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Portable Devices:Their processors and operating systems 2010-Q1 by Mind Map: Portable Devices:Their processors
and operating systems 2010-Q1
0.0 stars - 0 reviews range from 0 to 5

Portable Devices:Their processors and operating systems 2010-Q1

Saphaire NievesNetbook VS iPad


Pros, Travel sized. Full support of Flash/Silverlight. has keyboard. Word, excel, etc run full. Local storage for all documents. A mini PC. Low cost. long battery life.

Cons, Screen is very small. Wording is hard to read. No Optical Drive (CD-ROM drive). Smaller Keyboard.

Browser, Any browser you prefer.


Pros, the browsing experience on an iPad is pretty great. No tabs in the browser. Good to play games with. Open several pages at once/easy to flip through pages. Light for traveling. Has Wi-Fi

Cons, Not able to fit in pocket. Apps on the iPad are not free. No local storage. Word and Excel features do not work properly. Bad for writing papers/taking notes. Mac/PC special requirements for usage. 3G data plans through AT&T(monthly charge).

Browser, Apple safari only.


CES 2010 Best Notebook: IdeaPad U1 Hybrid we went at this year’s CES, everyone was talking about the U1 Hybrid, and with good reason. As a notebook, this Windows 7-based system sports a Core 2 Duo ULV processor, a solid state drive, and a striking chassis with a translucent red lid and rubberized deck. But things really get interesting when you detach the 11.6-inch screen, transforming this device into a slick and versatile tablet. In slate mode the U1 has a separate ARM CPU, 3G connectivity, and Lenovo’s new Skylight Linux-based OS. If you're surfing the Web and then dock the U1, you can pick up right where you left off in Windows mode. At $999, this innovation doesn't come cheap, but Lenovo's ambitious hybrid is an exciting example of where mobile computing is heading. Tim Eason


Pros, Iashah Niazi: iPad will be able to run third-party apps without modifications. Kind of like the iPhone! Yes, Apple will profit off of an even more hyped-up app store, but users will benefit from the flexibility and creativity brought in by (mostly profit-seeking) developers. Also key: the iBooks e-reader app. It may not instantly rescue all of journalism, but it’s a start, and this may make the iPad an attractive choice for consumers who don’t want to buy black-and-white, restricted Internet e-readers. More broadly, in the words of David Carr, “the iPad is creating and killing categories at the same time;” the free market says that third-party devs will best be able to figure out what to do with all of that potential., Iashah Niazi Apple's iPad has many excellent features. It is small and portable and it has 3G capability, allowing it to connect to the Internet in more places than Wi-Fi hot-spots. In addition, the iPad is competitively priced with other netbook competitors. Apple's iWork is available for the iPad at a negligible cost. The iPad's battery life is 10 hours, and the entire machine is made of environmentally friendly and recycled products.

Cons, Iashah Niazi:It’s running on the iPhone operating system (currently, version 3.2); no OS X. Among other things, this means no multitasking: as in, you can’t run two applications at the same time. Also: no Flash (see below). Engadget: “There’s no multitasking at all. It’s a real disappointment. All this power and very little you can do with it at once. No multitasking means no streaming Pandora when you’re working in Pages., Iashah Niazi The Apple iPad's keypad is on the touch screen and could be difficult for users to navigate. Although select devices has 3G capabilities, this feature has to be turned on with a service agreement with AT&T. Though there is a microphone, the device is missing a camera. Last, the screen is exposed, unlike that of the iPhone and iTouch, and can easily be scratched.