APHASIA

Types of aphasia and how they effect your ability to communicate.

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APHASIA by Mind Map: APHASIA

1. BROCA'S APHASIA

1.1. Frontal lobe damage

1.2. Non-fluent, expressive, motor aphasia

1.3. Slowed, halting, speech; typically only 4 or 5 words in an utterance

1.4. Repetition is mildly to severely impaired

1.5. Macrographia (oversized writing) and misspellings are common

1.6. Has trouble with expression

2. TRANSCORTICAL MOTOR APHASIA

2.1. Very similar to symptoms of broca's aphasia

2.2. Strong repetition and strong oral reading

3. STROKE(CVA)

3.1. Most common cause of Aphasia

3.1.1. Can also cause RHD and Dementia

3.2. 4 Million people in U.S are stroke survivors

3.3. Ischemic Stroke: blockage of blood supply to brain

3.4. Hemorrhagic Stroke: excessive blood ruptures into brain

4. GLOBAL APHASIA

4.1. Large, or multiple areas of brain are injured

4.2. Effects different or many sensory modalities

4.3. Likely to be non-fluent with poor language comprehension

4.4. Often nonverbal with very few gestures

5. ASSESSMENT OF APHASIA

5.1. Professionals use the holistic approach (viewing everything as a whole)

5.1.1. Normally different professionals word together in the treatment setting

5.2. ALPS: relatively brief aphasia battery that is often appropriate for clients at this stage

5.2.1. Examination is immediately done after neurological injury

5.3. BEST: Bedside evaluation screening test

5.4. Prognostic Indicators: variables that assist in predicting recovery

5.4.1. Functional Outcomes: Improvement in communication is essential in the Speech pathologists practice

6. WERNICKE'S APHASIA

6.1. Temporal,sometimes parietal lobe damage

6.2. Fluent, receptive, and sensory aphasia

6.3. Spontaneous speech and utterences

6.4. Logorrhea (excessive talking)

6.4.1. Neologisms (no words)

6.4.2. Jargon (nonsensical sentences)

6.4.3. Circumlocation

6.5. Difficulty with interpreting written and verbal messages, and repetition

6.6. Has trouble with comprehension

7. TRANSCORTICAL SENSORY APHASIA

7.1. Damage at border of temporal lobe and occipital lobe

7.2. Similar to Wernicke's aphasia

7.3. Have good repetition skills

7.3.1. Echolalia: repeat auditory stimuli

8. CONDUCTION APHASIA

8.1. Temporal-parietal damage at the arcuate fasciculus (pathway connecting communication with speech production and reception)

8.2. Fluent with conduction, mild to moderate expressive deficits

8.3. Unable to use repetition but understands

9. ANOMIC APHASIA

9.1. Most common aphasia

9.2. Severe naming and writing deficits

10. RHD ANOTHER DISORDER OF LANGUAGE AND COGNITION

10.1. Right-hemisphere dysfunction(RHD)

10.2. Loss of nutrients and oxygen to the brain causes damage to brain tissue

10.2.1. Caused by stroke, illness, or disease

10.3. Lack of attention to left side of body

10.4. Difficulty recognizing faces

10.5. Wordy expression, including tangents

10.6. Problems with higher-level abstract thinking and language use

10.7. Lack of awareness of communicative and cognitive impairments

11. TBI ANOTHER DISORDER OF LANGUAGE AND COGNITION

11.1. Traumatic brain injury (TBI)

11.2. Neurological damage to brain tissue due to closed- or open-head injury

11.2.1. Caused by motor vehicle accident, fall, recreational sports accident, act of violence

11.3. Possible significan personality changes

11.4. Widespread language expression and comprehension problems

12. DEMENTIA ANOTHER DISORDER OF LANGUAGE AND COGNITION

12.1. Gradual onset of declines in cognitive, language, and daily living functions due to progressive central nervous system dysfunction

12.2. Cause is Neurological disease and multiple strokes

12.2.1. Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, Pick's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

12.3. Short and long-term memory impairment

12.4. Impairment in cognitive skills

12.5. Presence of aphasia, apraxia, or agnosia