Standards and Objectives of ELL Programs By Chris Frost for M2U5A2

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Standards and Objectives of ELL Programs By Chris Frost for M2U5A2 by Mind Map: Standards and Objectives of ELL Programs By Chris Frost for M2U5A2

1. Arizona's Structured English Immersion (SEI) Program

1.1. 1. Pre-Emergent ELL

1.1.1. A student at this level has no ability or a very limited ability to speak, write, or comprehend text in English. The student recognizes that spoken words are represented by written language. Short messages can be communicated via drawing, imitative writing, or using key words.

1.1.1.1. For this ELL, I would talk very slowly and simply, and use a lot of eye contact. I would use a lot of visuals and hands-on lessons in my teaching. I would use a student or staff translator to bridge the communication gap and help the student build confidence. Simple and shortened assignments will be gives so as not to overwhelm. I would incorporate lessons about the student's culture and language to make him/her feel welcome.

1.2. 2. Emergent ELL

1.2.1. A student at this level is able to produce short phrases and simple sentences with linguistic help. The student has a limited ability to understand text read in English. The student has limited ability to write in English, but may be able to write letters of the alphabet and first name using a capital letter.

1.2.1.1. For this ELL, I would again talk very slowly and simply. Eye contact is important. I would use a lot of visuals and hands-on lessons to teach concepts. I would use a student or staff translator to bridge the communication gap and help the student build confidence. Ideally, when working in groups or pairs, I would have this student with a student or staff translator. Extra time and/or shortened assignments will be given. Simple writing assignments would be given to encourage proper letter formation.

1.3. 3. Basic ELL

1.3.1. A student at this level can use sentence structures, including regular subjects, and simple and progressive tenses. The student relies on visuals, organizational features, and contextual clues to understand text. The student can pick out key information from text read aloud. The student has limited writing ability in English, but can organize writing from left to right, top to bottom, and put space between words.

1.3.1.1. When working in groups or pairs, my Basic ELL will be placed with a fellow student who is patient and thorough. This student will not necessary be bilingual, but could be if enough translators exist. Visuals and hands-on instructions is still important to this student. This ELL, if comfortable, may be asked to answer questions out loud to build confidence. Writing assignments will focus less on content, but more on organization.

1.4. 4. Low Intermediate ELL

1.4.1. A student at this level will attempt speaking in complex sentences. Students are still acquiring irregular subject and verb forms. In text, the student uses sound/symbol relationships and syllabication rules to decode. The student has a limited ability to write in English, but can apply subject/verb agreement to writing sentences, paragraphs, etc. Sound/symbol relationships are applied to spell one-syllable and high-frequency words.

1.4.1.1. This ELL will be encouraged to complete more work independently. Writing assignments will be modified to focus on the particular needs of the student. When working in groups or pairs, this ELL will be placed with a fellow student who is patient and thorough. This student will not be bilingual. Spelling assignments will be modified to include short and simple words. I will ask this student questions about his/her work that require more in-depth answers.

1.5. 5. High Intermediate ELL

1.5.1. A student at this level can speak in simple and complex sentences. The student has the ability to understand text by reading fluently in English. The student has the ability to write in English and can use correct subject/verb agreement. Errors in writing do not interfere with the reader's comprehension.

1.5.1.1. My High Intermediate ELL will be expected to complete a lot of work independently. This student is ready to help ELLs whose English is not as advanced. This will boost confidence. This student's spelling and grammar will be corrected and I will encourage writing in a logical manner. When opportunities for reading out loud exist, this student will be asked to do so.

1.6. 6. Proficient ELL

1.6.1. The student demonstrates competency in listening and speaking, reading, and writing at the High Intermediate level in order to access grade-level academic content. The student is now ready for an English-only classroom.

1.6.1.1. At the Proficient level, this ELL is ready for an English-only classroom and will enter the two-year monitoring phase. I will trust this student to help a student whose English proficiency isn't as developed. This could be a fellow ELL student or non-ELL student. This will be done to build confidence and to pass on knowledge learned. In addition, I will ask this ELL to explain in greater detail how questions were answered, and I will pose questions that are more thought-provoking.

2. New York State's Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Program

2.1. 1. Entering ELL

2.1.1. A student at the Entering level has great dependence on supports and structures to advance academic language skills and has not yet met the linguistic demands necessary to demonstrate English language proficiency in a variety of academic contexts (settings).

2.1.1.1. For this ELL, I would talk very slowly and simply, and use a lot of eye contact. I would use a lot of visuals and hands-on lessons in my teaching. Since lessons would be in both the student's home language and English, the English portion would be very basic. My classroom would have many translating tools available, like books, posters, computer programs, etc. Customs and traditions of the students will be celebrated.

2.2. 2. Emerging ELL

2.2.1. A student at the Emerging level has some dependence on supports and structures to advance his or her academic language skills. A student at this level has yet to meet the linguistic demands necessary to demonstrate proficiency in a variety of academic contexts within this grade level.

2.2.1.1. For this ELL, I would talk very slowly and simply, and use a lot of eye contact. I would use a lot of visuals and hands-on lessons in my teaching. As the student becomes more comfortable with the English language, a gradual increase in English instruction vs. home language instruction would occur. Students will begin to be asked more questions in English, like yes/no questions.

2.3. 3. Transitioning ELL

2.3.1. A student at the Transitioning level shows some independence in advancing his or her academic language skills. A student at this level has yet to meet the linguistic demands necessary to demonstrate proficiency in a variety of academic contexts within this grade level.

2.3.1.1. This ELL student should now be more comfortable answering questions in English vs. their home language. With the help of visuals and hands-on lessons, students will work together to complete simple assignments in English. Translation resources will be available throughout the classroom to encourage students to answer questions on their own rather than asking for help. This will build independence.

2.4. 4. Expanding ELL

2.4.1. A student at the Expanding level shows great independence in advancing his or her academic language skills. A student at this level is approaching the linguistic demands necessary to demonstrate proficiency in a variety of academic contexts within this grade level.

2.4.1.1. More time will be given to English instruction vs. home language instruction. This student is almost ready for an English-only classroom, so more time will be spent asking the student questions in English and expecting writing to be in English. Proper grammar, spelling, sentence structure, etc. will be expected.

2.5. 5. Commanding ELL

2.5.1. A student at the Commanding level is now designated as a Former ELL. A student at this level has met the linguistic demands necessary to demonstrate proficiency in a variety of academic contexts within this grade level.

2.5.1.1. This ELL has been deemed ready for an English-only classroom without additional monitoring. This ELL will receive tips and guidance on how the transition will take place to ensure it is smooth. I will be in contact with his/her future teacher to discuss the student's strengths and challenges. Also, perhaps a visit to the classroom can be arranged to minimize any fear that might exist.