Instructional Design

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Instructional Design by Mind Map: Instructional Design

1. focuses on the learner

2. INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES (Ch 5)

2.1. Cognitive Domain

2.1.1. Cognitive Domain Resource (Week 6)

2.1.1.1. Creating

2.1.1.1.1. #1 at top of Bloom's Taxonomy Pyramid

2.1.1.2. Evaluating

2.1.1.2.1. #2 from top of Bloom's Taxonomy Pyramid

2.1.1.3. Analyzing

2.1.1.3.1. #3 from top of Bloom's Taxonomy Pyramid

2.1.1.4. Applying

2.1.1.4.1. #4 from top of Bloom's Taxonomy Pyramid

2.1.1.5. Understanding

2.1.1.5.1. #5 from top of Bloom's Taxonomy Pyramid

2.1.1.6. Remembering

2.1.1.6.1. # 6 from top; lowest level of Bloom's Taxonomy Pyramid

2.1.2. Bloom's Taxonomy

2.1.2.1. 6 levels in the cognitive domain from lowest to highest=Knowledge,Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

2.1.2.1.1. Knowledge

2.1.2.1.2. Comprehension

2.1.2.1.3. Application

2.1.2.1.4. Analysis

2.1.2.1.5. Synthesis

2.1.2.1.6. Evaluation

2.2. Psychomotor Domain

2.2.1. Psychomotor Domain Resource (Week 6)

2.2.1.1. Dave's model

2.2.1.1.1. Imitate, Manipulate, Precision, Articulation, Naturalization

2.2.1.2. Simpson's model

2.2.1.2.1. Perception, Set, Guided response, Mechanism, Complex overt response, Adaptation, Origination

2.2.1.3. Harrow's model

2.2.1.3.1. Reflex movement, Basic-fundamental movements, Perceptual abilities, Physical abilities, Skilled movements, Nondiscursive communication

2.2.2. physical activities, levels of objectives=Imitation, Manipulation, Precision, Articulation

2.2.2.1. Imitation

2.2.2.2. Manipulation

2.2.2.3. Precision

2.2.2.4. Articulation

2.2.2.5. Naturalization

2.3. Affective Domain

2.3.1. Affective Domain Resource (Week 6)

2.3.1.1. Theories of Attitude Formation and Change

2.3.1.1.1. Behavioral Learning Theory

2.3.1.1.2. Cognitive Dissonance Theory

2.3.1.1.3. Affective-Cognitive Consistency

2.3.1.1.4. Social Judgment Theories

2.3.1.1.5. Social Learning Theory

2.3.1.1.6. Functional Theories

2.3.1.1.7. Krathwohl's Taxonomy

2.3.2. 5 levels=Receiving, Responding, Valuing, Organizing, Characterizing

2.3.2.1. Receiving

2.3.2.2. Responding

2.3.2.3. Valuing

2.3.2.4. Organizing

2.3.2.5. Characterizing by a value complex

3. INTRO TO THE PROCESS (Ch 1)

3.1. Roles

3.1.1. Instructional Designer

3.1.1.1. planner, coordinator, and manager with primary responsibility for designing the intruction

3.1.2. SME

3.1.2.1. Subject-Matter Expert is the content and resource expert

3.1.3. Evaluator

3.1.3.1. instruments for pre and post testing, gathering and interpreting data, and determining the effectiveness and efficiency of the program

3.2. Design Model

3.2.1. Instructional Problem

3.2.1.1. need for instruction

3.2.2. Learners

3.2.2.1. target audience

3.2.3. ADDIE

3.2.3.1. Analysis Design Development Implementation and Evaluation

3.2.4. Methods

3.2.4.1. process

3.2.5. Objectives

3.2.5.1. focal point

3.2.6. Evaluation

3.2.6.1. assessment

4. IDENTIFYING THE NEED (Ch 2)

4.1. Needs Assessment

4.1.1. 1. Normative Needs

4.1.1.1. compares target to norm or standard

4.1.2. 2. Comparative Needs

4.1.2.1. compares target to a peer group

4.1.3. 3. Felt Needs

4.1.3.1. desire to improve

4.1.4. 4. Expressed Needs

4.1.4.1. felt need turned into action

4.1.5. 5. Anticipated Needs

4.1.5.1. identifying future changes

4.1.6. 6. Critical Incident Needs

4.1.6.1. analyzing potential problems

4.2. Goal Analysis

4.2.1. "defining the undefinable", set priorities

4.3. Performance Assessment

4.3.1. Identify the performance problem

5. TASK ANALYSIS (Ch 4)

5.1. Task Analysis

5.1.1. determination of needs and goals

5.2. Topic Analysis

5.2.1. identifies the content and the structure

5.2.2. Content Structures

5.2.2.1. Facts, Concepts, Principles and Rules, Procedures, Interpersonal Skills, and Attitudes

5.3. Procedural Analysis

5.3.1. Identify the steps to complete the learning task

6. SEQUENCING (Ch 6)

6.1. Elaboration Theory Sequencing

6.1.1. Content Expertise Sequencing

6.1.1.1. conceptual or theoretical

6.1.2. Task Experience Sequencing

6.1.2.1. simplifying conditions method

6.1.3. distiguishes between the types of expertise to be developed

6.2. (POSNER AND STRIKE SEQUENCING SCHEMES)

6.2.1. Concept-Related Sequencing

6.2.1.1. Class relations, Propositional releations, Sophistication, Logical prerequisite

6.2.2. World-Related Sequencing

6.2.2.1. Spatial Relations

6.2.2.1.1. physical layout

6.2.2.2. Temporal Relations

6.2.2.2.1. timeline

6.2.2.3. Physical Attributes

6.2.2.3.1. (appearance, characteristics)

6.2.3. Learning-Related Sequencing

6.2.3.1. 5 Student Learning Concepts

6.2.3.1.1. Identifiable prerequisite, Familiarity, Difficulty, Interest, Development

7. Learner Characteristics

7.1. Tessmer & Richey Article (Week 4)

7.1.1. Contextual Levels (3)

7.1.1.1. Orienting Context

7.1.1.2. Instructional Context

7.1.1.3. Transfer Context

7.1.2. Contextual Factors

7.1.2.1. Learner Factors

7.1.2.2. Immediate Environment Factors

7.1.2.3. Organizational Factors

7.2. LEARNER AND CONTEXTUAL ANALYSIS (Ch 3)

7.2.1. Learner Analysis

7.2.1.1. Characteristics, different traits

7.2.2. Contextual Analysis

7.2.2.1. Orienting Context

7.2.2.2. Instructional Context

7.2.2.2.1. environmental consideration

7.2.2.3. Transfer Context

7.2.2.3.1. continuing to apply knowledge and skills learned

8. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (Ch 7)

8.1. Generative Strategies

8.1.1. Recall

8.1.2. Integration

8.1.3. Organizational

8.1.4. Elaboration

9. Gagne Resources (Week 8)

9.1. Conditions of Learning

9.1.1. Nine Events of Instruction

9.1.1.1. 1. Gaining attention

9.1.1.2. 2. Informing Learners of the Objective

9.1.1.3. 3. Stimulating Recall of Prior Learning

9.1.1.4. 4. Presenting the Stimulus

9.1.1.5. 5. Providing Learning Guidance

9.1.1.6. 6. Eliciting Performance

9.1.1.7. 7. Providing Feedback

9.1.1.8. 8. Assessing Performance

9.1.1.9. 9. Enhancing Retention and Transfer

9.1.2. 5 Categories of Learning Outcomes

10. DESIGNING THE INSTRUCTIONAL MESSAGE (Ch 8)

10.1. Preinstructional Strategies

10.1.1. Pretest

10.1.2. Behavioral objectives

10.1.3. Overview

10.1.4. Advance organizer

11. LEARNING THEORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL THEORY (Ch 14)

11.1. Learning Theory

11.1.1. Instructional Theory

11.1.2. Instructional Design Model

11.1.3. Types of Learning Theory

11.1.3.1. Behavioral Learning Theory

11.1.3.1.1. Social Leaning Theory

11.1.3.2. Cognitive Theory

12. Developing Instructional Materials (Ch 9)

12.1. Cognitive Load

12.1.1. Intrinsic Load

12.1.2. Extrinsic Load

12.1.2.1. Goal-Free Effect

12.1.2.2. Worked-Example Effect

12.1.2.3. Split-Attention Effect

12.1.2.4. Redundancy

13. Mayer's Principles (Ch 10)

13.1. 1. Coherence Principle

13.2. 2. Signaling Principle

13.3. 3. Redundancy Principle

13.4. 4. Spatial Contiguity Principle

13.5. 5. Temporal Contiguity Principle

13.6. 6. Segmenting Principle

13.7. 7. Pre-Training Principle

13.8. 8. Modality Principle

13.9. 9. Personalization Principle

13.10. 10. Voice Principle

14. EVALUATION (Ch 11)

14.1. Three types of evaluation

14.1.1. Formative Evaluation

14.1.2. Summative Evaluation

14.1.3. Confirmative Evaluation

14.2. Standards of Achievement

14.2.1. Relative

14.2.2. Absolute

14.3. necessary qualities

14.3.1. Validity

14.3.2. Reliability

15. IMPLEMENTATION (Ch 15)

15.1. Planned Change

15.1.1. Innovation

15.1.1.1. CLER Model

15.1.1.1.1. Adoption

15.1.1.1.2. Diffusion

15.1.1.2. CBAM

16. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN(Ch 16)

16.1. Project Management

16.1.1. Scope

16.1.1.1. Project Agreement

16.1.1.2. Legal Considerations