledge

Organisational, Other people's lack of awareness of mental health issues. NB the majority of volunteers are supervised by line managers, rather than a volunteer manager (see link: page 2), Volunteer managers developing their awareness about mental health issues in general. NB Volunteer managers do not have to become an expert in mental health issues (See link), Summary explanations of common forms of mental illness (See link: pdf pages 4-5), Organisational concerns regarding their 'duty of care' (See link), Guidance for discussing mental health in interviewing and recruitment (See link: pdf pages 5-7), Preconceptions around the levels of duties that can be undertaken by volunteers with mental health needs (See link), Volunteer-involving organisations to liaise with support staff (See link)

Individual, Insufficient information about volunteering opportunities (See link: page 2), Provide more information about the volunteering opportunities available (See link: page 2), Run open 'taster' sessions prior to volunteering (See link)