Mark 7:24-37

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Mark 7:24-37 by Mind Map: Mark 7:24-37

1. 24-30 // Gentile Mother

1.1. 24

1.1.1. Tyre

1.1.1.1. upper Galilee

1.1.1.2. Tyre was financially powerful enough to buy grain for itself in crisis situations. But even in “normal” times the farmers in the territory inhabited by Jews would often, and justly, have had the feeling of having to produce for the rich city-dwellers while they themselves lived in want

1.1.1.3. REF: Ready for idol worship - "The voice of a god and not a man" - Acts 12:20

1.1.1.4. Enemy of Jews!

1.1.1.5. Home city of Jezebel

1.1.1.6. Tyre (modern Lebanon), which lay directly west and north of Galilee, was a Gentile region with a long history of antagonism to Israel. The region of Tyre (formerly Phoenicia) had been the home of Jezebel, who in Elijah's day had nearly subverted the Northern Kingdom with her pagan prophets and practices (1 Kgs 16: 31-32). During the Maccabean Revolt in the second century B.C., Tyre, along with Ptolemais and Sidon, fought on the side of the Seleucids against the Jews (1 Macc 5: 15ff.). The prophets decried the wealth and terror of Tyre (Ezek 26: 17; Zech 9: 3). Josephus concluded opprobriously that the inhabitants of Tyre were "notoriously our bitterest enemies" (Ag. Ap. 1.13). Edwards Jr., James R. (2009-10-05). The Gospel according to Mark (Pillar New Testament Commentary) (Kindle Locations 4127-4132). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

1.1.2. could not be hidden

1.1.3. What's happening

1.1.3.1. The first account, of course, tells us about how we should approach Jesus. It’s the story of the Syrophoenician woman. Verse 24 says, “Jesus left that place and went to the vicinity of Tyre. He entered a house and did not want anyone to know it.” What’s going on? This is very significant. We’ll get back to it in just a second. Jesus spent all of his time ministering in Jewish provinces amongst the Israelites in Judea. That ministry was going so incredibly well that it was crushing. The crowds were overwhelming. He was exhausted. Actually we’ve seen a number of times (if you’ve been with us all through this series) Jesus constantly trying to find some peace and quiet, trying to get a respite. What he does here is he does something that’s virtually unique in the book of Mark and anywhere else. Jesus leaves the Jewish provinces, which he never did. He goes into a Gentile territory, to Tyre, in order to get some peace and quiet, but it doesn’t work because a woman hears about it Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.2. Who is this woman?

1.2.1. She is a gentile - generally outside teh commonwealth of Israel

1.2.1.1. Most Jews in the first century (John 18: 28; Acts 10: 28) shared without question the prejudice that Gentiles defiled by touch, just like a person with a flux. They regarded their uncleanness as something innate, not caused by the list of impurities in Leviticus 11– 15.2 Gentiles were impure simply because they were Gentiles. The humble request of this Gentile woman, therefore, creates dramatic tension. Will Jesus be as gracious to this lady from Tyre as he was to the unclean outcasts within Israel? Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 288). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.2.2. She is a woman - generally treated badly and looked down upon by the culture

1.2.3. She is a syrophoenician

1.2.4. She is from Tyre

1.2.4.1. Oppressors

1.2.4.1.1. She hails from a city that the Old Testament deemed to be a wealthy and godless oppressor of Israel (see Isa. 23; Jer. 47: 4; Ezek. 26– 28; Joel 3: 4; Amos 1: 9; Zech. 9: 2). Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 288). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.2.4.2. food takers

1.2.4.2.1. The city of Tyre was well stocked with produce from the hinterland of Galilee (see Acts 12: 20), while those who grew the food frequently went hungry. Economically, Tyre took bread away from Galilee. Galileans perceived Tyre politically as posing a permanent threat with expansionist policies since there were no natural boundaries to mark off the two regions. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 293). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.2.4.3. enemies

1.2.4.3.1. The hostility between Tyrians and Jews is reflected in Josephus’s statement that the people from Tyre are “our bitterest enemies” (Ag. Ap. 1 § 70). Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 293). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.2.4.3.2. *** Fought with greeks against macabeans, which remember, the macabeans is the the fuel for messiah zeal

1.2.4.3.3. *** LIken to Johah going to Nineveh

1.2.5. She is a Canaanite (Matthew)

1.2.6. *** This woman is, therefore, not just a Gentile but a member of a resented class of privileged foes. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 293). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.2.7. She knew, therefore, she had none of the religious, moral, social, cultural credentials necessary to approach a Jewish rabbi. Yet though she was a Phoenician Gentile (not a Jew), though she was a pagan (not a God worshiper), though she was a woman (not a man), though her daughter had literally it says an “unclean spirit …” In other words, though she knew she was in every way unclean and, therefore, disqualified according to the religious and respectability standards of the day, disqualified from approaching a moral, devout person, let alone a rabbi, and even though she knew she was on the wrong side of the tracks of every racial and sexual and moral and cultural and social barriers, she didn’t care. She just goes into the house without an invitation. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.3. 25

1.3.1. fell down

1.3.1.1. she assumes the position of a dog

1.3.1.2. in mark, this is always about submission

1.3.2. begged

1.3.2.1. Progressive - she kept begging

1.3.2.1.1. Matthew 15 - matthew conveys this... clearly...

1.3.2.2. Why is she so bold? I don’t think at least this initial burst of boldness is anything all that surprising, is it? It’s not that inexplicable. Do you know why? You know why. Look. There are cowards. There are heroes. There’s everybody in between. Then there are parents, and they’re not on the spectrum because, you see, if your child is going over a cliff, you do what it takes. It doesn’t matter whether you’re timid or brazen; you don’t even think about it. It’s irrelevant. Your character, your personality is irrelevant. You do what it takes. Therefore, it’s not all that surprising that this desperate mother was this bold and willing to break all the barriers. Her first response to Jesus is not surprising, but her second response is history changing. It had a huge effect even on the Protestant Reformation. Her second response is amazing, because Jesus says to her, as she is down on the floor begging … Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.4. 26

1.4.1. Here id

1.4.1.1. Woman

1.4.1.1.1. Both Jewish and Gentile women not only owned property in antiquity, but they also held positions of political power and social status.

1.4.1.2. Gentile

1.4.1.2.1. General

1.4.1.3. Syrophpoenician

1.4.1.3.1. Specific

1.4.1.4. In Matthew - 15:22

1.4.1.4.1. Called a Canaanite - shows conflict

1.4.1.4.2. Rejects her 3 times - first ignores her and then rejects it 2 times

1.4.1.4.3. Disciples also reject her

1.4.1.4.4. Proclaims - great is your faith!

1.5. 27

1.5.1. Dog

1.5.1.1. Some seem to soften this - little dog, house dog, not scavenger

1.5.1.2. Not in a good way, like we say "hey dawg"

1.5.1.3. But it's not really softened

1.5.1.3.1. Burkill’s now famous statement drives the point home, “To call a woman ‘a little bitch’ is no less abusive than to call her ‘a bitch’ without qualification.”

1.5.1.3.2. Skinner denies that Jesus was being playful, “when he refers to her and her daughter as ‘dogs,’ he does not evoke an endearing image or create a jocular mood; he insults them with a familiar pejorative.”5

1.5.1.3.3. Theissen admits that Jesus could have been speaking of a house dog, but then states, “the association of dogs with Gentiles gives it a negative tone in any case.”

1.5.1.3.4. Some contend that Jesus spoke in a gentle tone of voice. McNeile comments, “But if the words were audible to her, we may be sure that a half-humorous tenderness of manner would deprive them of their sting.” 6 France writes: “Written words cannot convey a twinkle in the eye, and it may be that Jesus was jocularly presenting her with the sort of language she might expect from a Jew in order to see how she would react.” 7 Others argue that the use of the diminutive form of the word “dog” takes the bite out of what he says. These are the pets of children that frisk around the table, not the feral packs that prowl the outskirts of towns (Luke 16: 21). But a dog is a dog, whether it is a pampered household pet or a street cur. Most would not understand the epithet as a term of endearment whether Jesus spoke kindly or not. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 291). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.5.1.4. BUt please note: Jesus does not call her a dog.

1.5.1.4.1. He does not say - you dog!

1.5.1.4.2. The dog id to the woman is implied

1.5.1.4.3. Is it not likely that Jesus used common means to get his idea across, and in doing so, challenging the common notion

1.5.1.4.4. Imagine Jesus eating at a table ... in the house.. and dogs...

1.5.1.4.5. Jesus has already declared all thigns clean

1.5.1.5. dogs are bad

1.5.1.5.1. Dogs were associated with uncleanness because they ate garbage, carrion, and corpses (Exod 22: 31; 1 Kgs 21: 23; 22: 38; 2 Kgs 9: 36). Likewise, the expression was a term of opprobrium for people judged worthless and dispensable (1 Sam 24: 15; 2 Sam 16: 9; Isa 56: 10). In the NT its contemptuous force is scarcely mitigated. Jesus warns against entrusting what is sacred to dogs (Matt 7: 6), he describes human wretchedness in terms of a street mongrel licking the sores of a beggar (Luke 16: 21), and Paul refers to his Edwards Jr., James R. (2009-10-05). The Gospel according to Mark (Pillar New Testament Commentary) (Kindle Locations 4170-4174). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

1.5.1.5.2. opponents as dogs (Phil 3: 2). In the rabbinic tradition "dog" remained a term of reproach, referring to "the most despicable, insolent, and miserable of creatures." 12 It was in this opprobrious sense that "dog" was applied to Gentiles. The metaphor was common and varied in rabbinic speech, a fit description in the minds of Jews for Gentiles who were regarded as ignorant, godless, and pagan idolaters. "The peoples of the world are like dogs," declared the rabbis. 13 Edwards Jr., James R. (2009-10-05). The Gospel according to Mark (Pillar New Testament Commentary) (Kindle Locations 4174-4178). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

1.5.1.5.3. REV - outside are the dogs

1.5.1.6. *** Jesus is not always political, but he is always purposeful

1.5.1.6.1. unlike a polititican i will leave unnamed, Jesus doesn't just say it as it is for ratings sake. He says it for redemption sake

1.5.1.6.2. *** Jesus’ supposed want of chivalry. Jesus is deliberately scandalous— throwing stumbling blocks in people’s way. He affronts the Pharisees by calling them hypocrites to their face and scoffing at their beloved tradition, and he insults this Gentile woman by hinting she is a dog. One should allow the scandal to stand and emphasize that one must overcome the scandal before one can open the door for Jesus to help. We can ask ourselves, What in the story would have offended us, and how would we have responded? Our answers should reveal much about ourselves. We might say, “If that is the way he feels, I will never come to him for help.” No one likes being called hypocrites, an evil generation, brood of vipers, whitewashed tombs, foxes, or dogs. Our pride kicks in and keeps us from ever asking for help again. We will turn to gods of our own making who will not offend us, because we convince ourselves that we are special and truly worthy of God’s grace and help. Only when we are truly desperate are we willing to do anything it takes, including humbling ourselves, to find God’s help. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (pp. 293-294). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.5.1.7. Goliath says when he sees David coming to him, “Am I a dog that you would send me this?” So dog is not good Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.5.2. first

1.5.2.1. Jews first then Gentile

1.5.2.2. Jesus understood the mission clearly and this wman picks up on that - only one to do so - and so He gives her a taste of that

1.5.2.2.1. Mark’s narration, and Jesus’ own words, repeatedly emphasize the disciples and rulers lack of understanding (6:52; 7:18; 8:4,11, 17-21)

1.5.2.3. What’s that? Now Matthew gives us a slightly longer version of this (as he usually does) and explains it. It’s not that hard to see. In fact, in a way, it’s hinted at from verse 24. Jesus Christ never left Israel in his whole life. He did not go to Greece. He did not go to Rome. He did not go all over the world. He did not go to the nations. He concentrated his entire ministry on Israel for all sorts of reasons. He said, “I am coming to Israel. I am showing Israel that I’m the fulfillment of the revelation of the Scripture. I’m the fulfillment of all their promises. I’m the fulfillment of all the prophets, priests, and kings. I’m the fulfillment of the temple.” When he dies and he is resurrected, then he immediately says to his Gentiles, “Now go to all the nations.” Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.5.2.3.1. What he is actually saying is, “Hey, there’s an order here. I’m not here for you. I’m not here for the Gentiles. I’m not here for you. I’m here for a respite. There is an order to things. I’m going to Israel first, Gentiles later.” Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.5.3. bread

1.5.3.1. The woman’s response reveals that she comprehends more about the bread that Jesus offers than even his disciples do. They have witnessed the feeding of the five thousand (6: 31– 44, 52) and will witness the feeding of four thousand (8: 1– 10) but still do not understand the bread that Jesus offers (8: 14– 21). This woman, who did not partake in either feeding, begs to receive only the bread crumbs falling from the diners’ laps. She knows that she cannot insist on God’s mercy and does not take offense when Jesus tells her so. She will gladly accept the rank of household dog if it means getting fed. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 289). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.6. 28

1.6.1. Rhoads, "Narrative-Critical," 359: "The cleverness of her response is that she honored his rejection and still found a place for her request."

1.6.2. her response

1.6.2.1. She accepts it

1.6.2.1.1. First, she responds to the challenge. Do you see what she does? She says, “Okay, I get you. I’m not supposed to be at the table. I am not of the tribe of Israel. I do not have the Bible. I do not worship the God of the Bible. I don’t have the Ten Commandments. Okay, I’m unworthy. I don’t have a place at the table. I accept it.” Isn’t that amazing? “I accept it.” She doesn’t get her back up. She doesn’t get all huffy. She doesn’t stand on her rights. “How dare you call me this!” She says, “Okay, I accept it. I don’t have a place at the table. I don’t deserve it. That’s fine, but there’s more than enough on that table for everyone in the world, and I want mine now.” She is wrestling with him in the most respectful way. She is contending with him. Do you remember Abraham in Genesis 18? To God he says, “Oh, I’m just dust and ashes, but Lord, will you spare the city with 40, 30, 20?” Remember that? Remember Jacob wrestling? Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.6.2.1.2. So many today, they won't accept their sinners. They want God to say how valuable they are, how precious they are, how desparately God needs them for fellowship. That's not the picture painted in scripture

1.7. 29

1.7.1. She gets it

1.7.1.1. This willingness to humble oneself is a key requirement for discipleship and something the disciples of Jesus have difficulty learning (9: 35– 37; 10: 44). They have trouble receiving the kingdom as “little children” (10: 15); she has no qualms about receiving the kingdom as a little dog. Like a dog, she will gobble down whatever is granted. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 290). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.7.1.2. *** The fact is, this woman … this pagan woman … is the first person in the gospel of Mark to hear and understand a parable of Jesus. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.7.1.3. Jonathan Edwards- "“This pagan woman understands Jesus’ mission. Disclosed to her in the parable of the children and their dogs at the table, she fully accepts that Jesus must fulfill God’s revelation to Israel but that the superabundance that fulfillment will produce will spill over and include her and others like her. What an irony this is! Jesus has been seeking desperately to teach his chosen Jewish male disciples, yet they have every time been dull and non-comprehending. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.7.1.4. She is, in fact, a female Jacob who has said, ‘I will not let you go till you bless me.’ ” Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.7.1.5. Martin Luther was really amazed by this story and was very moved by it, because he saw the gospel. He saw, “Here’s a woman who understands the gospel.” Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.7.1.6. *** She may have been a Gentile idolater, but she did not suffer from I-dolatry. She did not come expecting praise for her faith but wanting healing for her sick daughter. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 296). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.7.1.6.1. ***She accepts that she is unacceptable.

1.7.1.7. ILL: Bernard of Clairvaux said: It is only when humility warrants it that great graces can be obtained.… And so when you perceive that you are being humiliated, look on it as the sign of a sure guarantee that grace is on the way. Just as the heart is puffed up with pride before its destruction, so it is humiliated before being honored. 19 He concluded, “It is the possession of a joyful and genuine humility that alone enables us to receive grace.” Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 296). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.7.2. BE BOLD

1.7.2.1. How is it possible for us to be that bold? How is it possible? I think most of us, with our religious background, can understand the unworthiness part, that you’re supposed to say, “Okay, if you say I’m a dog, I’m a dog. All right.” We understand that part, but the other part, the feistiness, the humble contentiousness, the coming after, saying, “I will not let you go till you bless me,” we don’t get that Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.7.2.2. Hebrews says we come boldly

1.7.2.3. This is based on him, not us - the boldness is a refelction on him

1.7.2.4. Faith is this way ...

1.8. 30

1.8.1. she went home

1.8.1.1. Sign of her faith. She left with no more assurance

1.9. Summary

1.9.1. Readers are left asking “how far would I go to acquire Jesus’ saving power.” At the same time, they come to realize that Jesus’ power has no boundaries

1.9.2. *** Her humility

1.9.2.1. The woman’s attitude in the face of refusal is the key to this passage. She comes empty-handed and can make no claim. She has no merit, no priority standing, nothing to commend her. Her manner is the opposite of the snippy “you-owe-me” attitude that prevails among so many today. She does not argue that her case is an exception or lobby The woman’s attitude in the face of refusal is the key to this passage. She comes empty-handed and can make no claim. She has no merit, no priority standing, nothing to commend her. Her manner is the opposite of the snippy “you-owe-me” attitude that prevails among so many today. She does not argue that her case is an exception or lobby Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 294). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.9.3. The idea that Jesus is playing devil's advocate by first presenting the (faulty) position of his adversaries makes sense of Jesus' uncharacteristic change of mind in the story. The woman's response is not so clever or so powerful as to change a deeply-held belief about the trajectory of his mission. On the level of the narrative, it provides the opportunity for Jesus to attack the stance of the religious authorities once more, albeit in a more subtle fashion. Jesus' role as devil's advocate allows the woman to utter the very truth to which he holds, and which is modeled in his own ministry and in the later mission of the church. The effect of Mark's story telling is this: Instead of reflecting Jesus' own views, it highlights the extreme difference between his perspective and that of the religious authorities on this matter. The reader would expect this type of rejection to come from a Pharisee, but not from Jesus, especially as it follows his statements of inclusiveness in Mark 7.1-23! 2 The intent of the narrative is not to portray a Jesus who had wishy-washy views about his mission; one who was once exclusive, but became inclusive by means of a clever retort. Instead, the way that the narrative is told allows Mark to contrast the narrow-minded and exclusive stance of Jesus' enemies with his own broad and inclusive views of the beneficiaries of God's blessings in his kingdom, which is reflected in his healing of her daughter and his continued mission to the Gentiles he encounters (Mark 7.31-8.10).

1.9.4. All of these observations point to one important aspect of the narrative: It is not primarily about the supplicant's gender! The narrative emphasizes the fact that she is a Gentile, not a woman. Jesus' refusal in the Markan narrative is not based on her gender, but on her ethnicity'

1.9.5. As Rhoads recognizes, “This episode is fundamentally about crossing boundaries.” 13 It challenges the reader “not to set limits on the universality of the good news of the kingdom of God.” 14 Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 292). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.9.6. It is reasonable to suspect Peter as the source of this story, whose later experience with Cornelius reinforced the truth of this encounter: "' I now realize how true it is that God does not show favoritism but accepts men from every nation who fear him and do what is right'" (Acts 10: 34-35). Edwards Jr., James R. (2009-10-05). The Gospel according to Mark (Pillar New Testament Commentary) (Kindle Locations 4162-4164). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

1.10. Application

1.10.1. Who do you consider outside the boundary?

1.10.1.1. Woman?

1.10.1.2. Democrats?

1.10.1.3. A muslim?

1.10.2. JESUS’ RESPONSE TO this mother’s appeal assumes the special election of Israel. Israel has a central place in the history of salvation. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 294). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2. 31-37 // Deaf and mute man

2.1. 31

2.1.1. Sidon

2.1.1.1. From the region of Tyre Jesus travels over twenty miles north to Sidon, then southeast across the River Leontes, and from there further south through Caesarea Philippi to the Decapolis on the east side of the Sea of Galilee. The horseshoe-shaped itinerary is not a step shy of 120 miles in length. Edwards Jr., James R. (2009-10-05). The Gospel according to Mark (Pillar New Testament Commentary) (Kindle Locations 4234-4236). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

2.1.2. Decapolis

2.2. 32

2.2.1. mogilalos

2.2.1.1. will receive the joy of God. The regions of Tyre and Sidon are, of course, precisely the Lebanon of Isaiah 35. Jesus' healing of this particular mogilalos in the Decapolis becomes the firstfruit of the fulfillment of Isa 35: 10, that Gentile Lebanon will join "the ransomed of the LORD [and] enter Zion with singing"! Salvation thus comes to the Gentile world in Jesus, who is God's eschatological redeemer from Zion. As we have noted before, the only categories adequate for Mark to describe the person and work of Jesus are ultimately the categories of God. Once again, as in the story of the Syrophoenician woman (7: 24-30), "salvation is from the Jews" (John 4: Edwards Jr., James R. (2009-10-05). The Gospel according to Mark (Pillar New Testament Commentary) (Kindle Locations 4263-4268). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

2.3. 33

2.3.1. taking him aside from the crowd privately

2.3.1.1. Jesus intentionally took the man away from the crowd. One can only guess why he did so— did he need privacy for a particularly difficult miracle?— but the effect is clear. In private, he could concentrate entirely on the sufferer’s needs and desires. The focus was on the man and his needs, not on Jesus. Presumably Jesus did not want the man to become part of some miracle show, and he had no desire to add to his own personal glory or revenue. He wanted to make a sufferer hear and speak. The contrast with modern faith healers who intentionally assemble a crowd to watch them heal others is striking. It leads one to ask whether they want to be in the spotlight at the expense of the individual needs of the sufferer. We should always ask whether we do ministry to win publicity for ourselves or to do good for others. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 303). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.3.2. fingers into his ears ... spitting ... touching tongue

2.3.2.1. Healing in the ancient world, however, was a “hands-on” activity. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 300). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.3.2.1.1. Remember, they asked him to lay hands on him

2.3.2.1.2. People in the ancient world expected a healer to do some purposeful action to bring about restoration. Malina notes that this “same external activity in Western culture is viewed predominantly from a technological perspective.…” We would not be so put off if Jesus had used an otoscope and a tongue depressor, things we are accustomed to seeing doctors use. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 300). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.3.2.2. Dones't have to

2.3.2.2.1. So much miracles already without the show

2.3.2.3. Jesus is doing all this for the man - sign language

2.3.2.3.1. **** Lane suggests that Jesus intended to show the deaf man that he could expect healing. 8 He cannot speak to the man because he cannot hear, so he acts out what he intends to do for him. Perhaps these gestures also indicate the difficulty of the healing. His is a complicated case. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 300). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.3.2.3.2. Here’s what Jesus is saying. “Let’s go over here. Don’t be afraid. I’m going to do something about that. I’m going to do something about that. Now let’s look to God.” He is using sign language. He comes into the man’s cognitive world and uses terms he can understand. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

2.4. 34

2.4.1. Ephphatha

2.4.1.1. Mark gives us Jesus’ healing words, “Ephphatha,” which he translates, “Be opened!” so that the reader will not mistake it for some hocus-pocus incantation. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 299). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.4.2. sighed

2.4.2.1. Because at one point, we’re told he looks to heaven, and he sighs. Oh, more than that, it’s a deep sigh. More than that, it’s actually … A better translation might be he moaned. A moan is an expression of pain. Why would Jesus be in pain? You say, “Well, he has emotionally identified with the man and his alienation and his isolation.” Yeah, yeah, maybe. Yes, I’m sure. I’m certain. You’re right. Of course, you’re right, but he is about to heal him! Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

2.4.2.2. Why?

2.4.2.2.1. You know, wouldn’t you think that instead of sighing, Jesus knows he is about to make the guy the happiest man on the face of the earth, he wouldn’t be … Wouldn’t it take a little emotional resonance to anticipate that? I mean, why isn’t Jesus looking at the man, saying, “Wait till you see what I’m going to do for you”? Why is he sighing? I mean, the guy is going to get better! See, there’s a deeper identification going on. There is a cost for Jesus healing this man. What is it? Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

2.4.2.2.2. Mark deliberately tells us by using a word for deaf-mute. It’s the word in the place where it says they “… brought to him a man who was deaf and could hardly talk …” There’s a single Greek word mogilalon that’s used there and no other place in the Bible except Isaiah 35:5. It’s a very rare word. There’s no reason that Mark would have used it except he wants us to cross-reference what’s happening here with Isaiah 35. In Isaiah 35, it’s a prophecy of the Messiah. In Isaiah 35, we’re told this. God says, “Be strong, do not fear; your God will come, he will come … with divine retribution he will come to save you. Then will the eyes of the blind be opened and the ears of the deaf unstopped. Then will the lame leap like a deer, and the mute tongue shout for joy.” Here’s what Mark is saying. He says, “I want you to realize this. Do you see the blind seeing? Do you see the deaf hearing, the mute tongue shouting for joy? God has come! Just like it said in Isaiah 35, God has come to save you! What a claim!” Jesus Christ is God come to save us, but wait. Wait! There’s something in there that Mark wants us to think about it. It says, “… with divine retribution he will come to save you.” Divine retribution! Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

2.4.2.3. What divine retribution? He didn't come to hack people.

2.4.2.3.1. That's what the people thought. Bring it Jesus. Yes!

2.4.2.3.2. Peter pulls out his sword .. the fight is on. Peter.. put away the sword --- you're a fisherman for goodness sakes! what do you know about using a sword... bu tthey are so ready

2.4.2.3.3. **** Jesus didn't come to bring divine retribution --- he came to BEAR DIVINE RETRIBUTION

2.4.2.3.4. For jesus, theses glimpses of the kingdom, for redemption are not jus tloving stories of compassion, but constant reminders of his call -

2.4.2.3.5. On the cross, Jesus totally identified with us because he can only heal the sick and he can only raise the dead and he can only do these things if he pays the penalty for what you and I know we deserve. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

2.4.2.3.6. The sign here is a foreshadow of te sigh he will give on the cross

2.4.2.4. Here is where the two stories meet -

2.4.2.4.1. Also, all the things you and I, because of our self-justifying little hearts, don’t want to admit we deserve but we do. Because Jesus identified like that, now I know why you can approach him. Now you know why you can approach him. On the cross, do you know what you’re seeing? The ultimate Child of God was thrown away, cast out from the table without a crumb so those of us who are not children of God could be adopted and brought in. To put it another way, the Child had to become a dog so we dogs couldn’t just become little puppy pets, but we would become sons and daughters at the table. For this man’s tongue to be loosed, Jesus Christ had to become the Lamb who was dumb before his shearers. If you see that, if you see the Son became a dog so we dogs could become sons, that is what will give you that assertiveness. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

2.5. 35

2.5.1. ears were opened

2.5.2. tongue was released

2.5.2.1. The Lord had responded to Moses’ excuses, for example, with these words: “Who gave man his mouth? Who makes him deaf or mute? Who gives him sight or makes him blind? Is it not I, the LORD?” (Ex. 4: 11). Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (pp. 299-300). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.5.2.2. The original Greek is more vivid and concrete, saying that "the chain of his tongue was broken." In the NT, the word for "chain" (Gk. desmos; NIV, "loosened") most frequently means a chain or fetter that binds a prisoner (Luke 8: 29; Acts 16: 26; 20: 23; 26: 29; Phil 1: 7; Col 4: 18). The breaking of the fetter by Jesus is a figure of liberation (Luke 13: 16). 33 Likewise, the man was speaking "correctly" (Gk. orthōs; NIV, "plainly), meaning that the difficulties and impediments of v. 32 are removed. Edwards Jr., James R. (2009-10-05). The Gospel according to Mark (Pillar New Testament Commentary) (Kindle Locations 4289-4293). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

2.5.3. reference: Isa 35:5-6

2.5.3.1. Isaiah uses blindness and deafness as metaphors for the people’s spiritual disabilities (Isa. 6: 9– 10; 29: 18; 32: 3; 35: 5– 6; 42: 18– 20; 43: 18; 50: 5). 9 Both miracles serve as a paradigm for how the disciples, who are unable to hear, speak, and see on a spiritual level (8: 17– 18), will gain their hearing, voice, and sight. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 301). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.6. 36

2.6.1. tell no one

2.6.1.1. To ask a man who has just been given his voice to keep quiet may only strike us as strange (see 1: 44; 5: 43; 8: 26; 9: 9). Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 299). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.6.1.2. Hooker states it, these miracles symbolize the Christian faith— sight, hearing, resurrection— which become full realities only after the death and resurrection of Jesus; these physical cures cannot really be spoken of with understanding at this stage, because they point forward to events and spiritual changes which still lie in the future. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 299). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.6.1.3. Hooker continues, “The secrecy motif underlines the fact that it is only those who believe in the risen Lord who can understand the full significance of what was taking place in Jesus’ ministry.” 5 Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 299). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.6.1.4. The command to go and tell comes after the resurrection (16: 7).

2.7. SUMMARY

2.7.1. If the biblical echoes are deliberate and help interpret this miracle, and if Mark has woven this episode into the fabric of his narrative strategy as a paradigm for what needs to happen spiritually to the disciples, then this miracle has as much to do with spiritual as it does with physical healing. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 301). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.7.2. In some sense, we ought to read this as an illustration of what the disciples needed. Here this woman got it, but the disciples are like this man.

2.7.3. Opening up a person’s ears is vital since Jesus places so much emphasis on hearing his words (4: 3, 9, 12, 15, 18, 20, 23, 24, 33; 7: 14; 8: 18; 9: 7). Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 302). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

2.7.3.1. IILL: Beethoven died with the words, “I shall hear in heaven.” He hoped for the restoration of his physical hearing. Unless one hears spiritually God’s words on earth, one will never hear them in heaven. Garland, David E. (2011-03-01). Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 302). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

3. Common threads between the two

3.1. Jesus goes to Gentile lands

3.2. People begged him

3.2.1. This is what Jews should have been doing

3.3. Secret motif

3.3.1. vs 24

3.3.2. vs 36

3.4. Oddity of Jesus

3.4.1. Woman

3.4.1.1. He calls her a dog

3.4.1.2. Ignores her

3.4.1.3. Heals her because of her comments

3.4.2. Man

3.4.2.1. Weird healing - finger in ear .. etc

4. Flow of Mark

4.1. Jesus is on a Gentile Mission

4.1.1. For what purpose, mission or rest?

4.2. Remmeber he's been there in chapter 5 and thre he said go and tell everyone

4.2.1. Here it's hush hus, which may tell us jesus is there to rest, to stay with the disciples. Remember, he had tried to do that in Galilee

4.2.2. Perhpas he left to Gentile land for that reason.

4.2.3. Don't put down the normal means God uses, like let's go on a vacation or a retreat - jesus and the disicples.

4.3. Sign of his messiaship

4.3.1. And this may well be why these episodes, in which Jesus’ mission is extended to Gentiles, are included at this point in the narrative; because his ministry to the Gentiles is a sign of his messiahship, just as was his giving of bread in the wilderness, walking on water, and authoritative teaching on defilement...the episode, thus, brings the mission of the Gentiles to a conclusion, by including Gentiles among those who will share in the messianic banquet, of which this meal in the wilderness is a foretaste.46

4.4. Overall structure

4.4.1. A- Jesus feeds 5,000 Jews in a desert in Jewish territory and walks on water. B- Then heals those who come to him, C- after which he has a controversy with Pharisees over eating food with defiled hands. D- and teaches his disciples privately, declaring all foods clean. C- Then he immediately goes off to the unclean gentile territory of Tyre where he grants the request of an unclean Gentile woman by driving out an unclean spirit, B- after which he goes to other (sic) Gentile territory of the Decapolis where he heals a deaf and tongue-tied man A- and subsequently feeds 4,000 Gentiles in a desert.43

5. Lead in

5.1. Jesus just delcared all things clean - so what was unclean now is clean

5.2. This is imperative to undrstanding as mark then leads to this story

5.3. The general idea is that Jesus came to be the savior of the world

5.4. So far, the narrative has been hitting on the issues of true salvation, of true faith, of what works in here and not out there. But it's more than that right?

5.4.1. Jesus is not just here for personal salvation. When we view that we have limited eyes. We have needed humble eyes on self, but it can quickly become self-centered eyes

5.4.2. The scope of his salvation is global, world-wide

5.4.3. *** Important for the gentile readers to understand. The work of Messiah was not just for the Jewish land, but for the world and all it's woes. And the answer is not become Jewish - but know the ONE TRUE GOD

5.4.4. *** Remember the Jewish mission - t obe a blessing to al lthe world. Jesus came to accomplish what Israel failed at!

5.5. The narrative presents Jesus with an understanding of God and uncleanness which is different from that of the leaders of Israel. As depicted in the narrative, the leaders of Israel believe God and God's holy people will be protected from defilement by withdrawing from what is unclean. By contrast, Jesus does not act as if God or God's people will be defiled by what is unclean. Instead of withdrawing, God is an active force which renders clean what was unclean.' Rhoads

6. Intro

6.1. We’re looking at the life of Jesus in the gospel of Mark. In the very first half of the gospel of Mark, up to chapter 8, the question always in front of us is … Who is this? Who is Jesus? We going to see at the climax at the end of chapter 8 the incredible answer to that, but even before, Mark begins to put here before us the other big question of his book. The other big question is … How do you relate to someone like this? How do you approach someone like this? How do you connect? Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

6.2. Enigmatic

6.2.1. unclear, mysterious

6.2.2. Why take this loop to the Gentiles?

6.2.2.1. According to Pss. Sol. 17: 23-30, the Messiah would be ordained to expel and subdue the Gentiles, not to visit and embrace them. Edwards Jr., James R. (2009-10-05). The Gospel according to Mark (Pillar New Testament Commentary) (Kindle Locations 4136-4137). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

6.2.3. If doing it why the secresy

6.2.4. Why healing but no teaching?

6.2.5. Why enter a house and not want any one to know

6.2.6. why call this woman a dog?

6.2.7. Why change his mind?

6.2.8. Why stick hand in ear and tongue?

7. Conclusion

7.1. Don't box Jesus in. He does what it takes to work in us

7.1.1. Conclusion. Let’s apply this to our lives. First, Jesus is not a tame lion. I’m sorry for lapsing back into Narnian dialect, but you don’t have to have read any of the Narnia chronicles to understand that little term “He is not a tame lion.” Look. He comes to the Syrophoenician woman, and he calls her a dog, enigmatic, cryptic, harsh. He comes to the deaf-mute, and he is immediately “melt-in-your-mouth” sweet. What is it with him? He is so unpredictable. Yeah, because he is the wonderful Counselor. He is the perfect Counselor.

7.1.2. In John 11 at the tomb of Lazarus who has died, he meets Martha and Mary, the sisters. Martha says, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died.” Jesus rebukes her. Then Mary comes up and says, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died.” Jesus just weeps with her. Same statement … by no means the same response. Why? Because Jesus always gives you what you need, and only he knows better than you.

7.1.3. Here’s Joseph, and he is in the pit in Dothan. He is going to be sold into slavery by his wicked brothers. He is praying to God. God doesn’t seem to answer. He is sold into slavery. Years later, here is Elisha at Dothan. They’re surrounded by the enemy. He prays, “Oh Lord, deliver us.” Chariots of fire come and destroy the enemy. Don’t you know God was just as present in his silence with Joseph as he was in his noisy chariots with Elisha? Because he was giving them what they needed. Only he knows. Don’t you dare think you know better than what he does that needs to be happening in your life. See? Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

7.1.4. Aslan - “Is he quite safe?” “Safe? Who said anything about being safe? Of course, he isn’t safe. But he is good. He is the king, I tell you.”

7.2. His life breaks down barriers

7.2.1. Second thing. Jesus is a wonderful example for reaching out across cultural and racial barriers. See? Cultural and racial barriers are no problem for him at all. Gender barriers are no problem for him. Just as he has reached across them, so we should if we are trying to walk in his footsteps. In a church like this, especially in a city like this, we should go out of our way, not just simply go with the flow and just constantly hang out with people of our own race, in our own class, in our own age, in our own gender but actually reach across and make strong friendships Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

7.2.2. Until you see that Jesus Christ had to become a dog so you could become a son or daughter, until your self-righteousness is ruined and melted away and affirmed away and loved away by that, you will never really overcome the true self-righteousness that creates exclusiveness. There are a lot of people around who say, “Oh, I’m over my racial intolerance. You see, I have a very open mind,” but they look down their nose at people they consider bigoted. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

7.3. Don’t be too proud to accept what the gospel says about your unworthiness. Don’t be too despondent to accept what the gospel says about how loved you are. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

7.3.1. John Newton, a pastor, wrote a pastoral counseling letter to a man who was very depressed. Listen to what he says. He says, “You say you feel overwhelmed with guilt and a sense of unworthiness? Well, indeed you cannot be too aware of the evils inside of yourself, but you may be, indeed you are, improperly controlled and affected by them. You say it is hard to understand how a holy God could accept such an awful person as yourself. You then express not only a low opinion of yourself, which is right, but also too low an opinion of the person, work, and promises of the Redeemer, which is wrong.” See? “You complain about sin, but when I look at your complaints, they are so full of self-righteousness, unbelief, pride, and impatience that they are little better than the worst evils you complain of.